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Thread: Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

  1. #38561
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    I know, Sharon!! Amazing....they just don't see or know the value of these old girls. This is the history of the sewing machine in the USA. A good thing some of us want to preserve them and use them to keep them going.

    How you been? Feels like I've been away for years instead of just a few months!! LOL

  2. #38562
    Senior Member Crossstitcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jljack View Post
    Hi Everyone! I've been away from here for a while, due to access issues with my work computer, but appears I can get back on. Hope everyone is good. I lurk sometimes from home, and I see Charlee has had some health issues. I sent her a PM last night.

    Well, I got another old Davis VF1...it's probably 1893. I got it locally, which was amazing!! Not in great shape, but she sews well. The cabinet is damaged, so DH has some work to do. He has it clamped together right now so it won't shake apart when I treadle her. The coffin top is with it (amazingly!), but it's damaged, too, so another repair job. Overall I'm very happy with her...she came with some of her attachments and some needles and some bobbins. She was in the same family for about 85 years, and stored in a hot garage for the last 35 years. I'm glad I got to rescue her...the guy's mother was going to take her to the dump!! Here's a pic.
    We have one like yours. I think they are so pretty. Hope to move a machine out of sewing room and put mine in and use it. Have fun with yours. BTW how have you been?
    Quilting with a friend keeps me in stitches.

    Trish

  3. #38563
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jljack View Post
    I know, Sharon!! Amazing....they just don't see or know the value of these old girls. This is the history of the sewing machine in the USA. A good thing some of us want to preserve them and use them to keep them going.

    How you been? Feels like I've been away for years instead of just a few months!! LOL
    Glad to have you back with us. I'm doing fine and enjoying the newest girl in the herd. Gertrude, the Pfaff 60 treadle. Here she is in all her glory. She has a Singer spoked hand wheel on her now and a belt; due to the larger drive wheel, requires a longer belt. Had to order one from Cindy Peters. We're making scrappy log cabin blocks.
    Vintage Sewing Machine Shop Machine Photos
    Sharon
    Last edited by purplefiend; 10-15-2012 at 02:31 PM.

  4. #38564
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    How can I put this .......

    OK, here's a try. In the past machines were made with pride, out of materials that would last 4 lifetimes. People had little disposable income and when they shelled out that very hard earned money the things they bought had to work and to last.
    Sewing machines are a prime example.
    There was the great depression that crippled our country for a while. The old machines that were being used labored on.
    Then WW II and 5 years of more hardship.

    After that things changed. Prosperity happened. Jobs, manufacturing, income it all increased as our economy boomed. Lots of people had more money than they knew what to do with. Why use the old treadle Gramma had, I'll buy a new machine.
    Because of the manufacturing advances made during the war things began to be made cheaper. Just look at the stamped metal and plastic that came about not 15 years after WW II. The quality and longevity of things began to diminish and many were just tossed aside as they aged and no longer worked.
    Over the years this mindset has gotten ingrained into the last two generations. Young people today have more disposable income than their parents or grand parents or gggrand parents did, and have lost the pride of ownership. Why try to fix it, I'll just go buy another one, it's cheaper. And that brings me to now. With a small group of exceptions, modern sewing machines are nothing to be proud of. Plastic, stamped metal, crude castings. Throw away junque. The electronic or computer controlled ones are the worst. When one dinky little electronic thing dies, they cost so much to fix it's not worth it. Junk, junk, junk for the most part. No pride left in our manufacturers and nothing to be proud of owning.
    This attitude is passed on to those older machines, young folks by the large have no sense of history or of what lead us to where we are now. They live for the day and couldn't care less about yesterday.

    I look at my old machines and wish they had the ability to tell their stories. Especially those made before the wars. Machines that made clothes, curtains, bedding, diapers, napkins and so forth. Machines that I am refurbishing so they'll last another lifetime. That is, "IF" I can find someone who cares, to sell, give, or bequeath to.

    Other than those on the several sewing forums that care for the antiques and vintage machines I know nobody personally to pass them on to.

    My wife and I are not getting any younger, all I can do is hope that when we're gone those old machines we still have will be passed on to someone who cares.

    Now I've made myself depressed ......

    Joe

  5. #38565
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    How can I put this .......

    OK, here's a try. In the past machines were made with pride, out of materials that would last 4 lifetimes. People had little disposable income and when they shelled out that very hard earned money the things they bought had to work and to last.
    Sewing machines are a prime example.
    There was the great depression that crippled our country for a while. The old machines that were being used labored on.
    Then WW II and 5 years of more hardship.

    After that things changed. Prosperity happened. Jobs, manufacturing, income it all increased as our economy boomed. Lots of people had more money than they knew what to do with. Why use the old treadle Gramma had, I'll buy a new machine.
    Because of the manufacturing advances made during the war things began to be made cheaper. Just look at the stamped metal and plastic that came about not 15 years after WW II. The quality and longevity of things began to diminish and many were just tossed aside as they aged and no longer worked.
    Over the years this mindset has gotten ingrained into the last two generations. Young people today have more disposable income than their parents or grand parents or gggrand parents did, and have lost the pride of ownership. Why try to fix it, I'll just go buy another one, it's cheaper. And that brings me to now. With a small group of exceptions, modern sewing machines are nothing to be proud of. Plastic, stamped metal, crude castings. Throw away junque. The electronic or computer controlled ones are the worst. When one dinky little electronic thing dies, they cost so much to fix it's not worth it. Junk, junk, junk for the most part. No pride left in our manufacturers and nothing to be proud of owning.
    This attitude is passed on to those older machines, young folks by the large have no sense of history or of what lead us to where we are now. They live for the day and couldn't care less about yesterday.

    I look at my old machines and wish they had the ability to tell their stories. Especially those made before the wars. Machines that made clothes, curtains, bedding, diapers, napkins and so forth. Machines that I am refurbishing so they'll last another lifetime. That is, "IF" I can find someone who cares, to sell, give, or bequeath to.

    Other than those on the several sewing forums that care for the antiques and vintage machines I know nobody personally to pass them on to.

    My wife and I are not getting any younger, all I can do is hope that when we're gone those old machines we still have will be passed on to someone who cares.

    Now I've made myself depressed ......

    Joe
    and here is my 2 cents... Go green young ladies!
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  6. #38566
    Super Member vintagemotif's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jljack View Post
    Well, I got another old Davis VF1...it's probably 1893. I got it locally, which was amazing!! Not in great shape, but she sews well. The cabinet is damaged, so DH has some work to do. He has it clamped together right now so it won't shake apart when I treadle her. The coffin top is with it (amazingly!), but it's damaged, too, so another repair job. Overall I'm very happy with her...she came with some of her attachments and some needles and some bobbins. She was in the same family for about 85 years, and stored in a hot garage for the last 35 years. I'm glad I got to rescue her...the guy's mother was going to take her to the dump!! Here's a pic.
    Janice, That Davis cabinet looks very nice. I'm glad that you are the new steward. Good to see you back on the QB!
    I took a peek of your Big Red Oceans Waves on your friend's blog. Your quilt is gorgeous!!!

  7. #38567
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mizkaki View Post
    Nancy,

    I saw Laura's red table last week. It looks so much better in person than in the picture.
    And her basement/ workshop is to die for. I am green with envy.

    Cathy
    Wow Cathy, I'd love to see her sewing room! Laura why don't you post some photos for us?

    Randa, that is a very good idea about the pictures of the machines with their people! I have searched high and low just to find a photo of my mother treadling her mother's machine! Nothing, natta, no pictures anywhere! I would love to know what machine she treadled! My Dad bought Mom her first electric (Pfaff 130) machine just to keep her home! She'd go over to Gramma's house and use Gramma's treadle to make clothes for my brother and me. I will never know what treadle my Grandmother had - no photos of the machine anywhere!

    Joe, hopefully someone will want to preserve the old machines we all have invested our time, money, and love into!

    Nancy

  8. #38568
    Super Member vintagemotif's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sew wishful View Post
    I'm not "dis'n'" anyone....just thinking life has worse things to offer than this....my sister has lung cancer, my coworker's brother has throat cancer, my brother has an undiagnosed incapacitating pain in his legs and feet, my husband suffered a pituitary tumor, on and on and on! And still life goes on. Forgive and forget. Ignore and move on. LOL!


    WOW! Randa sorry to hear that you know so many folks that are not well. Prayers go out to each of them and a prayer for you too.
    Last edited by vintagemotif; 10-15-2012 at 03:28 PM.

  9. #38569
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    Name:  Debbie's Repro HC.jpg
Views: 181
Size:  199.5 KBOk this is just sad. My girl friend called me so excited. She'd found a Singer sphinx at an auction. It had been auctioned off before she had a chance to view the machine. She talked an "antique" dealer who had just paid $50 for the machine to sell it to her for $90. She thought it was so pretty that she was willing to give him the $40 extra. Well, she sent me a photo! Geeze, I didn't know if I should just keep my mouth shut about what she had, or tell her the truth? Anyway, I decided to tell her that she didn't have a vintage HC at all, but a modern reproduction of the original Singer model 15 with a Sphinx decal - probably made in either Taiwan or China. What do you guys think? Do you think I should not have burst her bubble?

    Nancy
    Last edited by BoJangles; 10-15-2012 at 03:32 PM.

  10. #38570
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoJangles View Post
    Ok this is just sad. My girl friend called me so excited. She'd found a Singer sphinx at an auction. It had been auctioned off before she had a chance to view the machine. She talked an "antique" dealer who had just paid $50 for the machine to sell it to her for $90. She thought it was so pretty that she was willing to give him the $40 extra. Well, she sent me a photo! Geeze, I didn't know if I should just keep my mouth shut about what she had, or tell her the truth? Anyway, I decided to tell her that she didn't have a vintage HC at all, but a modern reproduction of the original Singer model 15 with a Sphinx decal - probably made in either Taiwan or China. What do you guys think? Do you think I should not have burst her bubble?Attachment 370098

    Nancy
    You are in a no win - if you tell her she is going to be mad at herself and maybe you... If you don't tell her and she finds out she is going to be mad at you for not telling her...

    Had to help put an alternator in our son's car this afternoon - got nothing done today... bummer.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

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