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Thread: Starch - Help...Please

  1. #11
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    I starch, let the starch absorb into the fabric for a few minutes and then, while it's still damp from the starch, press dry. I've evolved to using the liquid starch you can mix to varying strengths. If you have lighter-weight fabric, go heavy on the starch. Maybe even doing 2-3 passes if you're using pre-mix.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    I spray until wet and then press. Sometimes repeating. My fabric is stiff as paper before I cut. That's just what I like to do even when I use my Go. If the fabric is low quality and you have to use it, you can fuse lightweight interfacing to it.
    Thank You, I think that I was not using enough starch. I started using more and letting it set a couple minutes, then pressed - working much better.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJ Quilter View Post
    I starch, let the starch absorb into the fabric for a few minutes and then, while it's still damp from the starch, press dry. I've evolved to using the liquid starch you can mix to varying strengths. If you have lighter-weight fabric, go heavy on the starch. Maybe even doing 2-3 passes if you're using pre-mix.
    Thank You. Working much better now.

  4. #14
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DebbieL View Post
    This is gonna seem very silly but I'm getting so frustrated. I am having trouble lining up even the simplest seams. The fabric I am using is definitely on the low quality side & thought starch would help to stabilise the fabric. I guess my question is What is the correct way to use starch? I have tried 'Best Press' & reg. starch. I have been spraying, then pressing (while wet) Is this the wrong way?
    Please tell me the correct way to use starch. What are your methods? Thank You.
    Dried starch will leave the fabric stiff. It will be smooth only if you press while damp (or wet!)
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  5. #15
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJ Quilter View Post
    I starch, let the starch absorb into the fabric for a few minutes and then, while it's still damp from the starch, press dry. I've evolved to using the liquid starch you can mix to varying strengths. If you have lighter-weight fabric, go heavy on the starch. Maybe even doing 2-3 passes if you're using pre-mix.
    A lot of times, I'll dampen (with starch) several pieces, stack them up, fold them up to a smaller size, lay something heavy over them----------cutting board or something similar. Go fix lunch or throw more laundry in the dryer or sew a bit more, then come back to press. The starch is better distributed over the fabric and not too wet in spots.
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  6. #16
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOTTYMO View Post
    I read this before. So I starched my backing for a quilt and put it in the freezer. I found it about 2 weeks later and wondered what this frozen thing was. How long should it stay in the fridge?
    Take it from someone who hates to iron-----------------next to forever. If you want, just roll up for a short time (10-15 minutes) or roll up, slip in a plastic bag and put in the fridge, if you don't intend to iron shortly.

    Also from someone who hates to iron--------------the freezer is for long term storage. No real need if you intend to iron the same day.
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  7. #17
    Power Poster alikat110's Avatar
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    I spray my startch, then wad the fabric up in a tight ball. Then I straighten it out. Let set several minutes, then press. This allows startch to absorb well and evenly.

  8. #18
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I prefer to wet the fabric completely with starch and then let it dry completely, before ironing. I find I get the stiffest results , and no starch build up on the iron.

  9. #19
    Super Member franc36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOTTYMO View Post
    I read this before. So I starched my backing for a quilt and put it in the freezer. I found it about 2 weeks later and wondered what this frozen thing was. How long should it stay in the fridge?
    I am so glad to learn that I am not the only one who puts starched fabric in the freezer before pressing it. I really do think it presses easier when I freeze it first. I did that because I thought that was what my mother did; but actually, she probably just put it in the refrigerator. I leave mine in for an hour or two or overnight. Yes, I, too, have found a bag of frozen fabric in the freezer and wondered what it was.

  10. #20
    Vat
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    I use Sta-Flo starch, you can get it in 1/2 gallons at Walmart. Bring it home and pour into a gallon container and fill with water. Dampen your fabric with water then spray solid with the starch. I like to put mine in the frig over night or all then iron until DRY ! ! ! All of this is before you cut any pieces. You will have less dust (fuzz), less raveling, better matched seams , etc., etc. A much better quilt top, that is my opinion. You cannot do this after pieces are cut because the starch will disstort the pieces.

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