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Thread: Piecing batting

  1. #11
    Super Member Gwyn's Avatar
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    When I make a rag quilt or a Cathedral Window I like to put the batting in the center of the square at the very beginning. That way I can use smaller pieces and my quilt is completed much faster. I use light and natural batting so when I make a log cabin quilt, I sew the fabric directly to the batt. When I sew the squares together, I trim the batting so it isn't overlapping. Then I just tie the quilt after putting the backing on.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Shelley's Avatar
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    I prefer EASY!

    I use a very light weight fusable interfacing, like what we sometimes used for garment making. Cut it into strips, 2-3" wide. Lay the edges of the batting together, use the IRON to fuse them together. No wrestling under the machine! When you have an available 40% off coupon, you can get yards of this for about $.60 per yard. Great stuff to have around.

    I also use the light weight fusable interfacing as a stabilizer for t-shirt quilts - iron a piece bigger than what your final square will be, then trim shirt and fusable to the correct size.

  3. #13
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    I piece my battings quite often. Mainly for my wall hangings. I just zig zag the pieces together and they work great.

  4. #14
    omak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shelley
    I prefer EASY!

    I use a very light weight fusable interfacing, like what we sometimes used for garment making. Cut it into strips, 2-3" wide. Lay the edges of the batting together, use the IRON to fuse them together. No wrestling under the machine! When you have an available 40% off coupon, you can get yards of this for about $.60 per yard. Great stuff to have around.

    I also use the light weight fusable interfacing as a stabilizer for t-shirt quilts - iron a piece bigger than what your final square will be, then trim shirt and fusable to the correct size.
    I have shared the fusible interfacing solution with many quilters since I learned it - - from you, Shelley? - - anyway, it is so superior to the stitching method in my experience that I highly recommend it.

  5. #15
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shelley
    I prefer EASY!

    I use a very light weight fusable interfacing, like what we sometimes used for garment making. Cut it into strips, 2-3" wide. Lay the edges of the batting together, use the IRON to fuse them together. No wrestling under the machine! When you have an available 40% off coupon, you can get yards of this for about $.60 per yard. Great stuff to have around.

    I also use the light weight fusable interfacing as a stabilizer for t-shirt quilts - iron a piece bigger than what your final square will be, then trim shirt and fusable to the correct size.
    Shelley, do you use this on one side of the batting or on both sides?

  6. #16
    Senior Member Shelley's Avatar
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    Just on one side. All you are trying to do is hold it together so there are no gaps. Once it is in a quilt, it won't move.

  7. #17
    Lisa T's Avatar
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    Well, I have always 3-step zigzagged my pieced battings. How clever to iron them!!

    I use the 3 step zigzag because it seems to hold a little better for me when I pull the batting taut to baste the quilt sandwich. I try to kind of wave my stitch a teeny bit so that sometimes one half gets the extra stitch and sometimes the other half gets it. I have never had a problem with doing it this way.

  8. #18
    Super Member Ms Grace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shelley
    I prefer EASY!

    I use a very light weight fusable interfacing, like what we sometimes used for garment making. Cut it into strips, 2-3" wide. Lay the edges of the batting together, use the IRON to fuse them together. No wrestling under the machine! When you have an available 40% off coupon, you can get yards of this for about $.60 per yard. Great stuff to have around.

    I also use the light weight fusable interfacing as a stabilizer for t-shirt quilts - iron a piece bigger than what your final square will be, then trim shirt and fusable to the correct size.
    Great tips! Thanks so much for sharing. :)

  9. #19
    Senior Member dojo36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewjoyce
    Yes, I piece batting all the time. Butt up two pieces under your sewing machine foot and zig-zag away.....that way your "seam" will be flat and once it's in a quilt, no one will ever know :D
    i do it just like this also and i've never had any problem with it and neither has anybody else whom i give my quilts to, not even the baby quilts.

  10. #20
    Super Member mimee4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shelley
    I prefer EASY!

    I use a very light weight fusable interfacing, like what we sometimes used for garment making. Cut it into strips, 2-3" wide. Lay the edges of the batting together, use the IRON to fuse them together. No wrestling under the machine! When you have an available 40% off coupon, you can get yards of this for about $.60 per yard. Great stuff to have around.

    I also use the light weight fusable interfacing as a stabilizer for t-shirt quilts - iron a piece bigger than what your final square will be, then trim shirt and fusable to the correct size.
    I totally agree with Shelly. I use the fusable interfacing - bits and pieces that are left over. I make sure I quilt over the "joint".

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