Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Question for Machine Applique Quilters

  1. #1
    Super Member Treasureit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    OC, CA
    Posts
    2,852

    Question for Machine Applique Quilters

    I have made quite a few applique quilts for my grandchildren...using machine applique...now after they have used and washed these quilts....I am getting requests for repairs. Mostly on the ones I have used the satin stitch. They are falling off or parts of them are.

    I used fusible backing and used the satin decorative stitch on my machine. They look nice and secure when I am done, but I wonder if the satin stitch isn't actually weakening the fabric and cutting it. The stitches are still there...the applique is lifting.

    Have any of you experienced this and what do you do to fix the problem from happening again?

  2. #2
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    4,694
    Blog Entries
    1
    Yes, I have experienced this, and you probably won't like my answer. I switched applique methods. I no longer satin stitch. Most of the time I turn under and hand stitch, using the freezer-paper-and-starch method of turning under. If I DO machine stitch the applique, I use a button hole stitch. You can use fusible, but in my experience the fusible doesn't always stay fused after washings.

    eta: it occurred to me that you could use a firm stabilizer on the back of the fabric, but you'd end up with stiff appliques, unless you cut out the centers after stitching. In my opinion though, it would be easier to hand stitch, or machine button hole stitch.
    Last edited by Peckish; 10-24-2012 at 08:05 AM.

  3. #3
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    4,607
    When doing the satin stitch make sure the whole stitch covers the appliqué itself, just the outer zag should go onto the background. I've been using the satin stitch for years too and haven't had that complaint (yet). Hopefully it'll be an easy fix for you, also I usually use at least 2.5 stitch length with a .4 so it is quite compact.

  4. #4
    Super Member Treasureit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    OC, CA
    Posts
    2,852
    Peggi...have you had any problem with the hand applique coming apart after washing...not that I will do this because I am still working on my first hand applique quilt that I started about 4 years ago. My 12 grandchildren would be parents themselves before I finished them!

  5. #5
    Super Member JulieR's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Emmitsburg, MD
    Posts
    1,603
    You know, for this reason I haven't yet been brave enough to use machine applique on one of the kids' quilts. I'm using either needle turn or raw edge w/ a straight stitch for wallhangings for Christmas, but I was afraid of exactly the result you're seeing if I added applique to a quilt that would be washed a lot.

    I'll be watching for more replies...

  6. #6
    Super Member Vanuatu Jill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Ramona, California
    Posts
    3,057
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have done some machine appliqué, though Most I hand appliqué. I was thinking when you use a satin stitch, do you start off by back-tacking to lock your stitch at the beginning (as you near the starting point after satin stitching around, you cover that back stitching anyway) and especially back stitch with a straight stitch at the end to lock? I don't think a satin stitch locks if you only back stitch with the satin stitch. Hope this makes sense and if I am wrong, someone correct me!!

  7. #7
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Cadillac, MI
    Posts
    6,583
    Blog Entries
    19
    I've only satin stitched one quilt, but I've done a lot of children's clothes with the same machine. They were washed repeated and never came undone. Was your needle sharp? I'm more concerned about the flowers I buttonhole stitched, but my daughter says they are doing okay so far.

    Treasureit, your avatar prompted me to make an appliqued panel in my daughter's quilt. At the time I posted the picture, I couldn't remember your name, so I didn't give you the credit you deserve. Thank you. K loves her quilt and that panel is what makes it special.
    Last edited by irishrose; 10-24-2012 at 09:08 AM.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    28
    When I machine applique, I used fusible interfacing. Cut it out the same shape as your appliqué. Put the right side of fabric to the fusible side of interfacing, and sew around the perimeter. Cut a slit in the interfacing, and turn it inside out and finger press it, and push the corners out. The right side of fabric is up, and the fusible side is down. Press the applique piece in the correct position on your block or quilt, so that is fuses to the base fabric. Then, I use a blanket stitch to sew the edges down. And, as in the case of leaves, I use a decorative stitch down the center . Carolyn

  9. #9
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    18,942
    I have never had any appliqué that I satin stitched come off but I haven't used it on children's quilt that are laundered often. I have used my buttonhole stitch with wonderunder on a couple. They have not come off but I notice with washing that the edges look kind of frayed. They may need a repair in the future. I would just trace the piece that came off and appliqué by hand or raw edge appliqué/quilt in a new piece.

  10. #10
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,582
    Blog Entries
    1
    I think the cause of this problem is satin stitching that is very tight. I have noticed when I do satin stitching that is very close together, the needle holes in the applique are so close together that inevitably a lot of the applique fibers are going to be damaged. It's almost as if the satin stitching cuts the fabric. That is why the applique ends up lifting right at the stitching line of the satin stitch. The fibers under the satin stitching are still there, but they have separated from the body of the applique.

    The best solution, I think, is to change to a different type of stitch, such as the blind hem. Or, widen and lengthen the satin stitch so the stitches are not so close together. Another alternative is to do two rows of stitching, both with lengthened stitches. The first round is not as wide; the second round with a widened stitch covers up the first round. That way at least the needle holes are not right next to each other.

    A different needle might help also. For example, a ballpoint needle is supposed to "push" the fibers apart where as a sharp needle will pierce the fibers. I think it is the repeated piercing of the fibers so close together that is weakening the fabric.

    Possibly a different fusible would help also -- one that is more permanent. Regular Steam-a-Seam I noticed stays adhered very well, but it is pretty stiff.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.