Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 82

Thread: Wedding Ring Chat Class

  1. #1
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3

    Wedding Ring Chat Class

    Start with the pattern file attached.
    add about a fat quarter of background fabric and some scraps about 2" x 2.5"

    you'll also need a marking pen and if they're handy, a glue stick and a couple of manila folders or thin cardboard

    PLEASE NOTE:

    Today we covered the paper piecing method for making the rings, and making templates for the melons. We worked all the way through to the completion of the first melon. all four melons are made the same way. simply lather, rinse, repeat. :wink:

    The class will continue on Sunday, 3 Feb, starting at 2pm eastern USA time. we will start by adapting the pattern to make a solid center, then attach the four melons. we will also go over the options for continuing the wedding rings to make either one block (using the corner pieces); to make a table runner (using a second adaptation of the corner pattern pieces); or to make any size quilt top you choose.



    Here are the photos and commentary from both classes, in one document.

    WHEN PREPARING TO PRINT FROM ACROBAT READER, MAKE SURE TO SET PAGE SCALING TO "NONE". ALSO CLICK ON "ADVANCED" AND SELECT "PRINT AS GRAPHIC".

  2. #2
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    once the pattern is printed, cut out the paper piecing templates for the rings
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    to figure out how big a scrap you need for the first piece on each ring, fold the pattern back and lay it on a scrap. when you find one big enough to leave fabric "hanging off" all four sizes, with about 1/4" for the seam allowance between the first and second piece, you'll know the minimum size for all your first pieces.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    with the printed pattern facing you, lay down the first piece - back of fabric facing you - and the second piece right side facing up. allow about a 1/4" seam to the right of the stitching line.

    another way too look at it is to picture a sandwich. the bottom layer is the second piece, right side facing up. the middle is the first piece, back of fabric facing up. the top layer is the pattern, with the printed side facing up so you can see the stitching lines.

    you'll use this system for pieces 3 and beyond, too. the next piece being added will be the bottom layer, the piece already attached to the paper will be the middle, and the pattern will always be on top.

    to place your pieces and get about a 1/4" seam allowance, you can fold back the pattern and measure obsessively; or you can "eyeball" it; or you can draw reference lines on the patter. whichever works best for you.
    Attached Images Attached Images


  5. #5
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    i want you to notice something very important about the placement of the second piece.

    notice that it's placed "longways" up and down, and that i've only left a bit more than 1/4" of it "dangling" below the pattern

    this is very important. you'll want to do the same thing will each of the rest of the pieces as you add them

    notice, also, that the rest of the pieces are longer than the first by about an inch. that's so, as you work your way around the curve, the scrap will cover the pattern completely. there will be excess to trim away later.

    today, we used 2" squares for the first piece, and 2" x 2.5" for all the others. if your finished wedding rings will be larger or smaller than our 13" rings, experiment with extra patterns and scraps until you figure out the best size for your particular size rings.

  6. #6
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    ok. take that sucker to the machine, and stitch :P

    don't be askeered. show it who's boss. :lol:

    repeat the steps so far until the first two pieces have been attached to all 8 pieces of the rings
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    when pieces 1 and 2 have been sewn to the paper, press them open.

    you can finger press or do it with an iron. whichever works best for you.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    now that pieces 1 and 2 are attached to the paper, it's time for #3.

    please notice that i trimmed away some of the excess from 1 & 2 ... but not until AFTER i had pressed them open. trimming away the extra excess is optional. i noticed, though, that it did make it easier for me to line up the next piece each time i added to the ring.

    the photo illustrates how much easier it is to line it all up if you draw the reference lines 1/4" away from the stitching line. eventually, i didn't need those lines, but they sure helped at first.

    once it's lined up, take it to the machine and sew on the stitching line. repeat this for all 8 ring patterns.

    keep going, adding pieces until you've completed the rings

    Attached Images Attached Images


  9. #9
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    ok. up 'til now, i've focused on the steps you'd take to make sure all your pieces around the ring matched the pattern exactly. it's quite a bit of work and will be slow going until you get used to the steps and can do them without thinking so hard the whole time.

    BUT ... who says they pieces have to match the pattern exactly? who says they have to be anything or any shape at all in particular? the main reason for using the paper piecing pattern is to make sure you have the right size and shape for the big "chunks" of the ring you'll be sewing to the background fabric.

    you could just as easily do this the same way you would a string quilt or a crazy quilt. just add pieces of any size and shape as you go along the ring. lay them down in any way that pleases you or the shape of the scraps.

    once they're all on, and trimmed to the pattern, you'll have something spontaneous and fun to build your rings with. and not nearly as big a headache. :lol:
    Attached Images Attached Images



  10. #10
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    ok. let's make those melon templates. you actually need to print two melon pattern pieces. here's where that manila folder comes in. tape, glue, or gluestick the pattern pieces to the folder. cut one out along the outer edge. cut the other out along the stitching line.

    draw horizontal and vertical lines on the smaller one to use later as reference points.

    trace around the larger one to make your melons from the background fabric.

    lay the smaller one in the center of the fabric piece, trace around it for the stitching line, and mark the reference points.

    you need four of these
    Attached Images Attached Images



  11. #11
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    OR you could be really lazy, like me. iron the fabric, face down, to freezer paper and print the pieces onto the back, then cut them out.

    (note: this is what i was going to use for background. changed my mind, obviously)

    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    well! i guess it would help if i gave you the file you can use to print those melons on your fabric. :shock: :roll: :lol:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    when you have finished stitching the arcs (pieces of the ring), trim away all the excess fabric to the cutting lines around the patterns. trim carefully.

    once they're all trimmed, remove the paper and press the seams open.

    pressing them open isn't a rule but i couldn't believe how much easier it was to fit and sew the arcs to the melons when i pressed open instead of to the side. definitely worth the extra few minutes' work.
    Attached Images Attached Images


  14. #14
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    ok. time to add those melons.

    hint #1: when doing curved piecing, it's always easier to attach an "outie" to an "innie" than the other way around. that's true here, in the drunkard's path ... in anything curvey.

    Hint #2: notice those funny little points on the ends of the arcs and melons. they are odd, but very important.

    take one of the short arcs and one melon. line up the funny point on one end of the melon with the corresponding end of the arc. make sure the stitching line on the melon is facing up.

    do the same with the other end.

    then pin the midpoint of the melon to the midpoint of the arc. don't worry about how goofy it looks.
    Attached Images Attached Images



  15. #15
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    now hold one end of the melon between your index and middle finger, and the midpoint between your thumb and pinkie. very gently let the melon and arc stretch "into" each other. put pins in between.

    if you pressed open your arc seams, it will go together with only a little fuss and stress.

    do the same at the other end, except the midpoint is between index and second finger; end is between thumb and pinkie.

    please note, the photo shows the pinned pieces from the back.
    Attached Images Attached Images



  16. #16
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    time for the other side of the melon. remember to line up those funn little points. this time, it's the funny points of the arc that line up to the melon.

    remember: when you sew the big arc onto the melon, don't sew all the way from end to end. leave that very important quarter inch at each end. we'll need it later.

    another kewl thing: because it's all on the bias, you don't need to clip anything before you press. :P

    Attached Images Attached Images



  17. #17
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    here's the pressed melon from the back. note that the background is press flat, while the arcs tuck under. this will not only look better, it'll make quilting it easier.

    Attached Images Attached Images


  18. #18
    Senior Member anita211's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Northfield, MN
    Posts
    340
    Patrice,

    Do you have the commentary written somewhere so that we can download that as well?

    I have made a couple wedding ring quilts, but like this method much more.

    Anita

  19. #19
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    this is the commentary. each set of photos is accompanied by written instructions and explanations. i wanted to keep everything in one place this time. i think you guys shouldn't have to run back and forth between Main, Pictures and Chit-Chat to find everything.

    there was a great deal of conversation during the class, but i think i included the answers to most - if not all - the questions along with the photos here.

    everyone may feel free to pm questions to me. i'll add those questions and answers to the appropriate photos. i'll even add photos if they'll help more.

    all interested parties are welcome to the next installment of the class this sunday even if you haven't caught up and completed all four melons. however, it will be easier to follow the second half if you have.

  20. #20
    HJ
    HJ is offline

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    34
    This is so cool. Is it from a specific pattern, as I am on late.

    Thanks

    Helen

  21. #21

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    1
    Thank you for sharing, This past summer I had the privilege of completing a dream for a very special lady and her family. A Wedding Ring quilt that had been in the making for 70 years. When I received the top, all the melons were gone and onlly the rings were sewn together...I laughed when I pulled it our of the bag...the Holey Quilt. Yes, I unsewed all the rings and sewed in the melons and completed the top. Many helping hands made it possible to complete this project - the quilt brought comfort to all that were involved in making it possible for the family to cuddle under a wedding ring quilt. When I scrolled through the instructions made possible by you....I know just making the instruction possible for everyone was very time time consuming and I admire your efforts in sharing how to make a Wedding Ring quilt. It also brought back the warm feeling I had while complete the project. Thank you.

  22. #22
    community benefactor
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    5
    :lol: with joy! But i've forgotten your name. This is a wonderful A+ lesson. The writing is clear and the photos are so clear and illustrate the point perfectly. As I looked through it I had questions, but before my brow even began to wrinkle you answered them in the next paragraph or photo. This is the best nugget i've found on-line about quilting. I've been wanting to do this quilt but haven't tried as I thought it would be a long and tedious process and that I wouldn't get the curves right and nothing would fit together. Now I'm going to make a WR quilt for sure and soon. I have many little grand nieces and nephews (no grand children yet) all of whom have been promised a quilt, at least in my mind. Foundation piecing is great. I'm making Storm at Sea now with foundation piecing and it is going together like a dream. Thanks a lot. I'll try to tune in on the 4th. Anne

  23. #23

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    7
    This is wonderful. The pictures are exactly what I needed. I get so mixed up. I am a "show me" kind of person.
    Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!!! :) :D

  24. #24
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    your compliments are making me misty. thank you so much.

    ANNE!!! Tune in on the 3rd, 2pm eastern USA time, or you'll miss the next class. :P

  25. #25

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    14
    I clicked on the icon, but nothing happened. Does this mean that it is closed now?

    Or, what did I do wrong.

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.