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Thread: Printing on freezer paper.

  1. #1
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    Can someone tell me how to print on freezer paper for applique shapes. Thank you so much :thumbup:

  2. #2
    Super Member fabric_fancy's Avatar
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    you can either run it thru an ink jet printer or trace the shape onto the dull side on the freezer paper and then iron the shiny side of the freezer paper.

  3. #3
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by fabric_fancy
    you can either run it thru an ink jet printer or trace the shape onto the dull side on the freezer paper and then iron the shiny side of the freezer paper.
    Um, shouldn't she be ironing the freezer paper to something BEFORE she puts it through her printer? And ironing the shiny side of the freezer paper? Not so great for the iron. ;-)

    Two options:

    You can iron the freezer paper to paper for stability and so that the wax part isn't exposed to the innards of your printer.

    Just make sure you know which way the paper has to go in (freezer on top or bottom). I always forget as I print on multiple printers. I always end up doing a test first - big red x on blank piece, and then see which side gets printed on so I know now to stack the FP sheets in the paper tray.

    The other option is to iron the freezer paper to fabric, and print on the fabric side (a la Inklingo) - again, depending on the way you do applique, you can have it print of the right or wrong side of the fabric. This already has the outline printed on the fabric, and you can just cut the shape adding a seam allowance.

  4. #4
    Super Member fabric_fancy's Avatar
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    [quote=MTS]
    Quote Originally Posted by fabric_fancy
    you can either run it thru an ink jet printer or trace the shape onto the dull side on the freezer paper and then iron the shiny side of the freezer paper.

    Um, shouldn't she be ironing the freezer paper to something BEFORE she puts it through her printer? And ironing the shiny side of the freezer paper? Not so great for the iron. ;-)


    you misunderstood everything i was trying to say.

    i didn't mean for her to put paper and fabric thru the printer - just the paper and i didn't mean for her to press the iron to the shiny side either.

    i thought my message was clear but i guess it wasn't, sorry you didn't understand what i was trying to say.

  5. #5
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I agree, I wouldn't put the freezer paper through without affixing it to something first. All you need is to iron the shiny side to the top 1/4" edge of a piece of copy paper :D:D:D

  6. #6
    Super Member bluteddi's Avatar
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    hmmm I've alway free hand or traced pics onto my freezer paper. I've never thought to run it thru my printer.

    But , I draw my designs on the dull side reverse image - if directional is important)and iron the glossy side onto the wrong side of the fabric.

    Happy appliqueing!!

  7. #7
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    Here's what I do:

    Draw shapes on dull side of freezer paper. Stack 5 additional sheets of freezer paper underneath, all with dull side up. Iron around the outer edges of the freezer paper to glue all the stacks together. Cut out the drawn shapes with scissors. This means I get 6 shapes for every one I draw and cut.

    If I were to use a printer for the shapes, I think this is what I would do. Print shapes on lightweight typing paper. Use a glue stick to affix to the dull side of a sheet of freezer paper. Stack 5 additional sheets of freezer paper underneath, and proceed as above.

    6 sheets of freezer paper is the max for me in order to keep the cutting accurate.

  8. #8
    MTS
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    The point of using the freezer paper through the printer (either attached to a blank sheet or fabric) is because the pattern/motif/shape/image is ALREADY stored on your computer.

    Yes, one could print it out, trace it onto the freezer paper and then cut it out. But it's way it's way easier to do it in one-step (whether I'm printing on the FP or fabric/Inklingo).

    You can still cut out stacks after you print the accurate image on the first page (if you need multiple copies).

    If one is doing a free-form original drawing by hand, then a printer isn't even needed.

  9. #9
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    Thank you so much so far all info has been helpful, I need to make 380 petals and 40 some leaves didn't want to have to trace each one.

  10. #10
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    use scotch tape to fix top of FP piece to normal printer paper, or attach to printer paper by just ironing the top 1/2" or so of the FP. Place it FP side down in copier and let 'er rip!

    I do one at a time and you can easily use the same few printer paper pages and attach more FP.

    If the shapes are small enough, make a copy page with several of them on it, then copy to FP.

    Good luck!

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