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Thread: singer 416

  1. #1
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    singer 416

    I have a chance to buy a Singer 416.
    Is this a good machine for quilting large tops.
    I want to do SITD or other simple straight line patterns.
    Would appreciate any info you can give me about this machine.
    Thanks.
    ranger
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    Life...you muddle your way through it and then you die!

  2. #2
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    I Googled for images. This is a vintage machine, and vintage machines are typically strong. Assuming it is in working condition with all its parts and the price on it is good (around here, a machine like that would sell in a thrift shop for about $30, maybe $40 max), it should fulfill all your requirements. You would probably want to buy a generic walking foot in order to do SITD and other straight line quilting patterns.

    You mentioned "quilting large tops". The problem you run into with vintage sewing machines typically is not whether the machine is strong enough to do quilting, but rather how big the harp is (the flat surface between the needle and the pedestal on the right). Most domestic machines, both vintage and current, have similar harp sizes (around 8"). This means it is not easy to fit half of a large quilt under the arm. In order to get a larger harp size, you would have to move up into an industrial machine or a newer (pricey) machine that has the newer 11" harp size.

    Whether vintage or new, any sewing machine can theoretically do both regular quilting and free-motion quilting.

  3. #3
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    Prism really nailed the answer. Another technique you might want to try for large tops would be quilting in sections. See Marti Michell's book, Machine Quilting in Sections, for several different methods. Doing this, you don't really need a larger harp space.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    I Googled for images. This is a vintage machine, and vintage machines are typically strong. Assuming it is in working condition with all its parts and the price on it is good (around here, a machine like that would sell in a thrift shop for about $30, maybe $40 max), it should fulfill all your requirements. You would probably want to buy a generic walking foot in order to do SITD and other straight line quilting patterns.

    You mentioned "quilting large tops". The problem you run into with vintage sewing machines typically is not whether the machine is strong enough to do quilting, but rather how big the harp is (the flat surface between the needle and the pedestal on the right). Most domestic machines, both vintage and current, have similar harp sizes (around 8"). This means it is not easy to fit half of a large quilt under the arm. In order to get a larger harp size, you would have to move up into an industrial machine or a newer (pricey) machine that has the newer 11" harp size.

    Whether vintage or new, any sewing machine can theoretically do both regular quilting and free-motion quilting.
    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    Prism really nailed the answer. Another technique you might want to try for large tops would be quilting in sections. See Marti Michell's book, Machine Quilting in Sections, for several different methods. Doing this, you don't really need a larger harp space.
    Prism and dunster...thank you for taking the time to reply.
    The price is $70 and the machine has been used just a few times.
    I have done large quilts on my small Brother but it's a wrestling match.
    Sometimes I am not pleased with the results...some bunchiness and sometimes too-tight tension because of drag. Having a smooth, large area to the left of the machine has helped but still have issues.
    Using poly batting doesn't help but the cotton batting is expensive.
    I read somewhere on this board that there is a Singer that has the wide throat area but can't remember the #.
    Perhaps I should save my money and do my quilt in sections.
    I had thought about doing that but wasn't enthused about the extra work but in the end perhaps it would be worth it.
    Again, thanks for the help. It is appreciated.
    ranger
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Life...you muddle your way through it and then you die!

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