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Thread: Singer, Model 66-4, Arm Shaft removal

  1. #1
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    Singer, Model 66-4, Arm Shaft removal

    Im in the process of doing a complete restore on a 1925, Singer model 66-4. The machine has been sitting in storage for over 20 years, and just recently I aquired it. I got it home, and after cleaning it up a bit, i relized the machine was the perfect one for me to do my first full restoration. I have strip[ped the machine of every part, (made sure i took extensive pictures as I was removing them..then cleaned every part..But i have 3 parts that for the life of me i can't get out of the machine head. Arm Shaft #32617, Arm Shaft Bushing # 32503, and the Feed Cam # 32562.

    Ever lock screw, nutt, you name it is out of this machine, so Im figuring the Arm Shaft Bushing, is pressure seated, now if thats the case i will have to beat it out..but my question is..from the inside out? or outside in? what tool would be best to get it out with?

    Any help I can get will be thankful..I'm ready to get this thing sand blasted and painted, so I can get all the parts coving my desk back to where they belong, so I can start my next project.

    If you need pictures to see exactly what im talking about, please let me know.

    <<<<<will look forward to the reply

  2. #2
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    WOW! I hope you took a lot of pictures and labeled everything. Was it rusted solid? Were you planning to repaint it? There are automotive paint shops in every town - I bet they could use up their extra paint on it when you get it painted. You might have it back in a couple days by having it painted locally.

    Most of those old machines will clean up just fine by a gentle cleaning. Clean off lint with a fine brush. There is a varnish on them that protects them from rusting - I think it is a good idea to just leave that varnish on. A good oiling inside and down under is what they really need to get them turning very freely and sounding good. Chrome cleaner will clean up the chrome parts - doesn't do the decals any good so keep it off them. Clean off the machine with a bit of sewing machine oil and you should be good to go.

    Muv has some excellent videos on cleaning a vintage sewing machine. HOW TO CLEAN UP and use a vintage sewing machine - videos by Muv and Fav I find her videos very informative and relaxing to watch

    Finally, Glen knows how to get those back together and he might coach you to get it working again if he has time.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  3. #3
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    Singer Model 66-4

    Thanks for the input, Im pretty much a hands on man as you might have figured out. I'll be painting the unit myself using automotive paint. 2 layers of color coat, maybe 3 then serveral clear coats, but still haven't desided if I will atempt to recreate the original 2 layer silver/gold foil Decal, or design my own. Either way this old girl will shine once again and find herself back on a treadle base, and ready to work while looking pretty.

    Would definitly like to hear from Glenn, sounds to me he might be a wonderful resourse. It just hit me, I recieved a call from a gentalman named Glenn who was referred to me by Singer, yesterday after noon, and he lives in Tampa Florida, this wouldn't be the same Glenn by chance?

  4. #4
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Glen lives in Hunstville, AL - you can pm - he is a board member
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

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