Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Touch & Sew information for J Miller

  1. #1
    Junior Member MadCow333's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    PA, NC, or as-paid
    Posts
    237

    Touch & Sew information for J Miller

    This is what I found from my old files archive. As I stated in an earlier discussion, there are some contradictions about whether all 620s have metal gears or not. This says the metal gears were changed to nylon in 1965.

    Date: Mon, 08 Feb 1999 11:31:35 +0500
    From: Elizabeth & Steven Myer <msmjem@iquest.net>
    Subject: Singer Touch and Sew models

    Hello Feathers - Many of you have contacted me saying that you would like
    more information on the Touch and Sew models and I think it only fair that I
    share what information I've gotten. Like it or not, the Touch and Sew
    models are a part of vintage sewing machine history and Singer did have some
    very innovative ideas in creating them...I think we should know about them
    even if we personally do not choose to add one to our collection. But, I
    will leave that decision up to you.

    In responses I've received, yea or nay, it runs neck and neck. About the
    same number of people love them as condemn them....same as in my quilt
    group. There seems to be no middle ground where they are concerned...either
    you love them or hate them. To that end, I leave opinions to those who have
    them because the debate will probably continue to seesaw this way and that
    indefinitely depending on what experiences individual sewers have had with
    the various models.

    Here are some Facts:

    1. Touch and Sew is a designation given to all the Singer 600 and 700
    series machines that filled the bobbin in place.

    2. All Touch and Sew models were slant needle machines and all the machines
    use the same attachments....with the exception of the cams. All 600 series
    machines used only black cams...The 700 series used the black and the white
    (stretch stitch - called "flexi-stitch") cams.

    3. The first models were the 600, 603 and 604. These were problem machines
    mostly because a wind in place bobbin was a new concept and sewers would not
    remember to release a button on the bed of the machine when the bobbin
    winding was completed...and this caused problems.

    4. Next models made were the 600e, 603e and 604e. On these models, the
    bobbin winder was released by simply closing the side plate and thus
    eliminated the previous problem.

    5. Sometime around 1965, Singer replaced the metal gears with plastic ones
    which turned out to be a big mistake because the gears would perform well
    for quite a while, but as they wore down, they caused trouble.

    Models 630, 640 and the 700s have these plastic gears. The older models,
    600 through the 620 series have metal gears.

    6. In 1970, Singer introduced the first machine in their history that had
    "stretch stitches." This was the 700 series. In this series, timing gears
    were replaced with belts and the tension on the top thread had to be exactly
    correct or the machine would jam and cause problems.

    7. "Golden" Touch and Sew models were the top of the line in the 620s,
    630s, 640s series and on into the 750 model. Says "Golden Touch and Sew" on
    the side panel.

    8. Touch and Sew models were replaced by the Futura which, in turn, was
    replaced by the Creative Touch series.

    9. There are different panel colors...it denotes the different models.

    10. There were identical Singer sewing machines made that looked like the
    Touch and Sew, but they did not have the wind in place bobbins - These were
    not Touch and Sew models.

    Some info from manuals on particular models - features:

    1. 750 - Top of the Line - called Golden Touch and Sew. Has built in
    stitches plus many cams to do fancy stitches (uses both black cams and white
    "flexi-stitch" cams.) Has rubber feed dogs.

    2. 758 - Came out around 1970 - Have to add cams for all stitches except
    for the straight stitch. Much like the Golden Touch and Sew 750 in all
    other aspects.

    3. 770 - Touch and Sew II - Approximately 1976 - Has a free arm feature.
    No built-in self-threader. Has rubber feed dogs which will disintegrate in
    time and expecially if the presser foot is placed down directly on the feed
    dogs without any fabric in between.

    4. 771 - Another Touch and Sew II - Approximately 1977 - Has a free arm.
    No cams but all the stitches are built in - 6 built-in regular stitches and
    4 built-in flexi-stitches.

    Final Thoughts:
    Based on feedback I received concerning these machines....

    The Touch and Sew models were developed with a wind in place bobbin feature
    that was unheard of in other sewing machines, and even today, is a feature
    that only Singer attempted. Unfortunately, the consumer, the machine, and
    the Singer Company came together at a time when none of them were in top
    form......the Singer Company was in financial straits and they cut corners
    where they shouldn't have in an attempt to cut costs....thereby more
    "lemons" were on the market than ordinarily would have been. The machine
    was different than other sewing machines that had been on the market - it
    was not a machine for the beginner seamstress. The Singer Company offered
    free training classes on these machines but few people took the time to
    properly learn all the aspects of this new machine. The Singer Company also
    made a huge mistake in allowing this kind of machine to ever enter schools
    as part of the education of young sewers. It was not the kind of machine
    that could stand up to that kind of careless or untrained handling.

    Admittedly, many people reported that Touch and Sew machines skipped
    stitches on tricot; broke needles over heavy seams and tangled the bobbin
    when filling....but many were wonderful workhorses and are still out there
    performing well for their owners. Many of the complaints that I have
    received about Touch and Sew machines centered around the 700 series. The
    early 600 series get many more positive comments. But, remember too, that
    quilting in the 1970s was on the wane and sewing with knits, especially
    "bonded knits" in clothing was the main thing....and Singer attempted to
    make a machine that sewed these fine, stretchy, and sometimes "crawly" knits...

    I leave the final analysis to you as to the merit of the Touch and Sew
    machines. After doing this research, I am a lot smarter now and have more
    of an idea of what to look for when and if I run across one in my outings
    ....and I hope after reading this, you find it helpful as well. Frankly,
    I'm glad I did this research into these interesting machines. At this point
    in time, I do not own a Touch and Sew ... but who knows what tomorrow brings?

    Many thanks to Jim, Mort, Carol and all the others who responded to my
    request and took the time to talk to me and share their knowledge of Singer
    Touch and Sew machines. I appreciate it very, very much. You are wonderful
    folks!

    Please continue to share information and personal experiences you've had
    about a particular series or model on this digest ...that way we all learn.
    And, please, be sure to read (and I'm going to keep!) Moonsage's comments
    about the Touch and Sews - especially concerning the bobbins and their
    tendencies. (FWFanatics digest 2/5/99). (And, by the way, I noticed the
    other day that JoAnn Fabrics - at least in Indianapolis) carries Touch and
    Sew bobbins!)

    Good Luck to you all - Fellow Feather - Elizabeth in Indiana >^..^<

    600 Story Lamx
    (53/M/Southern Maryland) Mar 30 1999
    1:06PM EST
    Saturday, my daughter brought me a 600 she picked up in a thrift store. It was frozen solid, but only took a few minutes to break it loose and get it running again. After run-in, I reassembled to check the stitching and couldn't get the bobbin case in place. I worked a half hour on that thing and it just wouldn't slide into place. What I found was that you can't reinstall the BC on a Touch & Sew with the bottom plate off because the weight of the head presses down on the bobbin winder mechanism and causes it to pop up, and then there is not enough room for the BC to fit into the race. Lesson learned.

    Ed

    From: sewwhat@together.net
    Date: Mon, 15 Feb 1999 19:56:42 -0500
    Subject: some interesting discussions lately!

    Hello all,

    For all the questions about the touch and sew type singer machines, here
    are a few answers.

    The first touch and sews were made with 6 steel gears. Good, but noisy
    when they wore from no grease and require just about perfect balancing
    to keep quiet.

    The second wave of the touch and sews were made with 6 plastic gears.
    The life span is up on the plastic that was used in the 5 gears
    EXcluding the white arm shaft gear. So if you have one with the original
    gears still intact you can expect one or all of them to break at any
    time.

    It is almost NEVER necessary to change the white arm shaft gear. Don't
    be sold on that if you see that there are no teeth no missing on it.

    The third wave of touch and sews and the spanish, Singer 'Bobbina
    Magica', used a cogged timing belt as do just about all sewing machines
    today.

    An experienced technician can change a 750, 758, 756 etc timing belt,
    re-time and sew-in, in approximately 30 minutes. The same time for
    changing all 5 gears in an older touch and sew.

  2. #2
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    5,872
    MadCow333,

    Thanks for the information. We traded into a T&S 778 a month or so ago. Some cleaning and a replacement light assembly and it's up and running. Having a bit of trouble winding the bobbins though. Seems the thread wants to get under the bobbin and make a wad.

    The machine is noisy. Mostly sounds like the new plastic wonder motors. Not sure why, it's not binding, but it might just be from lack of use.

    I'll save your information, it does help with a number of questions we had.

    Joe

  3. #3
    cjr
    cjr is offline
    Super Member cjr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Las Vegas NV
    Posts
    1,284
    My primary machine is a 778. It gets very heavy usage. Re bobbin issues mentioned above, I have found if I remove bobbin after winding and cut start thread to make sure it is inside plastic it works better. Also bobbin area does not like lint. Every time I change bobbin I clean that area; also likes to be oiled very often especially in this South west desert. Do not over wind. Sewing Macine DR (repair shop) gave me this advise. He has not seen my machine since. Also my DH takes it apart and cleans & oils its innards. He does maintence on all my vintage machines.

    Mad cow great info
    www.etsy.com/shop/quiltinglycaroline

  4. #4
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    5,872
    cjr,

    A couple questions if you don't mind.

    First is your machine noisy? Ours makes an electronic hum as it starts and has a rattlely vibration at different speeds. Sounds like the motor. But I don't know.

    I tried what you said after filling a bobbin, seemed to work a bit better. But as I tried to do back tacs and sometimes as I was sewing the thread would get caught twice around the bobbin carrier and jam the works up. I upped the top tension two numbers and seems to have cured that. Have you ever had that happen to you?

    Basically the machine seems to be sewing good, no real problems but we have only been doing straight stitches so far.

    Joe

  5. #5
    cjr
    cjr is offline
    Super Member cjr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Las Vegas NV
    Posts
    1,284
    Hi Joe, No hum. 778 no more noisy then my 400, but I keep them well oiled especially bobbin area. I have not had tension problems. Sometimes I have trouble when i'm tired or machine is tired also don't laugh during a full moon.
    Dull needles will make noise. I hope your issues resolve themselves. This machine was top of the line in 1976. Also not a really common machine.
    www.etsy.com/shop/quiltinglycaroline

  6. #6
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    5,872
    cjr,

    I suspect this machine had been sitting for quite a while before I got it. I've oiled and greased it as well as cleaned it. I just finished putting together a strip of 36 3 1/2" squares for a quilt I'm starting and as I used it it seemed to begin to ease up. I also adjusted the top tension a bit and the thread problems stopped.

    It just needs to be used I do think.

    Joe

  7. #7
    cjr
    cjr is offline
    Super Member cjr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Las Vegas NV
    Posts
    1,284
    I'm happy your machine is feeling better. No machine or person likes to be neglected. Keep me posted.
    www.etsy.com/shop/quiltinglycaroline

  8. #8
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    5,872
    cjr,

    No sooner did I post that, then it started acting up. I read all the instructions in the manual on how to set it for the flexi-stitch cams and put the duck cam in. Beautiful patterns.
    Then I tried two other white cams and they would not snap on the cam drive properly. Ended up causing a big thread jam as the poor machine tried to follow a wobbling cam that suddenly popped off the shaft.
    Then I went back to the back ZZ cam, reset the controls and it knotted up the thread under and around the bobbin to the point the machine was totally jammed.
    At that point I got up and walked away from it.

    My wife later cleared the thread jam and got it working, but something's not right with some of the cams.

    I'll get back to it some day. I've got other projects to work on first.

    Joe

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Southeast Michigan
    Posts
    336
    Hey Joe, just some thoughts. . .
    - perhaps the cams giving you trouble have a bad history -- like someone trying them out in one of the 600 series or another cam machine so they aren't right.
    - regarding the bobbin jams -- I've noticed a couple things that triggered that (besides those discussed already). If I had short leader thread (both top and bottom) when I started sewing, it sometimes dropped into the bobbin and the first stitches became a rats nest. Got into the habit of holding onto the thread as I started. Also found that if I didn't stop when I did the back stitch to start before I charged forward, I made another mess. As I got older and slowed down a bit, both the machine and I behave a bit better. Not winning too many races with the car anymore either. Lastly, you probably have already checked this, but I did have to replace the bobbin holder after my daughter created a nice jam. She got "stuck" and yanked. I cleaned it up but still had some problems. The new holder has been working for 20 years now.

    Not sure if any of this helps, but who can tell? Good luck!

  10. #10
    cjr
    cjr is offline
    Super Member cjr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Las Vegas NV
    Posts
    1,284
    Not all my cams work like they should, especially the flex stitch ones. I wonder if it's becausr we're using them on cotton instead of knits. I would enjoy using some for decoratrive stitching, but don't want hassel.
    www.etsy.com/shop/quiltinglycaroline

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.