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Thread: Question about quilting distances

  1. #1
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    Question about quilting distances

    I'm working on quilting my first quilt right now, and I have a possibly dumb question about how close together I need to quilt. My batting says I can quilt up to 6 inches apart. The quilt is a square and I'm quilting it in wavy diagonal lines. I'd planned to do just the diagonals (which are about 1.5 inches apart), but now I'm worried that I need to have at least some crossing lines of quilting to cover the long, narrow parts between the wavy lines. The piecing is done in concentric squares, so I could conceivably outline each square without interfering with the look I"m going for. But do I need to do that?

    Reading this, I know I sound incoherent, so I'm going to try to boil my question down. Basically, when they give quilting distances, does that mean in all directions?

  2. #2
    Power Poster erstan947's Avatar
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    It seems to me that you have it quilted close enough. I read the packaging as in a 6" square you need to have some quilting.....you have that covered very well. Can't wait to see a photo of your quilt....happy quilting!

  3. #3
    Power Poster RedGarnet222's Avatar
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    It is depending on the design really. The main point of quilting is to reinforce those seams that would get more wear from the intersecting seams making them stand proud and thus wear quicker. But, I am sure you knew that part. If your gut is telling you that certain areas need more, go for it. The more quilting that is on the quilt the more stiff it becomes, so it is a matter of choice when it comes to that too. If the quilt is one that will see lots of wear, I would do a little more. That is what I like about quilting, the quilt often tells you what it needs and then the creative side says, "Just a little here would look nice".
    It is all your choice. But, for me, form follows function just like decorating your house.
    Last edited by RedGarnet222; 03-21-2013 at 09:05 AM.
    RedGarnet222

    "Take your needle, my child, and work at your pattern ... It will come out a rose by and by. Life is like that ...one stitch at a time, taken patiently."
    *Oliver Wendell Holms

  4. #4
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    The main point of quilting is not to reinforce seams. The main point of quilting is to keep the batting from shifting and lumping. If it says "up to 6 inches apart" they mean in all directions. Quilting close may or may not make a quilt stiff. That is also dependent on the batting you are using. Scrimmed battings, like Warm and Natural get stiff with more quilting. Needle punched battings don't get all that stiff with closer quilting. Some battings don't get stiff unless you're doing micro stippling.

  5. #5
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    if you are doing 1.5 inch lines apart, no need to go in the other direction also. unless you want to.

  6. #6
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    I typically do my quilting 3" - 4" apart in any given direction. If yours is 1.5" I don't see a need to go back the other way unless that is the look you are wanting to achieve.

  7. #7
    Super Member justflyingin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mom-6 View Post
    . If yours is 1.5" I don't see a need to go back the other way unless that is the look you are wanting to achieve.
    I think so too.

  8. #8
    Senior Member petthefabric's Avatar
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    I quilted one on the diagonal, all one direction. It tweeked the quilt slightly so it doesn't hang straight. I'd quilt in a grid pattern to have diagonal in both directions.

  9. #9
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    Petthefabric - did you try pulling the opposite corners of your finished quilt like you would do for straightening the grain of fabric? It should correct that slight off kilter look you mentioned.

  10. #10
    Super Member knlsmith's Avatar
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    When doing diaginal only (and that's fine it will work) just remember to start each row on opposite ends, quilt each line in opposite direction. It will keep it frm getting cat-wompous. If it does get crooked, before you put on binding, you can block the quilt if it's bothering you.


    Quote Originally Posted by petthefabric View Post
    I quilted one on the diagonal, all one direction. It tweeked the quilt slightly so it doesn't hang straight. I'd quilt in a grid pattern to have diagonal in both directions.

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