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Thread: Serger machines

  1. #1
    Super Member Minda's Avatar
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    I've been looking at sergers, but I'm not sure what to buy. Please everyone, let me know what brands you like and also what features to look for. Thanks, in advance, for your help. :-)

  2. #2
    bbwalkup's Avatar
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    Hey there. I have one serger, and I just love it to death!! I have a Kenmore. When I told my husband I wanted one, he went nuts reading up on all kinds of forums and consumer reports about different brands and all. Together we learned so much about them before even buying one. Prices will from $300 to $3000 (which is up to your budget) threads can go from 3 spools to 10 ( I haven't figured those out yet). With my Kenmore the features I love so much are the suction cups on the feet to hold it to the table (these machines are fast and without those will bounce!!) the weight is nice and heavy, but I can easily pick it up to put it away. And it's easy to open to clean out.
    When you do make a decision about one and purchase it. Play with it!!! I was scared to death to change the thread (mine came prethreaded) but if I did it, anyone can. Most of the forums will talk about people who buy an expensive serger, get scared of it and put in the box and back to the closet. After hearing that I was determined to learn how to use it! We have cats and I tried leaving my serger out and ready to use, but I noticed one cat actually chewing on the tread (I was not amused). Luckly, I had bought a good carrier for it, so when I'm not using it, I do put it away. We paid under $500 for mine, which does exactly what I was looking for. There are so many brands and features it all depends on what you want, but if you start off small you can always work your way up. Lots of shops will let you try them out...that's always a big plus. And buy a book, I found a wonderful book which is not specific to any one brand, she talks about everything from fears to different threads how to make each stitch look correctly.

    Good luck and tell us what you end up getting!!

  3. #3
    Norah's Avatar
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    I have a Singer 4 thread serger that I really like, but the next one I buy will have the stitch regulators on the outside instead of in the body. My sewing instructor told me that the outside ones allow for a larger variety of threads, including novelty threads. Also there are some that allow flat, decorative seams such as you see on tee shirts and such. Mine can't do that.

  4. #4
    Super Member sewmuch's Avatar
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    Hi, I have a Janome 4 thread serger. My husband bought it off the
    internet, Ebay, I believe, very inexpensive. I like it, don't do a
    whole lot w/it yet, as I am to busy quilting. But it does come in
    handy at times. I have not mastered threading yet, my hubby
    is great at that. Mine came prethreaded also.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Sewsweet's Avatar
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    When rethreading your serger leve it threaded, just cut the thread at the spool, put your new thread on. Take the old and new thread and tie a knot now cut off any tail of long thread (do all four at once) run the serger and the thread will go all the way through , you will have to thread the needles the knots wont go through the eye.

    I have a Singer, (Four thread) never had a problem with it .

  6. #6
    Super Member sewmuch's Avatar
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    Thanks good advice. I meant to give 5 stars for you.

  7. #7
    Super Member Minda's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for all your help. I've never even used a serger so I appreciate knowing what to look for. I'm not very good with instructions so my daughter will be the one to figure out how to use it (and then show me.) Thanks again, all.

    Minda

  8. #8

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    Thanks girls for all your help. I will let you know what type of serger I get.
    teddybear

  9. #9
    gr8tchr4u's Avatar
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    My "old reliable" is a Brother, belive it or not, made in the early 1990's. It has had the pedal replaced and been serviced for cleanings a few times, but keeps right on going. I can thread it in my sleep and diagnose most of the problems a serger can have! :) A serger brand I am NOT fond of is a New Home Babylock - the type my mother has. My dad meant well when he bought it for her but never did the research. Never have I seen such a fussy, picky machine. I find it one of the MOST difficult to thread and maintain. It is nice that you don't have to use another foot & throat plate for rolled hems like my brother, but the gears are very hard to push and even with different types of thread and much adjusting, it won't keep thread in it - very frustrating for arthritic hands. I'm trying to talk my mother into trading it in on a really nice air-thread serger. Hope this helps.

  10. #10

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    Hi Minda
    I have a Kenmore that “Santa” bought at Sears for $250.00 in 2004; he did not do any research and I was disappointed when I saw it, but... I am so happy with it . I do not sew clothes, but I have been using it to “sew” quick quilts. I did take 3 classes and have all the settings for the different fabrics in a note book; on the second class I learned “heirloom sewing” and made a beautiful baby quilt. On the third I learned how to sew curves and made another quilt. And guess what: in the first class there were people with Janome and some two other very famous brands (I can’t remember which ones) that were exactly the same machines. There was no difference at all other than the name and … the price! The cheapest one was $800.00! Yes, eight hundred! Mine has 4 threads and one MUST is the “differential feed”. Do not buy one without this fixture. I can do so much with it… I actually have tried a couple brands that really do not sew as smooth and well as this one. I am sure that eventually I will buy a better model but this one is great.
    I did have a fantastic teacher that unfortunately moved to Philadelphia. I think it is great to be able to take classes and learn “things” that would not happen if you tried just to follow the book or the video that comes included.
    Lucia


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