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Thread: EARLY Elias Howe sewing machine

  1. #21
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Hmmm, flat black primer and satin laquer. That would work for treadle irons very well. Did you use spray cans or paint gun?
    Sweet Caroline

  2. #22
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    Steve how awesome to watch you tear down that little Howe piece by piece! I agree the flat black looks great! How long have you been interested in sewing machines? The task you have taken on would just blow most people's minds! Most people wouldn't do anything with a completely rusted/fused up machine - they'd just leave it as is - give up on it! You are amazing!

    Nancy

  3. #23
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Black is elegant. And I want to see that machine completed. It's interesting.

    Joe

  4. #24
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I wouldn't give up on that Howe machine - more modern machines can be used for parts - that one is way too unique - keep up the great work
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  5. #25
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    thanks folks for all of the great words and encouragement...

    um, to put "fear of fixing things" in perspective. It's 1970, i'm 9 years old. I live 1/2 the time on my grandparents farm in Western NY (the other half "in town" with Mom) I have a derelict 1957 Chevy in the weeds as my favorite toy. My Grandfather sees me "working" on the car with imaginary tools (pre internet) and hands me a set of wrenches, a socket set, an old card table, and a "Motor" manual (factory tech level service manual) says have fun, but if you make it run you can have it... Now it's 1972, in two weeks I'm moving to California with Mom and Step Dad, My grandfather in the passenger seat, I'm driving the car down the driveway, onto the dirt road, down the block and back. It was my going away gift. (Two years later we sold the chevy to a local racer who included a "lifetime" pitpass for me.

    I blame Grandpa for this issue.. hehe

  6. #26
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caroline S View Post
    Hmmm, flat black primer and satin laquer. That would work for treadle irons very well. Did you use spray cans or paint gun?
    It sure does..
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    Rattle can (Spray Can) I use the new "spray at any angle" stuff from my local Orchard Supply Hardware (Shameless plug)

  7. #27
    Super Member JudyTheSewer's Avatar
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    It is looking great!

  8. #28
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoJangles View Post
    How long have you been interested in sewing machines?
    I've been "interested" in them since getting my backside tanned for playing with my grandmothers treddle. I got my first machine when I was cleaning houses and found an old "dressmaker". That was probably 15 years ago. I learned to sew on it 10-12 years ago (it was in storage till then) and after sewing my first tent on it i started having issues with it. I took it to the local OSMG with the hope of getting a "trade in" on a new machine. (i was ignant)

    He told me that the issue was that in this old machine they had experimented with ONE of the new nylon gears and that was what had failed. He said that even the Manufacturer stopped supplying nylon as replacements and that they were ONLY available in metal. He explained that i would have to pay LOTS to get a machine that could do what this could. I got it.

    After that it was finding machines that could do specific stuff like a Viking 1030 zig zag with step down for "umph". Then a friend gave me his "old POS" Translate: 1910 Singer 28 portable in beat up bentwood case. That machine started the REAL issue because it needed me to fix it. then i fell in love with the mechanics of the older machines. (and they are cheap to acquire)

  9. #29
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    here is where I run into a issue.... I am not sure which path to take.
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    This a before and after with my wire wheel process.

    I have the ability to repair those surfaces to smooth. Some planishing (hammering smooth) and some gentle stock removal and it could be shiny again.

    Should I do that or do I acknowledge it's life and history by leaving it "as is" structurally?

    Happy Sunday.

  10. #30
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    Steve, I am really enjoying your thread here and nice work you are doing. As an antique restorer my feeling is to leave it as is showing the history and wear. In the antique business the motto the less you do is better and will not devalue the item. Now in this case it must be personal choice on your part. This said you are going to have a nice machine no matter what you do. I would go with your instincts and what makes you feel good.
    Skip
    Glenn W. Cleveland

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