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Thread: thread

  1. #1
    Super Member
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    My new Baby Lock and I have a love/hate relationship. :?
    It's SO sensitive to EVERYTHING!!

    For the past several sewing days, the top thread has been breaking. I've read the troubleshooting guide and have done everything in there--and the thread breaks again. It just might take longer to do so. :wink:

    I had to switch colors to sew the CW binding--and switch back when I was done, so I decided to switch from Mettlers (which the machine seller said was a great thread!) to Gutermann (which I was told has lost its high quality) and no more breaking!!! :D

    I can't figure this machine out--I must learn what makes it happy and stick to that--I'm tired of having too much of the wrong thread. My old Singer ate anything!!

    I was told to not use cotton, just polyester...

    I did notice the dark brown Mettler left little dark brown lint piece all over--yuck.

    Tell me what thread you have the best luck with. What does your machine like?

  2. #2
    Senior Member CindyBee's Avatar
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    I have a Babylock too. I use both Mettler and Gutterman without a problem. When I buy the Mettler, I use the "silk finish". The dealer did say that it cuts down on fraying. I'm also using a Schmetz Universal 80/12 needle. Hope this helps!

  3. #3
    Cookn's Avatar
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    How often do you replace your needle and what size do you use ? When I'm piecing a lot I replace my needle daily and when the thread starts breaking I go up in size, usually end up with a 90/14. Also the type of needle does make a difference, a universal has a slightly rounded point and if the material is stiffer, I use an embroidery needle which has a sharp point.

  4. #4
    Jerrie's Avatar
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    I use the essential thread from connecting thread i love it give it a try i have two machine and it workd wonderful on both my first spool when i tried it broke all the time i think it was a bad spool but when i used it a while it stopped and never had another problem i been useing it for about 8 months

    Jerrie

  5. #5
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    If I am making a quilt top, I just use the quilting thread that Wal-Mart sells (I'm a cheap date). If I am sewing clothing, I use just the dual-duty. I believe the brand is Coats. I am afraid to say this for fear that it will turn my luck, but I have not had any trouble. I have a Elna, White, Brother, Paff, and have had a Singer and a Sears. Years and years ago there was some kind of spun poly thread that was horrible. I do keep scraps near my machine and sew samples to get the right needle, right tension, etc. Once I was using a metalic thread, ran out, changed to the next spool and could not keep it from breaking. I metioned this at my quilting store and the owner told me that the manufactorers have told her that this sometimes happens because of a problem with the thread itself. Also, on a recent quilting show --- I think Sewing with Martha -- a man who is vice-president, president (???) of Baby Lock demoed some fancy sewing which required satin stiches ---- he was using something from a bottle to drop on the spool of thread. He said this caused the thread to feed through all the twists and turns smoothly. Haven't we come a long way from just a spool of thread????????

  6. #6
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    Wow--thanks everyone. I wonder about the needle. When using the Singer--I changed my needle only when it broke from hitting a pin. Now I change it more often, but for the life of me it seems like a waste. Isn't it still sharp?? :roll: I need to learn more about needles...maybe I'll pick some 90/14s up and see what happens... I think I usually have 80/12 in there. I figured since I always sew with cottons it wouldn't make a difference.

    I'm not changing anything right now though---it's working!! :wink:

    Keep teaching me!! :D

  7. #7
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    Karla..I had no idea until I took a class how important your needle choice actually is to how your machine behaves. I have lots of different kinds of needles now for different activities and I DO change them frequently. If my machine in misbehaving...it is usually the needle...not the thread. You should change out your needle after about 8 hours of quilting. Sometimes when you think it is sharp, you can run it through your fingers and you will notice a tiny spur somewhere on it..that will cause the needle not to pick up the thread properly and cause you tons of frustration.

    I order my needles from jhittle...they are pretty inexpensive compared to the headaches not having the right one causes me. :wink:

  8. #8
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    sandpat--thank you. Can you give me a quick lesson on what needles you use for what? Do I ever need more than an 80 or 90 if I'm only using cotton fabric? I know when I finally make that ragged denim, I need another needle... but now??

    This time--I only changed thread and not the needle--so it was the thread. I think?

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    There was one thing I did not mention -- the bobbin area needs to be cleaned OFTEN!!! I'm sure you know to not use "canned air". I have learned to keep a soft brush nearby the sewing machines. If I have put a tiny tiny drop of machine oil on the brush it really gets after the lint and it is not necessary to put the oil on often, it sort of absorbs into the bursh. The sewing maching repair man and store owner is really really REALLY NASTY if a person brings in her machine with a build up of lint. He does not have any people skills, but he is smart enough to hire people who do. I try to be smart also --- no matter what is wrong with my machine, I am DOUBLE sure to clean it well before I take it to him!!!

  10. #10
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    I vacuum my bobbin area with one of those hand held vacuums it works pretty good. The nozzel isn't big enough to do a really good job but it does get into places you cant reach with a brush.
    I wasted money on an attachment for my vacuum cleaner made just for sewing machines and it was a big hassle and did not work that well. Cost 10 dollars at Joanns sewing center. Dont buy one.

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