Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 32

Thread: Piecing batting

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Eagan,Minn.
    Posts
    24
    Hi Is it ever acceptable to piece batting? I am making a stained glass wall hanging & I was going to piece batting for it. I have batting leftovers from projects & hate to throw them. You all have such good quilting skills. I thankyou much

  2. #2
    Super Member sewjoyce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    9,664
    Yes, I piece batting all the time. Butt up two pieces under your sewing machine foot and zig-zag away.....that way your "seam" will be flat and once it's in a quilt, no one will ever know :D

  3. #3
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,889
    Blog Entries
    1
    You can piece batting. Here's the method I prefer.

    Overlap 2 pieces of batting. Cut a wavy line through both with a rotary cutter (maybe 4 to 6 inch curves). Discard the 2 wavy ends. The remaining pieces of batting will fit together perfectly. Use a tailor's hand tacking stitch on each side of the cut to secure the 2 pieces together. (Google tailor tacking, or watch Susan Schamber's video on how she bastes her quilt sandwich to see how that stitch is done.)

    The reason for making the wavy cuts through both is so you don't end up with a "crease" in your quilt where the batting joins.

  4. #4
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,851
    Of course you can piece binding, It is less apparent if you overlap the pieces a little, then cut a wavy edge through both edges. Remove the excess and but together and whipstitch kust enough to hold them. Your quilting stitches will hol;d the batting in place.

    I can't believe we all answered within the time it took to type a reply!

  5. #5
    Super Member NorBanaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    2,900
    Funny you should ask...I was just getting ready for tomorrow's mystery quilt and I ended up using 3 pieces to get the 28" X 28" I needed.

  6. #6
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    7,158
    Blog Entries
    3
    I also have a question regarding the quilting of a piece using pieced batting.

    When you do piece your battings, do you need to quilt more closely together in order to help it stay in place? Say for instance, if I had a star block that I was going to stitch in the ditch around, would that be enough to hold it in place, or would it require closer stitching like stippling or an allover quilt pattern?

  7. #7
    Super Member Shemjo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    St. Louis, Missouri
    Posts
    6,895
    If you piece your batting like the methods above, I see no problem with quilting it as you would a regular batting! I have never had any difficulty.

  8. #8
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    7,158
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Shemjo
    If you piece your batting like the methods above, I see no problem with quilting it as you would a regular batting! I have never had any difficulty.
    Are the ones you did used frequently, or are they wallhangings? I wouldn't hesitate on a wall hanging, but I do make a lot of baby quilts that have to hold up thru lots of washing and loving.

  9. #9
    Super Member Shemjo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    St. Louis, Missouri
    Posts
    6,895
    These were baby quilts!

  10. #10
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    7,158
    Blog Entries
    3
    That's good to know! I was saving my batting scraps for placemats and table runners, but now I won't hesitate to use them for quilts too. Thanks!

  11. #11
    Super Member Gwyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Brigham City, UT
    Posts
    1,909
    When I make a rag quilt or a Cathedral Window I like to put the batting in the center of the square at the very beginning. That way I can use smaller pieces and my quilt is completed much faster. I use light and natural batting so when I make a log cabin quilt, I sew the fabric directly to the batt. When I sew the squares together, I trim the batting so it isn't overlapping. Then I just tie the quilt after putting the backing on.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Shelley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Wilbur, WA
    Posts
    762
    I prefer EASY!

    I use a very light weight fusable interfacing, like what we sometimes used for garment making. Cut it into strips, 2-3" wide. Lay the edges of the batting together, use the IRON to fuse them together. No wrestling under the machine! When you have an available 40% off coupon, you can get yards of this for about $.60 per yard. Great stuff to have around.

    I also use the light weight fusable interfacing as a stabilizer for t-shirt quilts - iron a piece bigger than what your final square will be, then trim shirt and fusable to the correct size.

  13. #13
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    SW Iowa
    Posts
    32,958
    I piece my battings quite often. Mainly for my wall hangings. I just zig zag the pieces together and they work great.

  14. #14
    Super Member omak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Central Washington State
    Posts
    6,053
    Quote Originally Posted by Shelley
    I prefer EASY!

    I use a very light weight fusable interfacing, like what we sometimes used for garment making. Cut it into strips, 2-3" wide. Lay the edges of the batting together, use the IRON to fuse them together. No wrestling under the machine! When you have an available 40% off coupon, you can get yards of this for about $.60 per yard. Great stuff to have around.

    I also use the light weight fusable interfacing as a stabilizer for t-shirt quilts - iron a piece bigger than what your final square will be, then trim shirt and fusable to the correct size.
    I have shared the fusible interfacing solution with many quilters since I learned it - - from you, Shelley? - - anyway, it is so superior to the stitching method in my experience that I highly recommend it.

  15. #15
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    7,158
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Shelley
    I prefer EASY!

    I use a very light weight fusable interfacing, like what we sometimes used for garment making. Cut it into strips, 2-3" wide. Lay the edges of the batting together, use the IRON to fuse them together. No wrestling under the machine! When you have an available 40% off coupon, you can get yards of this for about $.60 per yard. Great stuff to have around.

    I also use the light weight fusable interfacing as a stabilizer for t-shirt quilts - iron a piece bigger than what your final square will be, then trim shirt and fusable to the correct size.
    Shelley, do you use this on one side of the batting or on both sides?

  16. #16
    Senior Member Shelley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Wilbur, WA
    Posts
    762
    Just on one side. All you are trying to do is hold it together so there are no gaps. Once it is in a quilt, it won't move.

  17. #17
    Lisa T's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Menominee, Michigan
    Posts
    918
    Well, I have always 3-step zigzagged my pieced battings. How clever to iron them!!

    I use the 3 step zigzag because it seems to hold a little better for me when I pull the batting taut to baste the quilt sandwich. I try to kind of wave my stitch a teeny bit so that sometimes one half gets the extra stitch and sometimes the other half gets it. I have never had a problem with doing it this way.

  18. #18
    Super Member Ms Grace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    3,842
    Blog Entries
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by Shelley
    I prefer EASY!

    I use a very light weight fusable interfacing, like what we sometimes used for garment making. Cut it into strips, 2-3" wide. Lay the edges of the batting together, use the IRON to fuse them together. No wrestling under the machine! When you have an available 40% off coupon, you can get yards of this for about $.60 per yard. Great stuff to have around.

    I also use the light weight fusable interfacing as a stabilizer for t-shirt quilts - iron a piece bigger than what your final square will be, then trim shirt and fusable to the correct size.
    Great tips! Thanks so much for sharing. :)

  19. #19
    Senior Member dojo36's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Odessa, Texas
    Posts
    884
    Quote Originally Posted by sewjoyce
    Yes, I piece batting all the time. Butt up two pieces under your sewing machine foot and zig-zag away.....that way your "seam" will be flat and once it's in a quilt, no one will ever know :D
    i do it just like this also and i've never had any problem with it and neither has anybody else whom i give my quilts to, not even the baby quilts.

  20. #20
    Super Member mimee4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    3,735
    Quote Originally Posted by Shelley
    I prefer EASY!

    I use a very light weight fusable interfacing, like what we sometimes used for garment making. Cut it into strips, 2-3" wide. Lay the edges of the batting together, use the IRON to fuse them together. No wrestling under the machine! When you have an available 40% off coupon, you can get yards of this for about $.60 per yard. Great stuff to have around.

    I also use the light weight fusable interfacing as a stabilizer for t-shirt quilts - iron a piece bigger than what your final square will be, then trim shirt and fusable to the correct size.
    I totally agree with Shelly. I use the fusable interfacing - bits and pieces that are left over. I make sure I quilt over the "joint".

  21. #21
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Tupelo, MS
    Posts
    195
    good information prism99 also the one recommending light interfacing- I have some to piece also and was afraid it would show in the finished product

  22. #22
    Senior Member Kara's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    759
    I put the two pieces on top of each other. Sew right along the edge of the fabric in a very long, very narrow blanket stitch. When you open it, there's no telling where it was pieced.

    I guess the best thing is knowing you used some "scraps" and nobody will know.

  23. #23

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Johns Creek, GA
    Posts
    369
    Love your idea. I piece batting (always the same brand) all the time but never thought or knew about the curved cut. Makes a lot of sense. You are my good tip of the day. Thanks.

  24. #24

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    125
    The only caution I would make is to make sure the pieces are of similar batting. In other words, don't put cotton batting with polyester or of different thicknesses. I've done this successfully many times. I'm making a quilt that every block has it's own batting that I whip stitch to the next block, then quilt. It turns out very nice.

    Linda

  25. #25
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Daytona Beach Shores, FL
    Posts
    2,355
    Blog Entries
    1
    I piece batting all the time but I'll have to try the interfacing. Do you use this method just for quilts that are decorative or for all of them.
    Quote Originally Posted by Shelley
    I prefer EASY!

    I use a very light weight fusable interfacing, like what we sometimes used for garment making. Cut it into strips, 2-3" wide. Lay the edges of the batting together, use the IRON to fuse them together. No wrestling under the machine! When you have an available 40% off coupon, you can get yards of this for about $.60 per yard. Great stuff to have around.

    I also use the light weight fusable interfacing as a stabilizer for t-shirt quilts - iron a piece bigger than what your final square will be, then trim shirt and fusable to the correct size.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.