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Thread: Question on pinning a quilt.

  1. #11
    Senior Member barb55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeeNana
    Google Sharon Schambers. She has a video where you can use boards to roll up the quilt. She used it for basting but it may work for pinning as well. If you can contact a local quilt quild they usually have someone who has a frame that your quilt could be put on. Maybe some of the ladies will help. Nice chance to meet other quilters.
    Having a large table like at a senior center or library. Even some churches have social halls where you can put more than one table together helps.
    This really works. I got the tables and the bords and pined a king this way . I even got to set down while doing it. This was the easiest way I have ever pined a quilt. Got too old to get down on the floor

  2. #12
    Afton's Avatar
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    I just learned a lot!

  3. #13
    Super Member amazon's Avatar
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    I crease the center of each layer at the top, bottom and side edges about an inch in, then I tape mine to the floor with masking tape,on the edge of the backing.I pull it rather taut. Then I tape the cotton batting with about (4) one inch pieces of tape per side , Then I layout my top. Align all of my centers and tape down the top using less tape than on the backing and then I use the little gardening kneeling pads under my knees and pin about every 6 to 8 inches.The safety pins glide right across the linenoleum.Once its pinned , I pull off tape layer by layer and have never had a wrinkle. One of the advantages of taping is you can walk on your sandwich layers to smooth out all wrinkles.

  4. #14
    Member velvor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amazon
    I crease the center of each layer at the top, bottom and side edges about an inch in, then I tape mine to the floor with masking tape,on the edge of the backing.I pull it rather taut. Then I tape the cotton batting with about (4) one inch pieces of tape per side , Then I layout my top. Align all of my centers and tape down the top using less tape than on the backing and then I use the little gardening kneeling pads under my knees and pin about every 6 to 8 inches.The safety pins glide right across the linenoleum.Once its pinned , I pull off tape layer by layer and have never had a wrinkle. One of the advantages of taping is you can walk on your sandwich layers to smooth out all wrinkles.
    Yes, this is how I do it too! Another use for good old duct tape! I find that the more I smooth the layers and use lots of tape it all works out very well. (Now, I just need to get up from the floor!) :)

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa_wanna_b_quilter
    I do it backwards.

    Put the BATTING on the floor or table. Smooth it out. (The batting seems to sit still better for me.)
    Lay the BACKING on top of that. (I find I get the wrinkles out of the backing better when I can see it.) Pin as needed.
    Flip it all over and put the top on. Smooth it out and pin.
    You can then remove the pins from the backing that only went through the batting and the backing.

    This also works very well for me with spray basting.
    I love this idea! I am going to try that on my next larger quilt.

  6. #16
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    I am unable to pin on the floor due to my back and knees so I use my cutting table (from Joann). I use binder clips to clip the backing to the table. This keeps the backing nice and taut but not stretched. Also, if I have a quilt larger than the table it makes it easier to do the pinning section by section.

    Also, binder clips are easy to find and not expensive. I use the medium sized ones.

  7. #17
    Super Member
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    I would suggest seeing if your local church or fire house has tables you could use. Push 2 together long sides together. Go to the office supply store and get a box of large binder clips. Get your backing centered and clamp with the clips; repeat with batting; repeat with top, smoothing all as you go. Pin the entire area and then shift the whole lot around as needed. I usually just use my cutting table for this process and I've done from wallhangings to queen size this way. But I have a roll of batting and it's too bulky in my small sewing room to do large quilts so I now head off to the fire house for those projects.

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