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Thread: Newbie with a sewing machine question...

  1. #1
    Senior Member tngal22's Avatar
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    Newbie with a sewing machine question...

    I was given a 1966 Singer sewing machine (in a table) to practice sewing with...and to see if I would even like sewing. I hadn't touched a machine in 20+ years. However, I am addicted. lol Since November, I have made bedding for baby bed, 4 baby blankets, a purse, my daughter a Christmas outfit, Christmas PJ's, notebook covers and a doggie pillow. My husband is wanting me to make a queen size quilt out of his Army uniforms. I have the design drawn out and most of the uniforms cut out...waiting on him to get me the rest. On to my question, since I am lovin' sewing and hope to learn more, I am debating on rather to buy a new machine. My budget isn't high so I can't afford the high end machines. I was looking at the Brother SQ9050 at Wal-Mart but I am not sure it would handle the big quilt of uniforms. So should I just keep using the 1966 Singer or do you recommend another machine that would be good for quilting and other sewing items? I do prefer to stay under $200 if possible. BUT if there is one higher, let me know and I can always save for one I guess. lol

    Thanks in Advance!

  2. #2
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    Like you noted ... budget comes first.

    Would you consider a gently used machine? Most sew & vacs and LQS's have them in good condition and some even with a guaranty. You might get more for you $ that way.

    ali
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  3. #3
    Super Member Shelbie's Avatar
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    I'd check out Kijiji (Canadian version of Craig's List in the States). I bought a barely used Husqvarna #1+with most of the parts still sealed up in the original boxes for $200. It just hadn't been used and had originally been sold for $3600 plus tax. I keep checking the sewing machine section and frequently see very good machines for very little money. A classic vintage machine would probably stitch much better for you than a cheapie plastic one from Wal-Mart. My 201 Singer was free and it FM quilts beautifully and has a big throat for an old machine. It is fast and powers through multiple layers of fabrics with no complaints.
    Shelbie from the High County in Southern Ontario

  4. #4
    Senior Member tngal22's Avatar
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    Thanks for the fast responses.

    I am not opposed to a used machine if it was a good machine. And I will check the site you mentioned. I think I found a dealer/store close by so I might try to stop by one day to see what they have. And I figured the machine I have is probably more durable than most made now. It does need a good cleaning but I haven't found a place around here that does that.

  5. #5
    Super Member
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    I've found you can't beat an old Singer for any kind of sewing I 've quilted on mine for 40 yrs with out any problems Cleaning and oiling is something you can do at home and save you money for fabric Stop at the sew/vac shop and they can show you how if you don't have the manual Have fun

  6. #6
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    You can clean it yourself. Check online for a manual. I didn't print the 40 some page one for the 1978 machine I cleaned - just read what I needed to. Work on a very large towel with a muffin tin for removed screws and remember where you took them out. I scrubbed the exterior with Simple Green and dried it well, then cleaned the inside with oil. If a spot moves oil it well. If the book calls for grease, get some - don't use oil. Take the bobbin area apart and get all old lint and thread. Toothbushes and lint brushes get a workout, but it's easy to do.

    I don't know much about a 1966 model - the newest one I use for quilting is a 1956, but if yours is working well, then put the money aside and enjoy your vintage machine. There will be machines available when you need one. I might watch Craigslist for a backup, but avoid a used plastic machine.

  7. #7
    Power Poster
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    If this machine is working well - hang on to it and continue to use it. (Unless, of course, you have your heart set on getting a new one)

    Read all the posts by people scoring some of the older Singers - some of the older ones sew beautifully.

    Newer isn't always better.

  8. #8
    Senior Member tngal22's Avatar
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    Thanks! It does need a good cleaning because it had been sitting up for YEARS before I got it and I didn't clean it out well before I started using it. I found the manual on Singer's site, I didn't have any tools with the machine so I will have to buy some.

    I don't have my heart set on a new one, but I have been trying to find parts for the machine and it seems this model is harder to find parts for...ie walking foot. Or maybe I have been looking in the wrong spot. It is a model 347.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Jennie and Me's Avatar
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    If the machine is in good working order and you are comfortable with I, I would suggest just using it and maybe starting a savings account for a new one if the need ever arises. I honestly don't think that you can beat the older Singers. I do have a Viking that I bought new in 2003 and I love it dearly, however, if it ever dies on me I will definitely go with my back-up machines, which are a Featherweight and a 301. They are fantastic machines.

  10. #10
    Super Member
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    Well...you may find you prefer your old Singer even after you get a new machine. My mom's old machine (about the same or a little older than your's) has an excellent straight stitch. If I were you, I would continue to use it and save my money to someday buy a higher-line embroidery machine.

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