Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 5 6
Results 51 to 57 of 57

Thread: Piecing the back

  1. #51
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    So. Fla now, Va orig
    Posts
    1,552
    Quote Originally Posted by nance-ell
    So, I've been reading the threads about how to piece the back. My quilt top is 65 x 65. I bought 4 yards of fabric and cut it in half. I was going to sew them together and then put it on the back with the WOF on one side and the balance to finish it off. My thinking was that would use 45 WOF plus 30 and I would be left with a 15 inch strip for future use. I was reading where a lot of folks use the 45 WOF down the middle and cut the 2nd piece in half for either side. Either way avoids a seam down the middle. Is it really going to make that much difference which way I do it? This is the only my 2nd quilt top and I have yet to try to complete the first one, so essentially, this is my first quilt. I don't want to be discouraged when I'm finished as I'm really hoping to use and enjoy this quilt. I want to make a good choice from the experience of all the wonderful folks on the board. Thanks!
    The professional way is to put the center panel full width thru the center of the quilt, and split one half for the two sides left and right of center. If you notice wide bedspreads that are not ultra wide fabric you will see they too use this process. :D

  2. #52
    Member Virginia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Cheektowaga, NY
    Posts
    58
    Right you are.........

  3. #53
    a regular here quilting cat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    1,332
    I have found that it quilts flatter if the lengthwise grain matches the quilt.

  4. #54
    Super Member fleurdelisquilts.com's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Evergreen LA
    Posts
    1,549
    I'm stressed just reading this thread. Here's the thing: if it's a beginning quilt, chances are it won't last for 100+ years. That isn't meant to hurt anyone's feelings, it's just how it is. My first quilts were far from perfect in every way. The very first one I made lived through only 15 years of abuse from my boys, not bad in my opinion.

    The point is that while you still consider yourself a beginner, you can't expect your quilts to last forever, you're learning. So do the best you can at every stage, but don't stress yourself. When you're a better quilter, you can fret about the things that will mean the difference of your quilt lasting for years after you're gone. I started fretting about that after I won a ribbon in a local show. That event was my way of knowing that I'd improved to the point that I was on par with other quilters. And it meant that my quilts were perhaps valuable enough that I'd want them to last for much longer. That's when I started to worry about where backing seams go, which batting was better, etc.

    But this is just my opinion and my way of judging the value of MY work. You need to set your own standards for your quilting.

  5. #55
    Senior Member nance-ell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    830
    Quote Originally Posted by fleurdelisquilts.com
    I'm stressed just reading this thread. Here's the thing: if it's a beginning quilt, chances are it won't last for 100+ years. That isn't meant to hurt anyone's feelings, it's just how it is. My first quilts were far from perfect in every way. The very first one I made lived through only 15 years of abuse from my boys, not bad in my opinion.

    The point is that while you still consider yourself a beginner, you can't expect your quilts to last forever, you're learning. So do the best you can at every stage, but don't stress yourself. When you're a better quilter, you can fret about the things that will mean the difference of your quilt lasting for years after you're gone. I started fretting about that after I won a ribbon in a local show. That event was my way of knowing that I'd improved to the point that I was on par with other quilters. And it meant that my quilts were perhaps valuable enough that I'd want them to last for much longer. That's when I started to worry about where backing seams go, which batting was better, etc.

    But this is just my opinion and my way of judging the value of MY work. You need to set your own standards for your quilting.
    Well, I'm not expecting perfection, though I am a perfectionist. I don't expect this quilt to last forever. However, for the money and time I've already invested, I do want it to be something I can enjoy and be proud of. I am learning a lot as I go.

  6. #56
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    So. Fla now, Va orig
    Posts
    1,552
    Quote Originally Posted by fleurdelisquilts.com
    I'm stressed just reading this thread. Here's the thing: if it's a beginning quilt, chances are it won't last for 100+ years. That isn't meant to hurt anyone's feelings, it's just how it is. My first quilts were far from perfect in every way. The very first one I made lived through only 15 years of abuse from my boys, not bad in my opinion.

    The point is that while you still consider yourself a beginner, you can't expect your quilts to last forever, you're learning. So do the best you can at every stage, but don't stress yourself. When you're a better quilter, you can fret about the things that will mean the difference of your quilt lasting for years after you're gone. I started fretting about that after I won a ribbon in a local show. That event was my way of knowing that I'd improved to the point that I was on par with other quilters. And it meant that my quilts were perhaps valuable enough that I'd want them to last for much longer. That's when I started to worry about where backing seams go, which batting was better, etc.

    But this is just my opinion and my way of judging the value of MY work. You need to set your own standards for your quilting.
    Sorry you were stressed, however, it helps a beginner just as much as a pro to know the proper way to do things, then it is up to them to decide whether they want to do this or that. If we aren't exposed to the right techniques early on we will just make things harder for ourselves. So hooray for this board and all the willing posters who make it a great learning tool. :-)

  7. #57
    Panther Creek Quilting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central Missouri Backwoods
    Posts
    797
    Quote Originally Posted by nance-ell
    Thanks for the replies! That diagonal looks interesting and I may try that sometime. Not sure I'm up to it for this one. I just added a picture of the background fabric. I don't think it is going to be that noticeable to have one seam off center. I thought the quilt top was the hard part with all the decisions to make! lol

    I had to laugh. Yes there are as many ways to bak quilt and bind a quilt as there are patterns for the fronts, LOL!

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 5 6

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.