Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 46 of 46

Thread: Starch - Help...Please

  1. #26
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    6,330
    Blog Entries
    1
    I agree with several points made earlier:

    I put a piece of scrap flannel on top of my ironing board. When I'm done starching, the flannel goes into the wash.

    I let the starch soak in to the fabric before pressing. Pressing too soon is what gives you flakes, because the starch is sitting on top of the fabric instead of soaking into it. Spray the starch, then walk away. Put a load of laundry in the washer, or walk out to the mailbox, or have a cookie and some milk.

  2. #27
    Super Member QandE2010's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Florida - formerly Montana
    Posts
    3,495
    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    I agree with several points made earlier:

    I put a piece of scrap flannel on top of my ironing board. When I'm done starching, the flannel goes into the wash.
    I let the starch soak in to the fabric before pressing. Pressing too soon is what gives you flakes, because the starch is sitting on top of the fabric instead of soaking into it. Spray the starch, then walk away. Put a load of laundry in the washer, or walk out to the mailbox, or have a cookie and some milk.
    I like the idea of cookies and milk. I buy the powdered & make the fabric board stiff. Let it dry & 're-dampen & press. Good luck. Stiffly starched fabric is so nice to work with. I recently started searching my backing & what a difference it made.
    Alma
    Nami to 6

  3. #28
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,808
    I am sure that as soon as you thaw it, you can press it. It shouldn't be mildewed or have mold on it if it was frozen. You can use Sta-Flo starch and mix it to your specifications. Try their recommended formula and if that isn't stiff enough to suit you, add more starch and keep spraying and ironing until you get as stiff as you want it to be.

  4. #29
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Norfolk, VA
    Posts
    5,055
    Blog Entries
    1
    I spray, let set a few seconds until it's absorbed and then there's no white residue on the fabric then iron. I use Niagra most of the time 97 cents, can't beat that.
    Judy

  5. #30
    Super Member MacThayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    1,101
    WOW! I have learned more about how to starch from these 3 pages than I did in all my decades of sewing! Thank you ladies! And a big Thank You to the person who asked the question!

    What I've been doing is thoroughly spraying the fabric, folding it up and putting it in a big plastic bag, and then letting it sit for a while, which distributes the starch throughout the fabric. After an hour or so, I press it, and it comes out very nice. So glad to know I can put it in the fridge if I can't get back to pressing it at the right time. Never thought of that!
    Last edited by MacThayer; 04-23-2013 at 04:03 PM.
    MacThayer

  6. #31
    Super Member grandme26's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    Posts
    2,560
    I make my own spray starch using cornstarch. Cornstarch is cheap and I never run out of starch.
    Grandmeto6 aka Judy

  7. #32
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    55
    Hey--does starching help with sewing with slippery fabrics, like lining or silk or satin? Curious to know!

  8. #33
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    984
    Sharon Shamber suggests in one of her videos to spray the back of the fabric and lay that side down against the ironing board and then press the top side, she says this forces the starch into the fabric. I think she's right because it seems when i try and iron the starched side up i get more flaking.

  9. #34
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,197
    Quote Originally Posted by grandme26 View Post
    I make my own spray starch using cornstarch. Cornstarch is cheap and I never run out of starch.
    I'd love to have that recipe. Please share.

  10. #35
    Senior Member gmcsewer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    605
    I like to use Magic Sizing. It makes the fabric feel like new and does not flake off. I get mine at Walmart.

  11. #36
    Super Member DebbE's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,615
    I spray and press on the wrong side of the fabric - so if it flakes a bit it doesn't matter. I like it when it feels like a sheet of paper, as that's when it cuts the best. Used to buy starch, add water and mix and soak my dad's fatiques in it, then iron it dry, as their uniforms had to be extremely crisp when wearing them. Don't think I'd want to go to that length now, but that might be the solution to your problem. Its cheap to buy, and will really make a crisp fabric. One thing to think about though -- if you're having this much trouble with it now, will it hold up in your finished quilt like the rest of the fabrics? I'm thinking probably not.....and it would be a shame to have areas of your finished quilt wear much faster or tear apart. Easier to switch out the fabric now and use a good quality one.

  12. #37
    Super Member feffertim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Desert Hot Springs Ca
    Posts
    2,531
    Blog Entries
    14
    one thing to know. Iron the piece before applying the starch as the starch works better on warm fabric

  13. #38
    Super Member grandme26's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    Posts
    2,560
    Quote Originally Posted by mckwilter View Post
    I'd love to have that recipe. Please share.
    Here is the most recent one i googled
    1 heaping TBS corn starch
    1 pint cold water
    1-2 drops essential oil, optional

    Mix untill cornstarch is disolved. Place in spary bottle and you are ready to go.

    I do it a little different tho, I bring all but 1/4 cup of the water to a boil, I mix the cornstartch in the reserved 1/4 cup of water. When other water comes to a boil I mix together, let cool and then put it is a spray bottle. You can also use a little more of the cornstartch for a stiffer piece of less for a floppy piece.
    Grandmeto6 aka Judy

  14. #39
    Senior Member Pepita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Richmond, TX
    Posts
    430
    Normally when you are going to iron your fabric, you wet it, or starch it, roll it up and put it in a plastic bag. You then put it in the refigerator--not the freezer, and iron it a day later. If you wait week it is just like the week old mystery food, it molds. So leave it in the fridge 1 night-maybe 2 days, and iron.

    If you use spray starch, I suggest turning it over after spraying it as well, but for a different reason. The starch builds up on the top of the cloth and if you iron it it will brown, just like your potatoes in a skillet. If you don't take it off the heat (as in the pan) it burns which is what happens to starch on your iron. So I spray and flip. I also watch my plate of the iron to be sure I am not building up a scorched iron. If you are, get a wash cloth wet it and set it on your ironing board. Then iron the wash cloth, turning it and 'scrubbing' with the cloth. Mine usually go away.
    Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

  15. #40
    Member czgrad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Mims, Fl.
    Posts
    19
    LOL! (on fabric in the freezer). Thanks for that morning laugh.
    I agree with both "quiltinghere" and "scissor queen".
    czgrad

  16. #41
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    537
    Quote Originally Posted by Steady Stiching View Post
    Sharon Shamber suggests in one of her videos to spray the back of the fabric and lay that side down against the ironing board and then press the top side, she says this forces the starch into the fabric. I think she's right because it seems when i try and iron the starched side up i get more flaking.
    I agree. I've been spraying the whole piece (usually a yard or more as it's draped over my ironing board), then bringing the bottom up to the top, and flattening with my hands just to get the starch absorbed into the fabric. Then I unfold it, flip it over, and press till dry. I get nice results this way.

    Before, I was spraying, and immediately pressing the same side, which caused a LOT of flaking (wasted starch not absorbed into the fabric), and the results weren't as good.

  17. #42
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Charleston SC
    Posts
    10,723
    I dampen the fabric with my homemade starch and then press it....If I want a stiffer feel I just make my starch stiffer..It works for me...

  18. #43
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    393
    Quote Originally Posted by Vat View Post
    I use Sta-Flo starch, you can get it in 1/2 gallons at Walmart. Bring it home and pour into a gallon container and fill with water. Dampen your fabric with water then spray solid with the starch. I like to put mine in the frig over night or all then iron until DRY ! ! ! All of this is before you cut any pieces. You will have less dust (fuzz), less raveling, better matched seams , etc., etc. A much better quilt top, that is my opinion. You cannot do this after pieces are cut because the starch will disstort the pieces.
    After being 'scared straight' by this forum I recently washed and ironed all my batiks, and then bought liquid starch to use on other fabrics. I just couldn't remember how to use it... Your way sounds great, but doesn't the starch clog the bottle/nozzle when it dries?

  19. #44
    Super Member topper1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    near Richmond ,Virginia
    Posts
    1,238
    i use niagra spray starch...cheap at grocery store
    Find a point in horizon.... keep moving towards it....

  20. #45
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    393
    Quote Originally Posted by topper1 View Post
    i use niagra spray starch...cheap at grocery store
    I find that aerosols also spray on the floor around the ironing board. Not good.

  21. #46
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lumby, British Columbia
    Posts
    2,716
    Quote Originally Posted by DOTTYMO View Post
    I read this before. So I starched my backing for a quilt and put it in the freezer. I found it about 2 weeks later and wondered what this frozen thing was. How long should it stay in the fridge?
    Oh man this is so funny. Thanks for the laugh. This sounds like something I would do.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.