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Thread: Is this quilt repairable?

  1. #1
    Member designsforyou's Avatar
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    We had a customer ask us if we could possibly repair this quilt. The blocks were made by her and are estimated to be 75 to 100 years old and at some point have been machine quilted since. We realize it will be next to impossible to match the material colors and patterns, as well as the machine quilting pattern. However the customer just wanted to know if somehow similar material and patterns could be peiced into the places with the holes. The pictures are just two of the holes in the quilt.
    Any suggestions will be appriciated.
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  2. #2
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    Yes, you could cut out fabrics of similar color/pattern in the same shape and do a machine applique right over the hole. Put a small piece of batting in the middle of the hole, and it can be done.

  3. #3
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    I'll bet that whole quilt was a beauty and worth trying to mend. Maybe draw a template of the diamond shape and background allowing for your 1/4" seam and "paperpiece" the shape then applique over the holes, adding batting where needed. That is quite a job when the hole goes all the way through. I've done pieces for fronts and if you get lucky with your fabric it is hard to spot where the repairs are done. Good luck finding fabric near what has been used. I hope they really love the quilt because it seems as if it would be not only time consuming but expensive as well. I would show how you are going to repair it beforehand to be sure the owner knows how it is going to look. It will be very satisfying when it is complete.

  4. #4
    mim
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    Super Member mim's Avatar
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    Yes -- the quilt means a lot to her -- I just repaired and handquilted one that I would have junked if I had found it -- BUT -- it meant a lot to the person who owned it. How many "antiques / heirlooms" have you seen that you wouldn't give 2 cents for?? value, like beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I would find a print with similar values to repair it with

    Good luck to you both

    Mim
    Quote Originally Posted by designsforyou
    We had a customer ask us if we could possibly repair this quilt. The blocks were made by her and are estimated to be 75 to 100 years old and at some point have been machine quilted since. We realize it will be next to impossible to match the material colors and patterns, as well as the machine quilting pattern. However the customer just wanted to know if somehow similar material and patterns could be peiced into the places with the holes. The pictures are just two of the holes in the quilt.
    Any suggestions will be appriciated.

  5. #5
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    If your customer made these blocks and they are 100 years old - how old is your customer? That is hard to believe. I would research 75 to 100 year old fabric. This looks too modern to me. That said, it should be easy to find a close match for fabric as those colors are made today. Appliqueing pieces on would be the best way to fix it.

  6. #6
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    How many through holes are there? What will the customer do with the quilt after the repair is made, use it or display it? What condition is the rest of the fabric, really fragile or OK?
    I would consider a whole new back to support the quilt, and probably tie with matching floss. you can insert pieces of batting and re piece the holes or applique something over the hole, as long as the surrounding fabric will support the applique. If it's really fragile, the applique could put additional stress on it.
    Wost case, could the quilt be cut to a smaller size throw or maybe smaller pieces could be framed?
    I also want to know how old the customer is if the blocks could be 100!

  7. #7
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    Of course it is repairable if you want to put in the work and the customer will pay for it. I am sure you can somewhat match the fabric but do you want to take on the task?

    After looking at it again, I'm not sure you can find matching fabric unless you go to someone who has vintage fabric. It appears to be dress fabric.

  8. #8
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    I once repaired an old family heirloom quilt for a friend. It had a huge tear and hole. They weren't concerned about its monetary value, so a little less pressure for me. There was enough large pieces of fabric in other areas of the quilt, so I photographed them and brightened the image. I then did a photo transfer to fabric and cut the pieces I needed from that. Little bit of a PITA, but it did what my friend wanted.

  9. #9
    Member designsforyou's Avatar
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    Sorry, I made a typo! I meant to say it was made by HER MOM. The customer is an 80 y/o lady, and it has a lot of sentimental value to her. EXCUSE me for the typing error.

  10. #10
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barb44
    If your customer made these blocks and they are 100 years old - how old is your customer? That is hard to believe. I would research 75 to 100 year old fabric. This looks too modern to me. That said, it should be easy to find a close match for fabric as those colors are made today. Appliqueing pieces on would be the best way to fix it.
    I had the same thoughts when I saw the fabric.

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