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Thread: Tim the toolman you are not! What were they thinking?

  1. #21
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    Oh and the insulation on the cord actually on the motor that all this is supposed to attach to crumbled when I touched it. SCARY !!!

  2. #22
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    I've had a couple like that. They crack all the way inside the motor too, all the way to the coils. I'm glad you didn't plug it in!
    Tammi - I've found that many baby steps tend to get you further than a huge leap in followed by a huge leap out - http://www.archaicarcane.com
    Singer 431G, 411G, 301A, 2x 221 (featherweight), 222k - the holy grail, 99, 115, 15-90 Centennial, 27, VS2, 28 hc, 128 knee bar, 201-2, Pfaff 130-6. Non-Vintage - Pfaff 6122, Kenmore (Janome) 385.81595 serger, Kenmore (Janome) 385.81155, 2013 APQS Lucey

  3. #23
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonnaMiller View Post
    301s are going to be the next hot thing like the FWs. They have already gone up in price. I haul mine to quilting classes rather than wear on the FW. I like sewing on it better anyway. Don't have to worry about it. Mine was nasty too when it arrived. I have become quite attached to it. They are still quite affordable, but going up every day.
    I'm selling machines other than FW and 301 here, too. Nothing is 'hot' unless people know about the vintage machines. I'm finding young people are the ones that are buying the vintage machines. Many of them have heard that the vintage machines are going to hold up better than the plastic wonders. Some have had plastic wonders and they didn't hold up. Some have searched on line to find if a machine is any good or not. Some have found out from their grandma's. Then I have had a lot of men buy vintage machines. Motor cycle people seems to go for vintage. People who work on machinery know. Some of the men have tried to use their wife's machine and gotten the word - buy your own - I don't know how the men end up with a vintage machine but their wife uses a plastic wonder... Then I have seen women with the expensive computerized machines come after some machine like one they learned on - regret that they didn't keep it - but some find it is cheaper to buy some old vintage machine to do straight stitch than to have their expensive machine serviced. What ever reason vintage machines ARE coming back... slowly but they are coming back. I think it all boils down to how well you get to know a machine and make it work for your needs.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  4. #24
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArchaicArcane View Post
    I've had a couple like that. They crack all the way inside the motor too, all the way to the coils. I'm glad you didn't plug it in!
    I've seen it a lot here, too. Keeping an old machine in a shed, garage or basement = FAIL.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  5. #25
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    "Sewing machines" are by nature maintenance intensive. Very much like the old steam locomotives. They need oil, care, proper storage, cleaning and use if they are to remain in good condition.
    Ignore them and they deteriorate.

    Joe

  6. #26
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    "Sewing machines" are by nature maintenance intensive. Very much like the old steam locomotives. They need oil, care, proper storage, cleaning and use if they are to remain in good condition.
    Ignore them and they deteriorate.

    Joe
    yes use them and use them and use them.... best thing to do...
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  7. #27
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    "Sewing machines" are by nature maintenance intensive. Very much like the old steam locomotives. They need oil, care, proper storage, cleaning and use if they are to remain in good condition.
    Ignore them and they deteriorate.

    Joe
    And take care of them, and they go forever! Like some of the trains you see on the UK shows.
    Tammi - I've found that many baby steps tend to get you further than a huge leap in followed by a huge leap out - http://www.archaicarcane.com
    Singer 431G, 411G, 301A, 2x 221 (featherweight), 222k - the holy grail, 99, 115, 15-90 Centennial, 27, VS2, 28 hc, 128 knee bar, 201-2, Pfaff 130-6. Non-Vintage - Pfaff 6122, Kenmore (Janome) 385.81595 serger, Kenmore (Janome) 385.81155, 2013 APQS Lucey

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