Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 17 of 17

Thread: For Those Experienced Quilters.......

  1. #11
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,501
    Blog Entries
    1
    Spray basting helps. Starching also helps a *lot*.

    I heavily starch the backing fabric before sandwiching. My method for yardage is to mix a 1:1 solution of Sta-Flo liquid laundry starch and water, "paint" it on using a large wall painting brush until the fabric is saturated, toss in dryer, then iron with steam.

    I also starch the top, but for that I use spray starch.

    Starching stabilizes the fabric so it doesn't distort while you are working with it. Spray basting helps keep all the layers together so one fabric doesn't stretch more than the other.

    When sandwiching, it's important not to stretch the backing. You want it lying perfectly flat, but not stretched tight like a drum. If you clamp or tape a stretched backing down, once you unclamp or untape the fabric will spring back to its normal tension, creating excess in the top and batting.

  2. #12
    Super Member Ilovemydogs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    White Mountains, AZ
    Posts
    2,720
    Blog Entries
    8
    I have started putting the quilt top down first then batting then the backing. i pin and flip over and pin the heck out of it. Less wrinkles for me that way!

  3. #13
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Here not there
    Posts
    1,448
    Blog Entries
    2
    Smooth, smooth, smooth, pin, pin, pin is the only way I get good results. Be careful not to stretch anything.

  4. #14
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Monroe, IN
    Posts
    1,957
    Once I discovered spray basting, I do not have any issues with tucks on backside or anywhere else. The fabrics do not shift or stretch as they are held in place far better than you could ever think about by pinning.

  5. #15
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3,583
    Maybe that is what I am doing subconsciently - stretching. The quilting is a hit or miss until I found out for SURE what mistakes I have been doing. Pressing vs ironing is another one that stretches the fabric....maybe I should be completely awake when I sew? haha Thanks for your suggestions.

  6. #16
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Michigan. . .FINALLY!!!!
    Posts
    6,807
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S
    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn
    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S
    I used to hate quilting my tops as the dreaded tucks were inevitable . Once I discovered spray basting they were a thing of the past. I do use my walking foot , that in combination with spray basting cured my really bad case of tucks .
    You use your walking foot to quilt with?
    Yes , when quilting straight lines a walking foot is the best choice. If you are doing curves , then a Free Motion foot ( or darning foot) is the best choice.
    I just took a FMQ class and we were taught to use the FM foot for ALL quilting. . .

  7. #17
    Super Member Glassquilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Northeast IL
    Posts
    2,064
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn
    I just took a FMQ class and we were taught to use the FM foot for ALL quilting. . .
    I think they each have their place. I like the walking foot for cross hatch. It's got that little bar attachment guide.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.