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Thread: Walking foot

  1. #31
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    Well I will have to try this,never even thought of using my walking foot for anything except straight stitches. lol

  2. #32
    Senior Member Moon Holiday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darlene
    My walking foot only uses the straight stitch
    If you have an open toe walking foot you can zigzag and do other decorative stitches, and the foot will still keeps layers together.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Chay's Avatar
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    I can use my walking foot for decorative stitches too. I often use it for an elongated zig-zag that ends up looking like a wave.

  4. #34
    Senior Member Janet My's Avatar
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    I use my walking foot all the time with all my decorative stitches... the ones that go forward and backward. The foot on my Bernina 1230 works great. I just can't zoom along at 100 mph, but it gets the job done without a hitch.

  5. #35
    Super Member JUNEC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Izaquilter
    I would think that it would depend on how large the opening is in your walking foot whether it would allow your needle to go back n forth, & the throat plate. I have a single hole plate that I put on & forget from time to time that it is on & I break a needle every time!
    Tell me about it - I have broken more needles....

  6. #36
    Super Member MaggieLou's Avatar
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    I have a Brother and I have used zig zag and decorative stitches with my walking foot. You can't do any that have reverse stitches though. Be sure you have the plate for zig zag and not straight stitch on the bottom or you will break a needle.

  7. #37
    Super Member jeanneb52's Avatar
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    Of course you can!!!! I use it with lots of fancy stitches. Just make sure the needle doesn't it the sides when it swings from side to side.

  8. #38
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    I have a pfaff and I use my walking foot when I use my fancy stitched on my quilt. Have never broken a needle but this will be something I ask my dealer about when I have my machine cleaned this spring.

  9. #39
    Senior Member kellen46's Avatar
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    I use my walking foot constatly, for everything, not just for quilting. It is great for sewing on borders. I use the decorative stitch and the zig zag all the time, no problem. What do you have to loose by trying??? a broken needle, well it was probably time to change it anyway....go for it, no fear sewing is good sewing....

  10. #40
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    I sometimes do the Betty Cotton Theory quilting and I always use my walking foot for the decorative stitches. As long as your foot has a wide enough opening for the stitch you select to zig and zag with you can use it. This method needs a walking foot because you are quilting four thicknesses together with a decorative stitch and a regular foot wouldn't keep the fabric feeding at the same pace. I hope this makes sense to you.

    Good Luck

    Suzy

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