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Thread: Cleaning and Reviving furniture(Sewing cabinets)

  1. #11
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cindy Lou Who
    Glenn,
    What would you use to clean what looks to be a faux leather-like rectangle on the sideboard of the cabinet? I haven't taken pictures yet, but will try if you have no idea what I am trying to describe (and not doing a very good job either!)
    Off to bed now - 4:30 am comes early so I'll check in tomorrow night.
    Thanks,
    Cindy Lou Who
    would that faux leather be just a build up of old varnish, etc.? Old finishes can look like that if the piece isn't cleaned between applications of varnish or shellac?

  2. #12
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    very happy you said REsTOREd....people think they need to strip it down and refinish it...so sad...the natural patina is always so much nicer to look at!

  3. #13
    Member PatQuilts's Avatar
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    Thank you!!! You must have been reading my mind. Seeing all the restored machines has inspired me to "revive" the finish on my grandmother's treadle machine. It still work beautifully.

    I had no idea where to look for this information and I knew I didn't want to "strip" off the original finish.

  4. #14
    Super Member lawsonmugs's Avatar
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    Will this work on an old oak treadle cabinet that is from 1882? The finish is blistered and comes off as you rub your fingers on it. so I have taken the finish off and lightly sanded it.It's so pretty now. do I just wax it now or do I put some kind of shelack on it?Thanks in advance for any help Mary

  5. #15
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roseOfsharon
    Oh wow, thanks Glenn. I have black windsor chairs with fruit prints on the back of chair top. Could they be cleaned with the same method. They seem to be soiled ... like a sticky grime. I have tried cleaning it off but it still seems stickyish.
    Yes, they can be cleaned with this method. Just don't rub to hard over the painted fruit. This should solve the sticky problems. Just apply a coat of wax as per instructions to protect the chairs. Have fun cleaning. Glenn

  6. #16
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cindy Lou Who
    Glenn,
    What would you use to clean what looks to be a faux leather-like rectangle on the sideboard of the cabinet? I haven't taken pictures yet, but will try if you have no idea what I am trying to describe (and not doing a very good job either!)
    Off to bed now - 4:30 am comes early so I'll check in tomorrow night.
    Thanks,
    Cindy Lou Who
    If it is not leather, try a foam cleaner(fabric spot cleaner) or you can take dish soap and a little water and sponge. Dip the sponge in the soap mixture and massage several times until the sponge is very foaming but not dripping wet and rub lightly. The only problem with the old faux leather is they are sometimes not color fast so if you see a lot of color on the sponge stop. So test a small spot first. If it bleeds on the sponge, take corn starch and sprinkle thickly covering the whole thing and let set for several days then vacuum off. I really could use a good picture. If it turns out to be real leather I have a potion for that two. Glenn

  7. #17
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GailG
    Quote Originally Posted by Cindy Lou Who
    Glenn,
    What would you use to clean what looks to be a faux leather-like rectangle on the sideboard of the cabinet? I haven't taken pictures yet, but will try if you have no idea what I am trying to describe (and not doing a very good job either!)
    Off to bed now - 4:30 am comes early so I'll check in tomorrow night.
    Thanks,
    Cindy Lou Who
    would that faux leather be just a build up of old varnish, etc.? Old finishes can look like that if the piece isn't cleaned between applications of varnish or shellac?
    I could be what we call aligatored finish. The shellac could be grazed and crinkly from extreme heat. If this is the case after cleaning the piece, take a rag with denatured alcohol and rub the spot and if the finish soften continue until the area is smooth again. Now you must to the whole side by rubbing with alcohol to blend the area together. If this meets your approval apply a very thin coat of shellac to the area then rub down the side with oooosteel wool and paste wax to take the new look off.

  8. #18
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn
    Quote Originally Posted by GailG
    Quote Originally Posted by Cindy Lou Who
    Glenn,
    What would you use to clean what looks to be a faux leather-like rectangle on the sideboard of the cabinet? I haven't taken pictures yet, but will try if you have no idea what I am trying to describe (and not doing a very good job either!)
    Off to bed now - 4:30 am comes early so I'll check in tomorrow night.
    Thanks,
    Cindy Lou Who
    would that faux leather be just a build up of old varnish, etc.? Old finishes can look like that if the piece isn't cleaned between applications of varnish or shellac?
    I could be what we call aligatored finish. The shellac could be grazed and crinkly from extreme heat. If this is the case after cleaning the piece, take a rag with denatured alcohol and rub the spot and if the finish soften continue until the area is smooth again. Now you must to the whole side by rubbing with alcohol to blend the area together. If this meets your approval apply a very thin coat of shellac to the area then rub down the side with oooosteel wool and paste wax to take the new look off.
    The shellac should be applied to the entire side to blend.

  9. #19
    Super Member greaterexp's Avatar
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    Bless you, Glenn! This was just what I was looking for!

  10. #20
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    Thanks I have just found a potentially beautiful old wood dining table and I have lots of other old things that need spruced up I wanted to find a natural way so as not to harm the original finishes These are on my to-do list if we ever get spring to drop in for more than a day so I can do it outside

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