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Thread: Timing Gone.

  1. #31
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    All I can say is that you should run from that repair store and never go back. I can't believe they'd tell you that when the needle was just in wrong. Eeeeek.

  2. #32
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Wrong needle! The sewing machine shop should have figured that one out right away. That does not make one very comfortable or confident with them. I would call them up and tell them you FIXED the machine yourself and it only cost you the price of a NEW needle.
    Sweet Caroline

  3. #33
    Senior Member vanginney's Avatar
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    I dont want to press my luck. He mentioned he got it going briefly, but that it slips...can't remember his exact words...so maybe in a few days...it will stop working. I am crossing my fingers it doesn't! We live in a small city with only 2 quilt stores. One deals with PFAFF and a few other brands & the other deals with Bernina. I dont want to make a fuss or I will feel awkward going in to shop.

    Think I will keep my little secret to myself. The funny part he said he spent 2 hours, oiling, replacing the tension mechanism, front plate...but didn't charge me for the service. Dont know if I could have figured it out with the tension parts on in the wrong order

    Everything happens for a reason, and I have learned so much from this forum. Everyone has been so kind. Best.

  4. #34
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    I'm with Candace on this one. I'd do just what you did and ask for help, then fix it myself before I'd go back into that shop.

    There are a bunch of gals on this forum that know more about machines than those that messed with yours. If they can learn to fix them so can you.

    Sew for a bit then slipped??????? Arrrgggggghhhhh ........

    Might be worth taking sewing machine repair training and opening your own shop where you fix anything. Hmmmm, now that's an idea.

    Joe

  5. #35
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    If you can follow directions to make a quilt you can do about anything on one of these vintage sewing machines. My little hand can fit in the tight places and handle the tiny little screws. I am armed with Triflo, a screw driver, some classes, internet and some videos. I can do it! I have learned a lot just tinkering with old junk machines - stuff I never thought would work can be made to work eventually. Don't let the machine know you don't know what you are doing and you will amaze yourself...
    Joe does the rust bucket machines for a challenge. I suggest you start with something a little easier.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  6. #36
    Super Member jlm5419's Avatar
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    Adding my voice to the others, these old machines are relatively easy to maintain and repair. I even managed to replace the needle bar on a Singer 99 with very little help from DH. This board and the internet in general (google is your friend) are great ways to get advice. I learned the bit about needle direction on my 201. I had bought it at an auction and thought it wouldn't sew. It was several years before I obtained a manual and discovered I just had the needle in backwards.
    jlm5419-an Okie in California
    http://according-to-ginger.blogspot.com/

  7. #37
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Glad to hear you got it up and running. I was pretty skeptical about it being worn out too. Those machines can take a lot of abuse before they "wear out".

    I'm in Alberta (close to Edmonton). If you ever come this way, I'd be happy to show you anything I know about maintaining these machines. There's no reason for timing to "slip" in normal usage, unless someone's forgotten to tighten the set screws. I can even show you how to check and set timing so you never have to take it into a shop like that again.

    I agree, the only thing you should be using that shop for is notions and "consumables", and possibly not even for that. I would personally call the owner, and tell them that their technician is sending money out the door.
    Tammi - I've found that many baby steps tend to get you further than a huge leap in followed by a huge leap out - http://www.archaicarcane.com
    Singer 411G, 301A, 2x 221 (featherweight), 222k - the holy grail, 15-90 Centennial, 27, VS2, 28 hc, 128 knee bar, 201-2, 31-15, Pfaff 130-6. Non-Vintage - Pfaff 6122, Kenmore (Janome) 385.81595 serger, Kenmore (Janome) 385.81155, 2013 APQS Lucey

  8. #38
    Senior Member vanginney's Avatar
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    Thanks Tammi. If I ever go west, I will look you up! It sews but sounds a bit louder and less smooth than the 201-3. I oiled it twice now all over.

    Just bought a FW this morning, and promise my DH this will be my last one! It will arrive after the 17th. I have never seen one in person and am looking forward to the mini.

    I would love to see some of the ones you list in your tag...

  9. #39
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    they are louder than a 201
    try turning the machines by hand and see how they sound - it could just be the motor is noisy.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  10. #40
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    The 15s and 201s are made differently internally. Tilt them back on their hinges and look at the bottom. Different.
    Different tension set ups, different bobbin set ups, different in the arm, different in the pillar.

    Similar but different. Each machine will make it's own sounds, you'll get used to their differences.

    Joe

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