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Thread: I am looking for some old recipes

  1. #71
    Senior Member lynndianne's Avatar
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    Am I the only one who things Spam is just toooooo salty? My husband bought a can (as a joke) and we tried it...but I ate one small slice and the rest went in the trash.

    Lynn
    The early bird gets the worm
    But the second mouse gets the cheese

  2. #72
    Senior Member lynndianne's Avatar
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    sorry for the misspelling of thinks. I tried to correct it before the message went through...

    Lynn
    The early bird gets the worm
    But the second mouse gets the cheese

  3. #73
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    Reading through this reminds me of being a kid at family gatherings and asking about the keepsakes in a box that would find their way out to where I was with the oldest relatives. I learned that our families were lucky enough to be able to barter for gas or rides to get to grandparents' farm at least once a month if not once a week. Milk, eggs, fresh fruit and vegies. In other words, they had survived crossing the ocean and starting over in 1850s on one branch; had dug deep and pioneered on three others. They raised families and helped neighbors during the Great Depression of the thirties so a little hardship in getting manufactured goods could be lived with. Royal Baking Powder had a recipe book that dealt with the basics of biscuits and cakes etc from the twenties. The Household Search Light Cookbooks were like the America's Test Kitchen of today. Basics were taught at grandma's or mom's elbow --- the joy of cooking a full meal with Grandma sitting in place and letting me run the cookstove (wood fired) to do Sunday dinner in the early sixties was great. I even learned how to make a smooth, thin gravy for the roast beef. During the second world war Grandma didn't do as much cookie baking as she did when I arrived in the fifties. Perhaps they should've continued rationing sugar and flour??
    WilliP

  4. #74
    Member VaughnVinn's Avatar
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    Well said! Can't express in words how we used to enjoy cooking with Grandama. Her little tips and the way she used to add herbs to and all ingredients to recipe was all perfect.
    Experts agree that cheap cabinets can save up to 50% of your kitchen budget

  5. #75
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    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by Psychomomquilter View Post
    I am looking for some of our grand mas recipes, maybe ggreatgrandmas, 1940's era
    something they cooked for a meal. I have been doing some research on this era. It is sooo amazing what they had to use, get by on and so on, and we complain if we don't have things in our cupboards!

    what to fix for supper? SPAM, any recipes for it? old fashioned home made biscuits? chicken pot pie? rationing this stuff, even children had rationing booklets. coffee and tea? sugar?

    oopps sorry going on a tangent there.
    But was and am curious how foods were prepared with the little they had. any thoughts on this? oh, any recipes on this?


    Ice Box Molasses Cookies My Grandma made these often: 1 cup EACH shortening, molasses, brown sugar, 1 egg, 4 cups flour, 1 teas. EACH salt, soda, ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves. Boil together shortening, molasses and brown sugar over low heat til boiling. Remove and let cool to luke-warm, add egg and mix well, sift together flour and spices, add and mix well. Pack tightly into greased pan and cover tightly. (I roll into a long coil in wax-paper) Chill in ice box several hours or overnight, Slice thin on greased baking sheet. Bake at 350( or when she said the wood stove was hot enough) for 15 minutes. Makes about 10 dozen. Delicious!

  6. #76
    Super Member Mariah's Avatar
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    Mom's Meat Loaf;
    1# hamburger
    1/2#sausage
    2 eggs
    1 c. milk
    2 c. bread crumbs
    salt and pepper
    1/2 t. sage
    1/4 t. garlic powder
    1/4 t. onion powder
    Toast the bread for crumbs; toast twice to have nice and crumbly; add to milk. Beat eggs and add to milk mixture.
    Combine meat and have well blended; add seasonings and mix well. Add milk-egg mixture; mix well. Put in baking pan.
    Topping: Combine 1 c. ketchup with brown sugar and mix well. Poke holes in meat mixture, and pour topping over and spread well.
    Put in baking dishes; this makes a large meat loaf. For just 2 people, I use 2-3 pans, and freeze part of it. It is wonderful to have on hand when you don't care if you cook or not, or company comes. Makes great meat loaf sandwiches; my DH and Son's favorite sandwich!
    My Mom made this quite a lot, as it was quick, easy and made a lot.
    Mariah.
    Have a wonderful Quilting Day, make it your way!
    Marta
    Martha Tompkins

  7. #77
    Super Member luvstoquilt's Avatar
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    My grandmother made that on Friday nights...she made two bowls..one with bacon and one without for the Catholic family members. Only difference was she cooked the mac almost done and she added a bell pepper. I love that and love to smell it cooking...
    "You must do the thing you think you cannot do"....E. Roosevelt

    Sharon
    Yorkville, IL

  8. #78
    Super Member Tink's Mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SewExtremeSeams View Post
    Is that kind of like a quick noodle? So, you could put a sauce over it?
    Spaetzle is like a small dumpling. Really wonderful to eat. I would kill for a real Spaetzle cutter...
    Shoot, now I have a taste for them...
    Tink's Mom (My name is really Susie)

  9. #79
    Super Member Tink's Mom's Avatar
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    My Mom used to have to stand in line at the stores during WWII for my Grandmother...she would stand in line sometimes for 1 roll of toilet paper.

    She still talks about my Grandma making spagetti with bacon as the meat....HORRIBLE! It was the only meat she could get a bit of and it needed to stretch to feed 5...including my grandfather and Gt Grandfather.
    Tink's Mom (My name is really Susie)

  10. #80
    Junior Member mtnmama's Avatar
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    Here is a spread recipe I made up using a can of spam, 8 oz block of softened cream cheese and prepared horseradish. Put the spam and cream cheese in a food processor until mixed, then add horseradish to taste. I usually add about 2-3 tablespoons. Great to spread on crackers and hard bread.
    Mtn Mama

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