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Thread: teaching quilting or to soon?

  1. #1
    Super Member babyfireo4's Avatar
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    Our Joann's in Logansport has classes for knitting and crochet but, not quilting. I was chatting with a sales lady and asked why they didn't have any quilting classes there and she said it was because no one wanted to teach it! Really! It seems amazing that no one is willing to teach a quilting class! I'm really tempted to offer but have only been quilting since July 2010. Depending on what is required (ie would I have to supply everything or would ppl bring their own? How does price work? What is in demand the most to learn?) I may not have been quilting long but am a really fast learner and get a little obsessed with perfection, in my own work not others :) Soo what do you think? Please, be honest as I am very curious what everyone thinks on this! Hmm..... I wonder if anyone would have a problem with a 24 yr old as a teacher.....

  2. #2
    Super Member lovequilts's Avatar
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    Some people just want the basics to start. You can do a lecture type class with demos. I've been to a lot of letcure/demos classes and have enjoyed them a lot. If they have the space, you can do an actual class. Students would bring all their own supplies. you could have a class on the D9P for example. Simple but productive. Most students want to see "something" at the end of their time. MHO only

  3. #3
    Super Member Lv2sew2011's Avatar
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    Most quilting classes that I have looked into want 25.00 - 30.00 per class...

  4. #4
    Super Member merry's Avatar
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    You could offer a beginners class with an easy pattern that you have experience with. Speaking for myself & my friends who have daughters your age, we are very comfortable with young women teaching us old dogs new tricks :)

  5. #5
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    Go for it! Do the basics and do them well, with a product at the end.

  6. #6
    Super Member babyfireo4's Avatar
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    I'll post some of what I've done to give you an idea of what I really know so far. I've posted the bottom two before, but the top one is the newest. These are the pics of the top off my phone. top and bottom are completely finished now, but still hand quilting on the middle one :)
    Attached Images Attached Images      

  7. #7
    Super Member Jill's Avatar
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    My first quilting class was for beginners and was taught at JoAnn's using the Eleanor Burns pattern "Winning Hands." The class was $35 (nine years ago) and we each had to purchase the fabric, rotary cutter, ruler, thread, pins, and any other items we needed/wanted.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Maggie_1963's Avatar
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    This thread interested me as I checked into this just a few days ago at our JA. You have to fill out an application, and depending on the cost of the class which is set by JA, you get a percent of that...you may have to take a class to get "certified" in what JA wants you to teach as they have specific things like bags, quilts, etc, not sure if you select the project or they do, you may want to call them for more info, I was looking into teaching scrapbooking for them and I had to be "certified" in the particular way that they wanted the instructing to be done and with certain equipment. If you watch the JA flyers, they usually have a particular project up for that promo, and you have to have it finished and know how to make it before teaching. I think it would have been fun, but after I figured my time making samples, traveling, teaching, etc. I would rather teach individuals at a local church, social group, etc. for nothing and get to choose what I teach, and share my love of quilting. I encourage you to ck with your store to get all the facts first, then make a decision. I sure like to shop there! Hope this helps! Good luck!

  9. #9
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
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    Ask again at your Joanns to see what is required. Then take it from there. Could be a fun experience

  10. #10
    Super Member Murphy's Avatar
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    Start with something like a simple rail fence. That was my first class and I loved it because I could be successful quickly and really accomplish a lovely finished product. We were required to purchase the book and, of course, our own fabric and paid a fee (for instructor) for the class. Worth every dime. Definitely got me started and I never looked back. Go for it; age of instructor has nothing to do with it. Kindness to beginners does (smile).

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