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Thread: Recycling Hints for quilters and sewers

  1. #1
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    1. Used lint roller sheets. When they won't pick up lint and stuff anymore off my quilt tops, I use them to wipe off the flat surfaces of my sewing area, window sills, lamp shades. They still have enough stickiness to work. Might try it on the cat next!

    2. Empty flushable wipe boxes. The ones with flat tops are the best. I use them for storing small quilting and sewing notions. I print out lables for the contents or use a permanent marker either on the top or sides depending on how they are stored.

    3. Used fabric softener sheets. I am a gardener so I save them until I have a bunch and then sew them together creating row covers for my garden. I use thread from almost empty spools and bobbins. You would be surprised at how much row fabric you can create with these dryer sheets. I have not tried this, but a few might be used to add to stuffing for pillows and toys.

  2. #2
    Super Member Grama Lehr's Avatar
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    #2. The empty boxes are excellent for storing crayons, markers, colored pencils for the Grandkids!!

  3. #3
    Super Member sewwhat85's Avatar
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    great ideas

  4. #4
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    this is probably a really dumb question, but do you use the row covers to prevent weeds? what exactly are they for? I really like the idea and will start saving them.

    I save all the little snippets and scraps in a container and when it gets full I put them in an old pillow case. I tie the pillowcase closed with a hair tie. Makes a great cat/dog bed. I use the hair tie so I can keep adding to it.

  5. #5
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Crop or floating row covers are placed directly over newly planted plants or seeded rows being careful to leave enought slack to allow for growth. The row covers provide extra warmth, protects from light frosts and accelerates growth. It also protects plantings from flying insect damage. The fabric is loose enough to freely pass air and water so it does not require special ventilation or watering. The row cover fabric can be anchored down with a light sprinkling of soil along the edges. Since I live on a "Pile of Rocks" I have also use rocks. I use prefer to use "fabric staples" recycled from wire hangers to hold my fabric down. If you are interested I will post instructions on how to make the hangers.

  6. #6
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    What a clever use for the dryer sheets. Thanks for all the info.

  7. #7
    Super Member merry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caroline S
    Crop or floating row covers are placed directly over newly planted plants or seeded rows being careful to leave enought slack to allow for growth. The row covers provide extra warmth, protects from light frosts and accelerates growth. It also protects plantings from flying insect damage. The fabric is loose enough to freely pass air and water so it does not require special ventilation or watering. The row cover fabric can be anchored down with a light sprinkling of soil along the edges. Since I live on a "Pile of Rocks" I have also use rocks. I use prefer to use "fabric staples" recycled from wire hangers to hold my fabric down. If you are interested I will post instructions on how to make the hangers.
    Please post, very interested

    :thumbup:

  8. #8
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    This was the last wire hanger that I could find otherwise I would have shown the progressive steps. Grab the neck of the hanger and pull it so that the neck is at one end and a bend is at the other. Cut the neck off with wire cutters and then the bottom bend in the middle. You will now have two staples with approx 8 inch legs. Leave the staple in the "V" shape and squeeze it the legs so they are parallel when you push it through the cloth into to soil. The spring of the legs will hold the soil better.You can also straigten the wire and rebend it to form a larger top but the legs will be shorter.

    Wire clothes hanger cut
    Name:  Attachment-118955.jpe
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Size:  16.6 KB

  9. #9
    Super Member merry's Avatar
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    Great idea Caroline! Thanks for showing me. Will put both to good use this spring.

  10. #10
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    I like the empty plastic boxes from Swiffer mop cloths. They are just right for leftover binding, small spools of thread, small projects, etc. They also have a clear plastic lid so you can see what's in them. Have a little stuffed bunny (top half) that I have used for a pincushion for a long time.

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