Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Prewashing batiks with Retayne in smaller batches?

  1. #1
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,722
    Someone on the board was kind enough to send me an extra bottle of Retayne and Shout Color Catchers. I've been soaking my fabric in hot water...someone mentioned they found some batiks didn't bleed until the second washing because the wax resist didn't come off until the second washing so I want to get any leftover wax resist.

    I'm almost all done pre-soaking so I'll be ready to use the Retayne soon. I'm wondering about throwing all the fabrics into one batch (was going to do them by hand rather than machine). I have various different greens, anything from olive to bright green. Some hardly bled while some bled like a slaughtered hog. I have just fat quarters and quarter yards so I'm thinking maybe I could do them one at a time and using 1 tsp. of the Retayne (it says a TBSP for every yard). Would that even work?

  2. #2
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,111
    Blog Entries
    1
    I suggest washing your batiks with laundry soap and very warm water and rinsing them several times first. Removing as much of the wax as possible. Use the same type of detergent you will use to wash the finished quilt.

    I do not use an abundance of this solution when I treat my batiks. I mix up a good amount per instructions, and then thoroughly wet the fabric with it, place it in plastic bags for the time specified, then rinse well and dry.

    I have found you don't need the water over the top of the fabric, or a bit of fabric in a pool of the solution LOL
    As long as the fabric is thoroughly wet with the solution, the Retayne will do it's job :D:D:D

    If you use a lot of batiks or other fabrics that tend to bleed, it doesn't take long to go through a bottle. I like to be thrifty, and using according to the label is pretty wasteful, not to mention using/disposing of more chemical than necessary (thinking green) :D:D:D

  3. #3
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,837
    The instructions for Retayne call for the water to be over 140 degrees to be effective. You only need enough water to cover the fabric... this creates a stronger solution ratio and is most effective. I do mine on the stove so I can maintain 140 degrees and use a small pot ( less water)
    That being said the fabrics that you treat will shed dye in the process. I have done similiar colors and similiar value at the same time .... and had good results ie no transfer to the other fabrics. .... But Since there will be shedding of the unfixed dye... I would not do light and dark values in the same Retayne solution. It is surprising how much dye is shed at 140 degrees.

  4. #4
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,722
    Quote Originally Posted by amma
    I suggest washing your batiks with laundry soap and very warm water and rinsing them several times first. Removing as much of the wax as possible. Use the same type of detergent you will use to wash the finished quilt.

    I do not use an abundance of this solution when I treat my batiks. I mix up a good amount per instructions, and then thoroughly wet the fabric with it, place it in plastic bags for the time specified, then rinse well and dry.

    I have found you don't need the water over the top of the fabric, or a bit of fabric in a pool of the solution LOL
    As long as the fabric is thoroughly wet with the solution, the Retayne will do it's job :D:D:D

    If you use a lot of batiks or other fabrics that tend to bleed, it doesn't take long to go through a bottle. I like to be thrifty, and using according to the label is pretty wasteful, not to mention using/disposing of more chemical than necessary (thinking green) :D:D:D
    I forgot to mention I was hand washing them with detergant and rinsing with warm water after soaking them for a good 20 minutes (forgive me for missing details...I think my brain is still scrambled from yesterday's carnival rides).

    What kind of plastic bags do you use? I mean the water has to be 140 degrees for the solution to work so I'd be worried that it would melt the bag.

  5. #5
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,722
    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S
    The instructions for Retayne call for the water to be over 140 degrees to be effective. You only need enough water to cover the fabric... this creates a stronger solution ratio and is most effective. I do mine on the stove so I can maintain 140 degrees and use a small pot ( less water)
    That being said the fabrics that you treat will shed dye in the process. I have done similiar colors and similiar value at the same time .... and had good results ie no transfer to the other fabrics. .... But Since there will be shedding of the unfixed dye... I would not do light and dark values in the same Retayne solution. It is surprising how much dye is shed at 140 degrees.
    Your method is exactly what I was thinking about doing it. Tomorrow I planned on picking up a small pot and a candy themometer.

  6. #6
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,111
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have food bags that can be sealed, frozen and boiled :D:D:D

  7. #7
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,722
    They have bags you can boil?

  8. #8
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,111
    Blog Entries
    1
    Yes, fill with food, seal, freeze, throw in boiling water to reheat or cook the food :D:D:D

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.