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Thread: New-to-me Singer 66

  1. #1
    Super Member Kathy T.'s Avatar
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    New-to-me Singer 66

    Iím very excited to be working on my Christmas 2012 gift from a friend. My Singer Class 66 converted treadle was made Aug 11, 1925. It belonged to my friendís grandmother, then her mother and now me (since no one in her family wanted it and I am a quilter). I received it with all of its original attachments including the manual.

    I have been lurking here since Dec and have duly noted lots of valuable websites, videoís and the advice that you have provided to others. All have been extremely valuable and I finally had the confidence to start cleaning the machine. Thank you so much for being so willing to share your expertise!

    This is how it looked in the bobbin area when I started and then after I worked at it.

    And this was how it was sewing when I got it, halfway thru cleaning and now that Iíve done a good bit in the bobbin area. The top stitch always looked good, but the bobbin stitch was messed up Ė and now it looks beautiful. Iím so pleased.

    Now that the bobbin area is looking better and I didnít destroy anything, I will continue on to cleaning other parts of the machine.

    But first, I have a question about the motor and electrical parts. The motor is a Dayton brand AC-DC motor, 115 volts, 2M033. I have no idea when this treadle was converted, but apparently this model motor is still available. These are photos of the plugs and the foot pedal Ė should any of them be replaced for safety reasons?
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  2. #2
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    I have a Singer 66 that looks the same.. I cleaned her up, and I use her all the time. I LOVE her.. She is faithful, and has never let me down.
    Enjoy her, and take care of her.

  3. #3
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Kathy,

    The machine looks good to me. The plated parts are amber with old oil and could be cleaned to make them shiny.

    As for the motor I don't know if that brand is still available or not, but as long as it runs good and you keep it clean and oiled don't be concerned about it. The cord block is a standard set up used by many brands other than Singer and Kenmore. Rather than use complicated wiring set ups they used one cord for the motor and one for the light and plugged them into the cord block.
    The block is wired so the two outlets get power correctly. The light side is constant, the motor side is wired through the foot controller. All those look good in your pics.
    What you didn't show is the cord. If the cord is pliable and not cracked, dry rotted or gummy and there is no bare spots, it's good to go. Keep your eyes open for bare wires and cracks down the road though.
    The cord block is available from many sources as is motors, foot controllers and lights.

    The 66 is a great machine, I should know, I have 8 of them ...

    Joe

  4. #4
    Super Member Kathy T.'s Avatar
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    Thank you so much for the reassurance. I will check the cord. That's too funny that you have 8 of these machines ... I fell in love with just this one on the spot when I first saw her. I'll keep working until I achieve shine - she deserves it!

  5. #5
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Kathy,

    Just be easy on the cleaning. Cotton balls or a soft cotton cloth and machine oil is what I use. I've messed up a couple machines learning what not to use.

    Joe

  6. #6
    Super Member Kathy T.'s Avatar
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    Thanks, Joe.
    I will try to be careful. I was using a wooden skewer instead of a metal implement because one of the videos suggested that it was gentler. And I'm using a piece of an old cotton t-shirt now. Those kind of tips are really helpful!
    Kathy T.

  7. #7
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    There should be a cover with cutouts for the prongs on the plug, but the connections look good. I've seen cardboard protectors on old lamps, but I'd use something else if I were to make one.

  8. #8
    Super Member Kathy T.'s Avatar
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    Thanks, IrishRose. I'll check into that when I check the cord. Good catch!

  9. #9
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    It used to be that you could buy those plug protector disks at hardware stores. I've not seen them in years. I just use the paste board from the backs of tablets.

    Joe

  10. #10
    Super Member chris_quilts's Avatar
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    Cardboard from cereal boxes is usually my quick fix and then I find something different/better a bit later on.
    Through Him who strengthens me, I can do all things - Paul

    I meant to behave......but there were too many other options

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