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Thread: Request to teach - suggestions please

  1. #1
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    I have had people who have asked if I give classes on how to quilt, others on how to sew, and other to teach them about quilting. I've often thought about it.
    To do a "Just very beginners' class to get them started and then on to other things.
    I have several things in mind and some already written out, but not in any order yet.

    Any suggestions of:
    1) what to teach in a very "I don't know a thing about quilting" class?
    2)What do you wish you would have learned in the very beginning that would have be helpful?
    3) Tips, references etc will be much appreciated.

    Thanks
    Phyllis
    QuiltingGrannie
    (quilter, longarmer, designer --- teacher?) :thumbup:

  2. #2
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Your pieces may not fit together because of three basic issues
    1)it's cut wrong
    2) it's sewn wrong
    3) it's pressed wrong
    So I would teach basic rotary cutting skills, how to achieve that mysterious scant 1/4" and how to press.
    Have them make a 9patch that alternates with a plain block, add a few borders and bind.

  3. #3
    Super Member michelehuston's Avatar
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    A log cabin is a great one to start with!

  4. #4
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    I agree on the log cabin. There are so many different ways to lay it out! For your first meeting, you could meet at a fabric store at a pre-determined time to help with fabric selection, pattern, supplies, etc...

  5. #5
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    I taught quilting/sewing for a while after retiring from school teaching. For someone that has never sewn before I would teach 9 patch pot holder. If they want to sew clothing, pajamas. If they have used a sewing machine that I would let them pick one of the small quilts/toppers from the book "More Quilts for Baby". In 5 one hr. classes, I could teach - most important, how to read instructions one step at a time & rotary cutting, piecing, sandwiching, quilting, & binding.

  6. #6
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    I taught quilting/sewing for a while after retiring from school teaching. For someone that has never sewn before I would teach 9 patch pot holder. If they want to sew clothing, pajamas. If they have used a sewing machine that I would let them pick one of the small quilts/toppers from the book "More Quilts for Baby". In 5 one hr. classes, I could teach - most important, how to read instructions one step at a time & rotary cutting, piecing, sandwiching, quilting, & binding.

  7. #7
    AVQuilter's Avatar
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    My friend and I do a class once a month and we have the pattern cut and ready to sew...these ladies have some experience and others quilte a lot. We talk about what they are doing and why...gets them going at a good pace.

  8. #8

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    The beginners class I took almost 20 years ago was a 4 block sampler. Ohio star, Lemoyne star, Drunkeds path, and a Dresden plate. Each block built a skill. Piecing, points, curves, paper piecing. Then putting it together and quilting it. It was all done by hand but it could be a machine class.

  9. #9
    Super Member Sandee's Avatar
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    I think a Log cabin is a great 1st project. Even if all seams aren't perfect, they still look very nice when done.

    I've made about 50 quilts, & I haven't learned to cut binding or bind yet. Wish I had learned in 1 of the 2 clases I took.

  10. #10
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
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    I am new to quilting, and my biggest disappointment in the classes I took was bringing home a barely started quilt and trying to figure out how to finish it on my own. Sometimes, if someone (teacher) has been quilting for years, something that seems to be so obvious is not. Please encourage students to share even the "stupidest" questions.

    I would suggest a project that could be completed during the class, so a new quilter has that excitement about making something they can feel proud of. This will inspire them to take more classes, and continue working at home on their own. Donna Jean suggested a potholder. That is a great idea. It could be completed during class and has all the basic techniques, especially if using binding to finish it. It would cost much less than a full quilt also.

    I think if a project cannot be completed during the class it should be clearly stated, "This is a class to begin to learn about quilting techniques, and the project may not be completed during the class."

    I also think it's wonderful when a teacher is willing to go "above and beyond" by allowing students to contact her later.

    I think a beginning class should have a limited amount of students so they get a lot of "one on one" instruction. It is helpful to ask the students to be familiar with their machine, and bring the manual for it. I have taken classes where the majority of the time is trying to get someone's machine to work.

    I think it's great you are asking for tips. I didn't know there was a 1/4" foot for my machine, and when I found out, after messing up several seams (I tried measuring and laying down painter tape.) my hubby went and bought it and brought it to me. It was SO helpful, and I was more confident about continuing the project. My point is, it probably was obvious to experienced sewers but I had not heard of it. Some people really do not know about things that seem so elementary.

    You are asking for suggestions, so I feel you will be a great teacher!

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