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Thread: Need advice with border malfunction

  1. #1
    Senior Member JenelTX's Avatar
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    Need advice with border malfunction

    I'm still very much a newbie, working on my second quilt, and I've run into a situation where I need the advice of you more experienced quilters. I have a pieced border (three strips), and I'm mitering the corners. The first corner turned out fine. The second corner, I screwed up the alignment, and the corner doesn't lay completely flat. The problem is, I didn't realize this until after I had cut away the excess fabric. (Lesson learned... check first, then cut.)

    My instinct is to pull out the seam ripper and go at it again. Should I do that, though, now that I've cut away the excess fabric? Or will I make things worse? As it is, there are a few little ripples that I think I can disguise somewhat with strategic quilting.
    Jenel Looney
    Assistant to Susan Mallery
    New York Times bestselling author

  2. #2
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    If you ripped the seams out to fix them, will there be enough fabric to sew them back together even if your seam allowance was only 1/8"? If so, I'd do that.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  3. #3
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    If you quilt heavily along your borders in an intricate pattern or even a close meander and then it lays flat, why go thru the ripping? Unless you are wanting to quilt a stitch in the ditch or something like that pattern.

  4. #4
    Senior Member JenelTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TanyaL View Post
    If you quilt heavily along your borders in an intricate pattern or even a close meander and then it lays flat, why go thru the ripping? Unless you are wanting to quilt a stitch in the ditch or something like that pattern.
    I'm planning to quilt snowflakes and swirly patterns over the whole quilt, including the border, so I could definitely find a way to tamp down the wavy bits.
    Jenel Looney
    Assistant to Susan Mallery
    New York Times bestselling author

  5. #5
    Senior Member JenelTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DogHouseMom View Post
    If you ripped the seams out to fix them, will there be enough fabric to sew them back together even if your seam allowance was only 1/8"? If so, I'd do that.
    I don't know whether there would be enough or not. That's the fear I'm having. I'm not sure how to figure that out in advance.
    Jenel Looney
    Assistant to Susan Mallery
    New York Times bestselling author

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JenelTX View Post
    I'm planning to quilt snowflakes and swirly patterns over the whole quilt, including the border, so I could definitely find a way to tamp down the wavy bits.
    Unless the quilt police inspect on a regular basis at your home I wouldn't rip.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Hen3rietta's Avatar
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    If it really bothers you, change the corners to blocks. I found my first few miters tricky. Now I measure and cut the angle before I sew the border on. Then I only need to match edges.
    Diana

  8. #8
    Senior Member Judi in Ohio's Avatar
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    You know Jenel, you are a newbie and this is just one of many things you will teach yourself. The problem is in how much pull does it have? Is washing going to make it worse when it shrinks? Plus, even if you quilt it down, these problems make your quilt cup when quilted (according to how much tighter the outside seam is). One thing you can do is just make setting blocks for the corners. It really is all according to how bad you think it is. My first quilt was a log cabin - it was gorgeous, at least I thought so. I decided to machine embroider quilt it. Well machine embroider quilting is rather heavy and they go over the same design line many times. Many of my blocks were off register, but I still love this quilt. I have since machine embroidered my quilts in a quilt pattern and they've turned out well. I learned to look at the em design first and decide if it is light enough. It all comes with doing. Consider them design inspirations when you have to change a design because of a mistake - booboo-oops.
    Judi in Ohio

  9. #9
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    If you think you can quilt it out, I would leave it. Even if you fix it, it's on the bias so you know it's going to stretch. If you rip and resew the corner may be worse after the stretching. Good luck!

  10. #10
    Senior Member JenelTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hen3rietta View Post
    If it really bothers you, change the corners to blocks. I found my first few miters tricky. Now I measure and cut the angle before I sew the border on. Then I only need to match edges.
    I'm in love with the mitered corners, so I won't do the corner blocks. But I love your method of measuring and cutting in advance. It seems like a more precise way to do miters. Thank you!
    Jenel Looney
    Assistant to Susan Mallery
    New York Times bestselling author

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