Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Questions about classes

  1. #1
    Super Member AshleyR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    1,099
    Blog Entries
    30
    I bought a "new" embriodery machine on Saturday, and took it to the Sew N Vac place to see what accessories I had to get. The gentleman there was very helpful and got me started on my new toy. Of course, he let me know that if I'd buy a machine from them, free classes for life!

    I showed him pictures of my quilt (http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-162720-1.htm ) and he asked me if I'd be interested in teaching hand-quilting class. I told him I'd LOVE it!

    We didn't discuss money or anything like that. I think he is going to talk it over with the owners and maybe some customers and put out his feelers.

    But I was thinking.. what on Earth would I do? I've never been to a class of this type so I don't know how they work. I assume everyone would bring a project -or we provide one? How long do they typically last? If you've taken a class like this, what did you like? What would you change? ANY suggestions are welcome!

  2. #2
    dd
    dd is offline
    Super Member dd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,406
    This is my experience. First give them or have them make a sandwich so they can practice hand quilting. Make it into a potholder. Never used mine it just hung in the kitchen. I have done this with GS leaders. Have them mark it and quilt it and bind it. It should be finished by the next class.
    At the next class teach them to make the patterns, trace them, mark the seam allowance,pin them and how to stitch it together.
    I made my first square that wound up a quilt as you go quilt. The rest of the class made a pillow. I already knew how to make a pillow.
    Feel free to PM me if you want any more info on how I did it.

  3. #3
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Holland, PA
    Posts
    3,890
    I taught quilting for a while in a Sew N Vac shop when I retired from teaching. I would start them with putting a potholder sandwich together. Sessions usually lasted 1 hour. However, if you have any allergies, the environment might be a problem for you as they fix broken vacs.

  4. #4
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    western NY formerly MN, FL, NC, SC
    Posts
    32,825
    Blog Entries
    15
    what a wonderful opportunity for you!

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    940
    See what the level of experience is for the group you would be teaching. Going over the very basics at the first class would be helpful --- would answer many questions that perhaps some would be afraid (or embarrassed) to ask...what kind of needle and why? what kind of thread and why? frame? hoop? lap? different techniques (stab stitching vs. running stitch). different methods of marking, etc. A few shops around here offer a beginner hand-quilting class, and it is done in 4 to 6 sessions.

  6. #6
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,383
    A couple of thoughts:
    -Bring in some samples of your work to give them inspiration
    -Talk about the needles you use and why
    -Discuss threads - the kind used in your samples, how colored threads can change the completed piece
    -Stencils - how to mark fabric and the products that can be used to mark and what products might not work a well
    -How a quilting design can change the appearance of a quilt. For example a Baptist Fan will give a different "mood" to a quilt than cross hatching
    -The battings that are easiest for hand quilting and why
    -How big should the back and batting be in relation to the top
    -Ways to baste the quilt sandwich

  7. #7
    Super Member AshleyR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    1,099
    Blog Entries
    30
    Thanks to EVERYONE for all the suggestions! I have printed this page up and will start getting ready with this as a guideline!! DD, I might be PM'ing you too!!

  8. #8
    dd
    dd is offline
    Super Member dd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,406
    Quote Originally Posted by AshleyR View Post
    Thanks to EVERYONE for all the suggestions! I have printed this page up and will start getting ready with this as a guideline!! DD, I might be PM'ing you too!!
    Feel free anytime. I'll help as best I can. Good luck. Too bad we're not closer.
    Blessed are the quilters, for they are the piecemakers.

  9. #9
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sturbridge, Ma
    Posts
    4,017
    I have a different philosophy about teaching hand quilting which works after literally 100's of students over the years.
    I would be glad to give you suggestions and details.
    However, to start. The students are there to learn to hand quilt. All the other information can come later if the classes go for several sessions.
    I spend less than 1/2 hr talking about tools etc and then get them to needle and thread. I provide a kit of my batting of choice with backing and 1/8" gingham check and #8 needle and black thread and thimble and demonstrate the stitch and get them going. I also use the Morgan No Slip 14" hoop.

  10. #10
    Member calicoquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    56
    I have taken Holice's hand quilting class. It was very helpful to have the gingham check to help keep the stitches straight and even. The non slip hoop is also helpful in that you don't have to keep pulling on the fabric.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.