Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: My first OBW and I'm STUCK!

  1. #1
    Super Member jillaine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    California Girl exiled in DC
    Posts
    1,394
    Blog Entries
    1
    Apologies for photo quality. My blackberry's camera leaves MUCH to be desired.

    I picked up this fabric the other day, wanting to try a OBW/Kaleidoscope. I'm doing a hexagon.

    I've read tutorials, I've watched youtube videos. I get what I need to do ONCE I decide where to cut. I just can't figure out where to cut, and if to cut selvage to selvage, or the other direction. I see where the repeat is-- and there are 12" between repeats. So I THINK I cut a 12" width even though I want to end up with 4.5" strips? Huh?

    So I'm staring at this fabric and not quite knowing how to decide where to cut, which direction? how many inches. horiz? vertical?

    I'm stuck!!!! help !!!
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #2
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,108
    Blog Entries
    1
    Some of us cut the fabric in half lengthwise first. It is easier to handle the shorter pieces :wink:
    Then we made the cuts on the repeats across the width of the fabric.
    Yes, start at one repeat, and cut across in the same place on all of the other repeats too.
    I love your fabric :D:D:D

  3. #3
    Super Member jillaine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    California Girl exiled in DC
    Posts
    1,394
    Blog Entries
    1
    And why would I use that strip method (where you flip the triangle template along a 4.5" strip?) instead of fussy-cutting the sections of the fabric I want to form the triangles? (Other than wasting a ton of fabric?)

  4. #4
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,108
    Blog Entries
    1
    It is a lot less cutting this way. Once you cut the strips and line them up, cutting the triangles goes quickly.

    Fussy cutting all of the pieces is time consuming, and you also need to make sure all of your cuts are identical :D:D:D

    Once you cut your strips into repeats, then you can decide what widths to sub cut them into.

  5. #5
    Super Member jillaine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    California Girl exiled in DC
    Posts
    1,394
    Blog Entries
    1
    Amma,
    Thanks for your support.
    But please answer this: when you cut strips and cut triangles from the strips, isn't it true that you are giving up all control over where the triangles fall on the fabric?

  6. #6
    Super Member spartan quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    central North Dakota
    Posts
    1,320
    But the nice thing is, you have 3 choices of how to sew your triangles together. I just finished one, and that was really hard. It took me almost as long to play with each set of 6, determining which point I wanted in the center. But it is worth it in the end. Have fun cutting.:)

    Quote Originally Posted by jillaine
    Amma,
    Thanks for your support.
    But please answer this: when you cut strips and cut triangles from the strips, isn't it true that you are giving up all control over where the triangles fall on the fabric?
    :thumbup:

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Elmira, NY
    Posts
    6,232
    Instead of fussy cutting, the fabric is stacked matching the pattern one on top of the other, and then cut with the triangles. Then the patterns match. It could be done with strips, too, I guess, just matching up the print in the pattern.

  8. #8
    Super Member Katrine's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    France
    Posts
    1,815
    I would strongly recommend you get the book One Block Wonders.
    It is all perfectly explained and shown in there, and very easy to follow.
    I've made lots of obws but still refer to the book now and again.
    I've seen others comment that once they had the book they found it easy.

  9. #9
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    7,377
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Katrine
    I would strongly recommend you get the book One Block Wonders.
    It is all perfectly explained and shown in there, and very easy to follow.
    I've made lots of obws but still refer to the book now and again.
    I've seen others comment that once they had the book they found it easy.
    What she said!!!

  10. #10
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    6,843
    Blog Entries
    2
    In the book, the author says to put the straight grain of the fabric to the outside of the hexagon blocks. I figured that I knew better and took a lot of time turning the triangles to get the 'prettiest' blocks. Well, I'll be darned if she didn't know what she was talking about! The blocks that had the straight of grain on the outside were easier to work with and you are going to be hard pressed to pick out an individual hexagon when you are done. They will all blend in, so the extra time I took playing with each hex to get it pretty was pretty much wasted. BTW, fussy cutting the hexes is what you would do for a Stack and Whack. In this type of quilt, you fussy cut your blocks then use other fabric (usually solids) to isolate and highlight your kalidescope blocks. Because you are surrounding them with a solid color the individual blocks stand out and so fussy cutting them makes sense.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.