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Thread: Singer Model 27 Crinkle, Perplexed

  1. #11
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    If you're not gonna use it, send me the cord block and the toasty, brittle and bare wire.

    Joe
    Serious??? If so, it is yours also. Otherwise it would be going in the dumpster. Ah, one woman's junk is another man's treasure!!!!!
    Sweet Caroline

  2. #12
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Yes, I'm serious.

    No wastum cordy block.



    Joe

  3. #13
    Senior Member DanofNJ's Avatar
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    It is beautiful and definitely worth restoring!

  4. #14
    Super Member ThayerRags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    I would say it's a rebuild. I've read that Singer authorized certain repair facilities to rebuild machines during and just after WW II. Those machines were painted with the black crinkle paint. What does look odd is the silver paint on the bottom. Joe
    I’m going to agree with Joe here, and disagree with him too...

    I agree that it’s a rebuild, but I doubt that a Singer shop did it. More likely, an independent shop did it, and probably in the late 40s or early 50s when electrification spread. The motor, handwheel, lead cord, and decals were available from a popular Wholesaler to turn treadle machines into electric machines. It was big business in the industry at that time. Many sewing machine owners had their treadle machines “electrified” when electricity finally reached their home. Orphaned machines were electrified to sell to new buyers.

    The decal set appears to be set #1261, available wholesale at $0.50 each, $5.50/Doz, or $40.00/100, and was in the 1951 catalog and probably earlier. Motors were $10 and up, and the handwheel was $2. The motor block and 6’ cord set (#700) was another $0.90 or $10 per dozen. Retail was probably double the wholesale price, plus labor to make the conversion.

    I would guess that the silver “paint” is possibly the primer coat that was applied to the entire machine before the paint was applied. Paint wasn’t needed under the machine where it wouldn’t be seen, but rust prevention was needed.

    It looks like they kept the original treadle belt-powered bobbin winder instead of replacing it with a belt guard-mounted one. I guess that the belt was simply stretched out around the BW when winding a bobbin?

    I enjoy the rebuilds because they’re not all the same. Shops did whatever they needed to do to get the machines running with the newest convenience to the homemaker...electricity!

    CD in Oklahoma
    "I sew, I sew, so it's off to work I go!!!"
    ThayerRags Fabric Center
    http://thayerrags.com/

  5. #15
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Thanks for the additional information CD. I knew this machine was certainly different. The crinkle finish is certainly not the same quality as the original Singer Crinkle. The finish is literally falling off the belt guard. I am thinking perhaps it was not prepped very well before re-painting. There was certainly not much taping prep because the stitch regulator knob was even sprayed. The machine itself is still seized up tight. I am waiting for the sun to appear today so I can sit it outside and heat up all of the oil and Liquid Wrench I sprayed inside.

    Caroline
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    Sweet Caroline

  6. #16
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    CD just described my #2 Singer 66 treadle. Thankfully they didn't paint it as the red eye decals are in decent shape.
    Electrified it, removed the treadle plate, pitman arm, big wheel and guard in the process.

    But I prevailed. I returned her back to a treadle and she sews very nice.

    Joe

  7. #17
    Senior Member redbugsullivan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    If you're not gonna use it, send me the cord block and the toasty, brittle and bare wire.

    Rewiring foot controllers is a piece of double dutch chocolate cake.

    Joe
    I'm trying to show her how easy it is to fix these gems! You may hear from her if I am not successful!!
    Annette

    There is no fireside like your own fireside.

  8. #18
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Rewireing motors and foot controllers is fairly easy. Some motors are a bit of pain but they are all usually rewireable. I've yet to find an old foot controller I couldn't rewire. Adjusting them can be a pain though.
    There is supposed to be a tutorial on Yahoo about adjusting them but I can't find it. It seems to be a secret or something because those that tell me it's there won't give me the URL. Oh well.

    Joe

  9. #19
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    mmmm...cake! Love the conversation!

  10. #20
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    27 Crinkle update

    This machine has been the ONLY one that I have not been able to fix. It was seized up completely. Or so I thought. It was sprayed with Triflow, Liquid Wrench, and more Triflow. It sat out in the sun and baked. That did not work. I then decided to see exactly where the problem was. I disconnected the bar that moved the bobbin shuttle, it moved freely. So, that is not the problem. The problem is in the upper mechanism.

    Well, since I figured that this machine was on it's way to being a boat anchor, I took drastic measures. It is called a "Monkey Wrench". Horrors, but yes, I did it. Things are turning, not freely though a full cycle. I will take some pictures today to show you where I think the real problem is and see if any of you any fixit ideas.

    My OJCG owes me BIG on this one. But it is "my bad" for not running her first or see if her parts move. Lesson learned!
    Sweet Caroline

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