Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 ... LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 124

Thread: Cleaning and Reviving furniture(Sewing cabinets)

  1. #51
    Super Member Cogito's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    1,328
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by cabbagepatchkid View Post
    When you say "3-4 drops" of household ammonia how much of the other ingredients are you making up? Thanks!
    I didn't see the answer to this....I understand the ratio of 4 parts versus 1 part, but what is that total volume that you are adding a couple of drops to?
    The expert's mind has no room to learn while the beginner's mind is free to know everything....

  2. #52
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Central Minnesota
    Posts
    402
    I always use a one/fourth cup measure as my 1 part
    1 cup of w vinegar 1 cup of boiled linseed, 1 cup mineral spirits, 1/4 cup denatured alcohol and 3-4 drops of household ammonia.

  3. #53
    Member jpete523's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    93
    Blog Entries
    2
    Glenn, I hope you can help. I'm refurbishing a mid-century Singer cabinet, you know, the good old particle board and laminate style. It had the requisite paint splatters, water rings, red nail polish, and something black and gummy. I've been able to clean it up satisfactorily using Howard's but there are lots of spots where the finish is completely gone. Some of it lifted while cleaning but there are spots where it was already gone. I'd like to remove all of the lacquer, my guess, and refinish it. My instincts tell me to use denatured alcohol but I'm not sure. I definitely don't want to sand it. What do you suggest I use to remove it? Then once removed should I use lacquer and, if so, do you recommend spray or brush on?

    You've always been so generous with your advice and I want to add my expression of gratitude. So ... Thank you!

    Jan

  4. #54
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,522
    Blog Entries
    1
    If the laminate is wood you can use alochol but if the finish is lacquer then you will need a stripper stuff with acetone in it. If the alochol works use it. Then when dry for several days you can apply a shellac finish( easier to repair if damaged in the future. Lacquer is hard to apply with a brush. You will need to spray if usiing lacquer. An oil based varnish can be brushed on with a good brush with no problems. I do not recommend water based poly to plastic looking for me. I do not think sanding is a very good idea. No problems with the questions I will answer them where ever they are posted. Glad I can help. Thank you so much my pleasure.
    Skip
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  5. #55
    Member jpete523's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    93
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thank you, Glenn. I pretty sure it is wood veneer. I can see distinct grainlines and there's at least one seam on the top side of the lid as well as some variations in the color. I'll start with the alcohol tomorrow and see what happens. Thanks again!

    Jan

  6. #56
    Senior Member sdhaevrsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    343
    Glenn, do you need to put shellac on the wood before waxing with Briwax? I think the shellac is off the wood from my various cleanings. (By the way, I will have to order it online because we have none around where I live, either.) also, a question about the Briwax... You said Dark Mahogany or Dark Walnut would be fine, but I see nothing with those colors online, only Dark Brown, I think it was. Will that work? Thank you!
    ​Sheri

  7. #57
    Senior Member sdhaevrsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    343
    P.S. Glenn, is there a particular shellac that is best for a novice to use?
    ​Sheri

  8. #58
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,522
    Blog Entries
    1
    You need to shellac before using the briwax. I would use the shellac you get from Lowes in a gt can. this will be fine for what you are doing. You can order shellac flakes and mix them with alcohol if you like but not needed. Don't worry about the name on the briwax if it says dark brown this will do fine.

    PS you want the clear shellac
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  9. #59
    Senior Member sdhaevrsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    343
    Thank you!
    ​Sheri

  10. #60
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,522
    Blog Entries
    1
    You are most welcome.
    Skip
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  11. #61
    Senior Member sdhaevrsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    343
    Glenn, can you put shellac over the Briwax? I have some Briwax in dark ordered and don't have access to water based stains here. I hate to order some online because of picking colors and shipping costs. I was thinking maybe I could just use the Briwax both before AND after the shellac?
    ​Sheri

  12. #62
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,522
    Blog Entries
    1
    Sorry you can't use shellac over wax it will not stick. You can however go to the local hardware store and buy minwax oil based stain in small cans. Apply according to directions and let cure for 24 hours and then you can shellac. It can be whatever brand they carry in the store. The wax is only used after the finsih coat is applied such as shellac.
    Skip
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  13. #63
    Senior Member sdhaevrsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    343
    Ok. Since you recommended the water based stain I figured I should avoid the oil based ones. Thank you, again.
    ​Sheri

  14. #64
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,522
    Blog Entries
    1
    The new water based stains are not as good as the aniline dye water based stains. That is why I said oil based. Also the new water based stains you get at Lowes or a hardware store have a muddy look to them and the oil base does not.
    Sorry for the confusion.
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  15. #65
    Senior Member sdhaevrsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    343
    I found a good (I think) wood dye from a wood working shop in Boise. It is made by General Finishes. I am working and practicing on the FW card table I got. Love the stain, hate the shellac which several of you say is so easy to use! Obviously, I am doing something wrong! I have gotten blotches, streaks, thick areas next to thin areas, and shine next to dull.

    Help? Could you post a video of exactly how you do this sometime? You all say it is easy, but I sure can't get it right. I have tried several times, sanding it off and starting over... Then sometimes I have diluted the shellac down with denatured alcohol and tried to "melt and blend." It is not working for me. I need to see someone doing it, I guess. I have tried to find a video tutorial online, but have not found one that shows how to do this.

    French polishing seems to be put on extremely thinly, which I didn't do the first times I tried getting the shellac on... But I tried to follow your instructions on QB instead of googling it first.

    I wish you lived next door so that I could come over and watch you shellac!!
    ​Sheri

  16. #66
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,522
    Blog Entries
    1
    You are not doing anything wrong. You just are not applying enough coats. the first coat will be dull and not uniform. The seconed coat will get better and the third will be great. Shellac has to be build up in layers. If you thin the shellac to much it will soak into the wood and will require more coats to build up the finish. After the last coat as cured for a week or so buff with wax and fine steel wool then buff to a shine. I use briwax.
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  17. #67
    Senior Member sdhaevrsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    343
    Oh. Pkay, then, I will keep adding more coats of shellac. Do you add any dematured alcohol to it, or use it straight? And didn't recmmend using a lint free cloth to apply? Using it straight on the piece dries so fast that the cloth sticks to the wood before I can swipe twice in a row, the same spot! And I get ridges at the edge.
    ​Sheri

  18. #68
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,522
    Blog Entries
    1
    In my instruction I think I said to add a drop or two of linseed oil to the shellac on the rag to keep the rag from sticking. I did say to use a lint free rag in the french polishing. You can add about a 1/4 cup alcohol to the shellac to thin it down some. You go in a circular motion when french polishing and then swipe with the grain at the last. If you use a rag to apply shellac always use a drop or two of linseed oil. In your case just brush on three or four coats of shellac. You can sand lightly between coats to remove any brush marks. Wait a day between coats to allow curing time.
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  19. #69
    Senior Member redbugsullivan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Western Washington State
    Posts
    553
    Blog Entries
    6
    The linseed oil makes a difference! I use your mixture as a basic then tweak it according to need and weather. Right now, our humidity makes everything gooey.

    On another note, I have rescued a container (never used) that I plan on storing solution #1 in. At times, a brush would be helpful for applying this to larger areas, keeping the solution clean. I don't plan on brushing it on heavily, just brush to apply and then use the rag for that specific small area. These containers have a built in brush!! Someone's trash is my treasure.
    Annette

    There is no fireside like your own fireside.

  20. #70
    Senior Member sdhaevrsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    343
    Okay, Glenn, I missed the linseed oil part. I'll do that. And, add 1/4 denatured alcohol to how much shellac?

    Thank you.
    ​Sheri

  21. #71
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,522
    Blog Entries
    1
    1/4 cup alcohol to one gt shellac.
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  22. #72
    Senior Member sdhaevrsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    343
    Got it.
    ​Sheri

  23. #73
    Senior Member redbugsullivan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Western Washington State
    Posts
    553
    Blog Entries
    6
    I am about to apply veneer to the top components of a Victorian White cabinet. Pieces separated (even the top frame), veneer removed, sanded, cleaned and ready for the next step. Insert screeching halt here.

    I've researched so many ways to apply veneer that I need help! I've decided to use wood glue and have a tentative solution for all over pressure, a large slab of granite. So many questions!!! Should I start a new thread?
    Annette

    There is no fireside like your own fireside.

  24. #74
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,522
    Blog Entries
    1
    You can keep it here. I usually use contact cement instead of glue no need to clamp and easy to use. Cut the veneer about 1/8" oversize you can sand down later to meet the edge when the cement cures. If you don not have a perfectly flat surface with weight you will get ripples in the veneer because of the uneven pressure when you use wood glue. If you use glue make sure the granite covers the entire area to be glued and the still place heavy objects evenly over the granite (hope the granite is very flat) such as bricks or a five gallon bucket full of water for the extra weight. Lay wax paper between the granite and the veneer so if glue seeps up it will not stick to the granite.
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  25. #75
    Senior Member redbugsullivan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Western Washington State
    Posts
    553
    Blog Entries
    6
    Thank you! I did use wood glue because I wanted workable contact time. The granite is 3/4" thick and very flat. I checked. I used a brayer and rolled out any potential air bubbles before placing a very thin layer of closed cell foam between the granite and veneer. Tomorrow will tell if it worked.
    Annette

    There is no fireside like your own fireside.

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.