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Thread: Vintage Japanese Clone????

  1. #1
    Junior Member shelburn's Avatar
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    Question Vintage Japanese Clone????

    I had questions about a machine that I acquired from the "Free Store" at our sanitary landfill. It came without any information and few extras, but the basic machine was in tact with it's white plastic cover. Posted a query last week on this forum asking for help identifying her.
    I had one reply that a picture was needed, so I worked last week cleaning her for her photo session and of course, did simple maintenance as well. At first, I could not get the top thread to pick up the bobbin thread, so I removed a few screws and checked on the bobbin case assembly. It seemed o.k. so I cleaned it and put it back together, noting that the mechanism was almost a duplicate to my Janome. I put a new needle in, replaced the rusty metal bobbin with a plastic bobbin from the Janome that was the same size, noted that the needle threaded from left side to right, plugged her in, and with crossed fingers, pressed the foot peddle. Woww!!
    A beautiful straight stitch was produced as well as the different zig zag width stitches. Quiet, smooth and sweet!
    the machine is a light tan color and looks to have very few scratches. I would venture to say it has not had much use. Not bad for a throw-away freebee!
    Still would like to know if anyone can add to the information I have gleaned through searching the internet. Seems that there were many of these machines made after WWII in Japan and imported by companies like Gimbles, Sears, etc., and various names were given to them. They were well made, sturdy work horses in many different colors, such as sea grean, bright blue, yellow and even fire-engine red! Mine is a very demure tan color.
    As to the picture, I didn't have any luck trying to post pictures. However, just yesterday I put in a search for "Japanese Morse Model #1550A sewing machine" and got a hit immediately for it on E-Bay. If you check out the vintage machines with that phrase, you will see an exact picture of what my machine looks like.
    I am curious to know if the machine is related to my Janome (New Home) machine, and if it is possible to find a manual for it. I think I will add her to my growing collection, which is up to six now. I love the sturdy, even, quiet way it makes stitches.
    It was fun researching it and am a little let down now that I have finished with to search. Hope someone can add to the information that I already have!
    Enjoy your life, it's the only one you have!

  2. #2
    Junior Member JMCDA's Avatar
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    is this your machine? - lifted this photo from e-bay
    Attached Images Attached Images Click to view large image 

  3. #3
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    If that is your machine, it's not exactly a Japanese 15 clone, but it was certainly made in Japan and based on U.S. made sewing machines. Anyway, most machines from Japan during that period are good, and since they are all steel will last a long time. I think you got a good machine.

    For posting pictures, you have to go into a picture manager program and resize the pictures so they are under the limits of this board. Read the "How to Post Pictures" info in the Pictures folder.

  4. #4
    Junior Member shelburn's Avatar
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    Yes, that is my machine. It needed some figuring out, but have it working nicely. Makes a nice stitch. But the needle position is way to the left. And the zig zag stitch works from there. is this normal for this model?? Anyone have any ideas where to get a manual for this type of machine?
    Also since posting, I have acquired another Japanese machine, a Dressmaker De Lux, zig zig model S 3000. Again, with a little cleaning and oiling, it runs and makes a beautiful stitch. Has a case identical to the "Morse" but needed wiring. Hubby took care of that and this machine has a positioning leaver for the needle so it can be placed to left, center or right. Want to try doing some free motion quilting on it. Again, would like to find a manual for it. Will watch this post with hope that someone can help!!
    Enjoy your life, it's the only one you have!

  5. #5
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Yours is not a clone - possibly was made by Janome.
    Open the nose cover and take off the top lid thing, push side to side on the needle bar - follow it to where it goes in and out - clean and oil - follow it to your right as far as you can - clean and oil. Also clean behind the lever - let your eye travel to where there is some kind of movement - clean and oil. That might fix the needle position. It should be a good basic machine - not as fun as a red one though.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  6. #6
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Shelburn,

    I have a Japanese made DIAL 'n SEW machine that is very similar to yours. It's needle parks to the left when on straight stitch too. I've found off set straight stitch and satin presser feet for it at my local sewing machine shop. Mine is also takes long shank feet which complicates finding them.
    It too makes a beautiful straight stitch and a wonderful zig-zag. No cams and it only has a couple adjustments for varying the stitches.

    It too was a rescued machine. My wife found it tossed out on the curb for trash pick up after a yard sale. Snatched it most quickly. All it needed was a bobbin case and some glue for the damaged wooden case. Easily done.

    These are excellent machines. Not fancy nor modern but with proper lubing they'll last three lifetimes.

    Joe

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