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Thread: Any Ideas For This?

  1. #1
    Member
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    Any Ideas For This?

    So in cleaning up the Singer featherweight 221 I got last weekend, I think I may have found out part of why it was given up: The gib screw in the bobbin area seems to have been snapped off. No wonder it made a metal slapping noise when I ran it by hand! I could replace it easily enough if it were just missing, but I don't think that there's anything I can do about this by myself. Unless there is some secret someone here knows? And is this the sort of thing that a regular OSMG could deal with, or am I going to need to find a specialist to send this machine to?

    Any ideas? Or sympathy. Sympathy is nice.

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  2. #2
    Member onthebrinkofdisaster's Avatar
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    Can you drill out the body of the screw?
    of course I dont know for sure , Just throwing i tout there. Im sorry

  3. #3
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    If you can't drill it out yourself, perhaps a machine shop in your area can help you out?
    We cannot hold a torch to light another's path without brightening our own. ~Ben Sweetland

  4. #4
    Super Member Rodney's Avatar
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    If you're not equipped to do it your sewing machine guy should be able to do it for you. The broken part of the screw needs drilled out and the hole will need to be re-tapped but it's certainly repairable.
    Rodney
    "Neglect to oil the machine will shorten its life and cause you

    trouble and annoyance" Quote from Singer Model 99 Manual

  5. #5
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    another method is to use a dremel and an abrasive cutting wheel (trimmed to be small) to cut a small slot in the end of the remaining bit and then try to screw it out. If the screw broke because they over tightened it you should be fine, if they broke it because it was stuck with rust, maybe not...

  6. #6
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveH View Post
    another method is to use a dremel and an abrasive cutting wheel (trimmed to be small) to cut a small slot in the end of the remaining bit and then try to screw it out. If the screw broke because they over tightened it you should be fine, if they broke it because it was stuck with rust, maybe not...
    That's what I'd try first.

  7. #7
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    Thanks, everyone. I was afraid that drilling was probably the answer. If the screw was larger, and I had the tools and confidence, I'd try SteveH's method, but I'm not personally comfortable trying to use an unfamiliar power tool on something the same diameter as a grain of rice. And it would proably take weeks to scratch a notch in the screw with hand tools.

    In case the local guy says no, anyone have any experience with a featherweight ship-in place?

  8. #8
    Senior Member isewman's Avatar
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    1 more voice. I would do what onthebrink---- would do. Take it to a machine shop. They will be able to help. I've been toa machine shop, a couple times. And they always been helpful. But not for taken a broken screw out. And they may even have the screw you need, or something similiar

  9. #9
    Junior Member
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    When I suggested machine shop, I meant literally, they should be able to handle the job; just no idea of the cost involved, but probably less than shipping her. Good luck!
    We cannot hold a torch to light another's path without brightening our own. ~Ben Sweetland

  10. #10
    Super Member Gladys's Avatar
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    I have never thought of a machine shop for something like this before. Wonder if the machine shop class at a local technical school could help?

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