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Thread: Vintage Singer

  1. #1
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    Vintage Singer

    Went to a antique/garage sale at the fairgrounds today & came home with this Singer. The serial number is G4818430. Can anyone tell me what model it is? Also can anyone tell me where to go for a bobbin case, needles, bobbins, etc.? The case base is pretty beat up but the hand wheel moves smooth & decals are in nice shape. What should I use to clean the machine? Thanks Tag on the machine said $75, tag on the case top said $50 & I paid $25. Hopefully I don't have a door stop.
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  2. #2
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    Go to ISMACS. Just type it into google. There is a link there with a list of serial number ranges.

    I think yours is some type of class 15 made in 1916.

    That should tide you over until the experts check in.

  3. #3
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    According to the serial number, which was allocated July 25, 1916, it's a Singer 115. The 115 is the rotary-hook version of the much more common model 15, which has an oscillating hook. It was Singer's top-of-the-line machine. To confirm that it's the rotary (rather than the oscillating) hook, turn the handwheel toward you while observing the action in the bobbin area. If it moves in a continuous clockwise direction, it's a rotary hook; if it reverses direction (back-and-forth), it's an oscillating hook. Parts are a cinch to find. It takes a standard 15x1 needle and the nice, roomy class 15 bobbin. A quick look on the internet for "115 bobbin case" came up with many from reliable sources for under $10.

    The ornamentation is commonly called "Tiffany" decals, which I believe is not a Singer designation but rather a later, invented term. Beautiful. Start cleaning by using sewing machine oil and cotton balls. Go slowly and carefully. Decals this old can be fragile, and once you've ruined them they're gone. (I learned this the hard way.) If that's masking tape on the bed of the machine, sewing machine oil can remove that too. You'll probably have to let it sit for a day or two to soften. Go slowly. (It bears repeating.)

    If you treadle, or have wanted to learn to, this would be the machine for it.

    At $25, if this is a model 15, you got a very good deal. If it's a 115, you got a prize. Congratulations on a really nice find.
    Last edited by Manalto; 08-29-2015 at 10:06 PM.

  4. #4
    Super Member Rodney's Avatar
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    What Manalto said. Here's the link to ISMACS' database: http://ismacs.net/singer_sewing_mach...-database.html

    The area around the bobbin case is much smaller on the 115 than the 15. You should be able to find a manual at Singerco.com under resources. They have free downloads for most models. Your machine looks like it's in nice shape. Read the sticky on cleaning old machines and watch Muv's videos. Only use sewing machine oil or tri-flow synthetic oil. Harsh cleaners will damage your decals. If the machine doesn't want to turn, oil it and wait. The new oil will take some time but will soften any old dried oil that's gumming up the works.
    Nice get,
    Rodney
    "Neglect to oil the machine will shorten its life and cause you

    trouble and annoyance" Quote from Singer Model 99 Manual

  5. #5
    Senior Member Sunflowerzz's Avatar
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    What a find! Color me green.....The decals are in great shape. Congratulations

  6. #6
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    For $25.00 it's a steal no matter.

  7. #7
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    I started to comment on this post last night, but canceled because I felt someone more experienced than I would respond soon. But..., how can I look at ISMACS and come up with a different answer than what I now see posted? I read it as G4818430, a class 15, 50,000 allocated June 1910. Now, after reading the other posts, the number is farther down the list as a Class 115, 10,000 allocated July 25, 1916. Is there a secret to reading that list of serial numbers?

  8. #8
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    I asked my friend Google what is the difference between a vintage Singer 15 sewing machine and a Singer 115. Friend Google immediately took me to pictures of the 115 with diagrams of stitching, and a link to the free manual. I'm still confused on deciphering the serial numbers.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by elnan View Post
    I started to comment on this post last night, but canceled because I felt someone more experienced than I would respond soon. But..., how can I look at ISMACS and come up with a different answer than what I now see posted? I read it as G4818430, a class 15, 50,000 allocated June 1910. Now, after reading the other posts, the number is farther down the list as a Class 115, 10,000 allocated July 25, 1916. Is there a secret to reading that list of serial numbers?
    Count the number of digits in the serial number. Singer made millions of machines, so there's a six-digit G481XXX in 1910; six years later, the G series was up to a seven-digit number, G481XXXX. It's an easy mistake to make.

  10. #10
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    Thank you for all of the info! It is the rotary hook. It does make a slight noise as the needle rises. Will try it again without a needle in the daylight & see what happens then. Except for that little noise it moves very smooth. Thank you again.

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