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Thread: Woven fusible vs. unwoven fusible

  1. #1
    Member Frolfsen's Avatar
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    Can someone please tell me what the difference is between the two fusibles and when I would want to use one and not the other?

    Thanks so much.

    Fran

  2. #2
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    Not sure, but I think woven fusibles are heavier and more often used in tailoring and dressmaking. Non-woven fusibles are the kind most often used by quilters -- Wonder Under, Steam-a-Seam, etc.

    There is one other type I know of, fusible tricot. This is a knit fusible -- one of the best choices for making a t-shirt quilt because the t-shirt fabric remains pliable and the fusible doesn't make it too stiff or heavy. T-shirt fabric is knit, so using a knit fusible with it makes sense.

  3. #3
    Member Frolfsen's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info! I'm going to be making a quilt out of kimono silk remnants (probably a crazy quilt) and I think the tricot that you were talking about is what I should use to back the silk with to make it easier to work with. It's a much lighter-weight fusible.

  4. #4
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    woven has a grainline, nonwoven does not

  5. #5
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frolfsen
    Thanks for the info! I'm going to be making a quilt out of kimono silk remnants (probably a crazy quilt) and I think the tricot that you were talking about is what I should use to back the silk with to make it easier to work with. It's a much lighter-weight fusible.
    Yes, I think so. Check on the kind of needle you should use with silk to make sure it doesn't snag the silk, and practice sewing on a few fused scraps to make sure everything is going to work for you before commiting your good kimono remnants to the process!

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