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Thread: Stitch in the ditch with a queen sized quilt?

  1. #1
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    How does someone do stitch in the ditch on their Queen sized log cabin using their home sewing machine? I just can't figure it out unless they are using a freeform foot. Tell me how you do it!?

    My previous log cabin was tied. I have a courthouse steps top that will be quilted in 3 pieces using a walking or ditch foot and then assembled. I can't do a straight stitch using the freeform foot with any resemblance of straight. Tips?

  2. #2
    Super Member cherylynne's Avatar
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    You have to roll it and pin it so it will fit under the arm on your machine. It is a real exercise for your arms and back, but SID can be done on a large quilt. Rest some of the quilt on an extra table that you put next to your machine. Good luck and show us pictures when you finish.

  3. #3
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I quilted several log cabins on my DSM before getting a longarm. I quilted them in sections, so I didn't have so much bulk going under the machine's arm. I stabilized the top by SITD in all the seams where the blocks joined, then started doing all those log cabin seams. I would start at one end, make some close together stitches or back stitch when that seam ended, then move down to where the next seam started up, again make some close together stitches or backstitch and continue. I used the walking foot. Practice helps you get into the seam, but if you're not quite in it don't worry - no one will notice anyway, and when the quilt is washed the seams will be even less noticeable. Another option is to do a wavy line across the seam line, or quilt "next to" the seam, but I prefer SITD.

  4. #4
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    One word: Walking Foot. OK, two words.
    The walking foot will help keep the quilt feeding smoothly. You need to prepare the quilt sandwich as you would for machine quilting. I usually start from the center. My walking foot has interchangeable bottom plates, one has a guide for SITD.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for sharing. Love to get good tips.

  6. #6
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I did my jumbo queen Dresden plate on a Brother 1500S with a walking foot. Slow and steady. Bunch it or roll it.

  7. #7
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunster
    Another option is to do a wavy line across the seam line, .
    The Bernina #4 stitch.
    Hides a multitude of sins. :mrgreen:
    And looks kinda cool.

  8. #8
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    I roll it rather tightly along the long edge to about the middle and hold the roll over my shoulder. It can get quite tiring. Key is not to let the roll fall off the table once or it will pull and distort the row of stitches. I unroll just enough to get to the next seam. When that half is done, I rotate the quilt and repeat on the other half. It really does work on a regular DSM. (I've done it)

  9. #9
    Senior Member CarrieC's Avatar
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    Bunch and roll. Be prepared to take breaks to ease your shoulders and upper arms. It is doable, it is not necessarily my favorite thing to do - but it is doable. Take your time and make sure SURE you have the layers well basted/pinned or whatever. As you bunch and roll and push etc the secure basting is VERY important.

  10. #10
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    walking foot

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