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Thread: WEDDING RING CHAT CLASS

  1. #1
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    Start with the pattern file attached.
    add about a fat quarter of background fabric and some scraps about 2" x 2.5"

    you'll also need a marking pen and if they're handy, a glue stick and a couple of manila folders or thin cardboard

    PLEASE NOTE:

    Today we covered the paper piecing method for making the rings, and making templates for the melons. We worked all the way through to the completion of the first melon. all four melons are made the same way. simply lather, rinse, repeat. :wink:

    The class will continue on Sunday, 3 Feb, starting at 2pm eastern USA time. we will start by adapting the pattern to make a solid center, then attach the four melons. we will also go over the options for continuing the wedding rings to make either one block (using the corner pieces); to make a table runner (using a second adaptation of the corner pattern pieces); or to make any size quilt top you choose.



    Here are the photos and commentary from both classes, in one document.

    WHEN PREPARING TO PRINT FROM ACROBAT READER, MAKE SURE TO SET PAGE SCALING TO "NONE". ALSO CLICK ON "ADVANCED" AND SELECT "PRINT AS GRAPHIC".

  2. #2
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    once the pattern is printed, cut out the paper piecing templates for the rings
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  3. #3
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    to figure out how big a scrap you need for the first piece on each ring, fold the pattern back and lay it on a scrap. when you find one big enough to leave fabric "hanging off" all four sizes, with about 1/4" for the seam allowance between the first and second piece, you'll know the minimum size for all your first pieces.
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  4. #4
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    with the printed pattern facing you, lay down the first piece - back of fabric facing you - and the second piece right side facing up. allow about a 1/4" seam to the right of the stitching line.

    another way too look at it is to picture a sandwich. the bottom layer is the second piece, right side facing up. the middle is the first piece, back of fabric facing up. the top layer is the pattern, with the printed side facing up so you can see the stitching lines.

    you'll use this system for pieces 3 and beyond, too. the next piece being added will be the bottom layer, the piece already attached to the paper will be the middle, and the pattern will always be on top.

    to place your pieces and get about a 1/4" seam allowance, you can fold back the pattern and measure obsessively; or you can "eyeball" it; or you can draw reference lines on the patter. whichever works best for you.
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  5. #5
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    i want you to notice something very important about the placement of the second piece.

    notice that it's placed "longways" up and down, and that i've only left a bit more than 1/4" of it "dangling" below the pattern

    this is very important. you'll want to do the same thing will each of the rest of the pieces as you add them

    notice, also, that the rest of the pieces are longer than the first by about an inch. that's so, as you work your way around the curve, the scrap will cover the pattern completely. there will be excess to trim away later.

    today, we used 2" squares for the first piece, and 2" x 2.5" for all the others. if your finished wedding rings will be larger or smaller than our 13" rings, experiment with extra patterns and scraps until you figure out the best size for your particular size rings.

  6. #6
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    ok. take that sucker to the machine, and stitch :P

    don't be askeered. show it who's boss. :lol:

    repeat the steps so far until the first two pieces have been attached to all 8 pieces of the rings
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  7. #7
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    when pieces 1 and 2 have been sewn to the paper, press them open.

    you can finger press or do it with an iron. whichever works best for you.
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  8. #8
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    now that pieces 1 and 2 are attached to the paper, it's time for #3.

    please notice that i trimmed away some of the excess from 1 & 2 ... but not until AFTER i had pressed them open. trimming away the extra excess is optional. i noticed, though, that it did make it easier for me to line up the next piece each time i added to the ring.

    the photo illustrates how much easier it is to line it all up if you draw the reference lines 1/4" away from the stitching line. eventually, i didn't need those lines, but they sure helped at first.

    once it's lined up, take it to the machine and sew on the stitching line. repeat this for all 8 ring patterns.

    keep going, adding pieces until you've completed the rings

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  9. #9
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    ok. up 'til now, i've focused on the steps you'd take to make sure all your pieces around the ring matched the pattern exactly. it's quite a bit of work and will be slow going until you get used to the steps and can do them without thinking so hard the whole time.

    BUT ... who says they pieces have to match the pattern exactly? who says they have to be anything or any shape at all in particular? the main reason for using the paper piecing pattern is to make sure you have the right size and shape for the big "chunks" of the ring you'll be sewing to the background fabric.

    you could just as easily do this the same way you would a string quilt or a crazy quilt. just add pieces of any size and shape as you go along the ring. lay them down in any way that pleases you or the shape of the scraps.

    once they're all on, and trimmed to the pattern, you'll have something spontaneous and fun to build your rings with. and not nearly as big a headache. :lol:
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  10. #10
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    ok. let's make those melon templates. you actually need to print two melon pattern pieces. here's where that manila folder comes in. tape, glue, or gluestick the pattern pieces to the folder. cut one out along the outer edge. cut the other out along the stitching line.

    draw horizontal and vertical lines on the smaller one to use later as reference points.

    trace around the larger one to make your melons from the background fabric.

    lay the smaller one in the center of the fabric piece, trace around it for the stitching line, and mark the reference points.

    you need four of these
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