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Thread: Childhood Memories Please!!

  1. #26
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    Thanks for sharing Pollytink - loved your story - thanks. You could write a book and warm everyone's hearts. \
    Quote Originally Posted by germanquilter View Post
    Pollytink, you really should! Your story was very vivid and I could tell how much you were loved and how much you loved in return

  2. #27
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
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    This is now one of my favorite threads!
    Bernina 640, Singer 201-3, Singer Centennial 15-91, Tin Lizzie 26" long arm

  3. #28
    Super Member nygal's Avatar
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    I had ten cousins all in one family that lived across the street from me so I always had plenty of kids to play with in addition to other neighborhood friends.

    I use to love to play hop scotch in my back yard, roller skate the kind with the key! I played Jax, rode my bike and I loved playing with paper dolls we called them "cut outs" back then plus Yo Yo's the kind with the string! We had to amuse yourselves. No computers back then!!
    When it seems like the world is falling to pieces remember that the pieces are falling into place. We are nearing closer to the End Times.

  4. #29
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    I have 4 brothers and we were inseparable growing up. Our front yard was Lake Erie.We fished all year and my brothers took turns putting the worm on my hook. We had one bike to share.We ice skated and jumped iceburgs. We had bonfires almost every night of the year. Mom raised us by herself. We didn't have much materialistic stuff but we were spoiled with a lot of love and quality time with her and each other. Mom's gone now along with my oldest brother but the rest of us are still inseparable and we still go fishing as often as we can and I can put the worm on all by myself now : ) They are so proud of me lol - I will always know we had the best childhoods because of Mom's brand of spoiling

  5. #30
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    How fun is this!

    I grew up in Louisville Kentucky. We didn't have a lot, but a whole lot of love from a large family. In the summer we would catch mason jars full of lightning bugs, make mud pies that my grandpa always sampled and go to play in the flooded street after a typical horrific afternoon summer storm that built up after a steamy humid day. Dad always had a huge garden and mom canned or froze everything. Because summers are so hot and we didn't have air conditioning a lot of the cooking for canning was done outside over an open fire. Me and my two sisters had to help, my favorites were pinching the skins off of the beets after they were blanched and dumped into a big wash tub of cool water from the garden hose and eating the salted cabbage we sliced up to be jarred for sour kraut. I spent a lot of my summer weeks at my Grandmother's farm in Elizabeth Town. My cousins and I had to rise early to get the cows in for milking that started at 6, shuck corn to feed the chickens, gather and clean eggs and help hoe the corn fields - that was well before they soaked corn seeds in round up! Often we would escape the summer heat by swinging on a wild grape vine and jumping into the creek down the hill. We had to take turns because someone always had to sit on the bank and sound a warning when a water moccasin or blue racer came floating down the creek. What a wonderful storybook childhood!

  6. #31
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    Those were the good o'l days.... where did they go? I remember in the summer at the park, which was only 4 blocks away from where I lived they had craft days, we would make crafts, and everyone would bring a can of some sort of vegetable and we would make mulligan stew over the open fire.... in a big black pot. It was the best ever! I went swimming everyday at the local pool which was also only 2 blocks away from where I lived, and in the winter (at the park they would flood the tennis court) and I would ice skate all winter, there was a warming house there so you could spend the whole afternoon there.... then playing outside till the street lights came on, we played ball in the road ( it was a dead end street) all the neighbor hood kids played and we had so much fun.... I miss those days for my grandchildren...
    llweezie

  7. #32
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    Did you notice how much time we spent outside compared to kids now a days?

  8. #33
    Super Member pollyjvan9's Avatar
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    I am in my 70's and am amazed at the fact that we all share so many memories. This is one I haven't read about yet. I have one brother 15 mos younger, 1 uncle 6 mos younger, 1 uncle 2 yrs older, 1 uncle 4 yrs older and so forth. My mom was the second oldest of 12 children. My brother and I spent summers on my grandparents farm and most weekends. I was usually the only girl in the group and we all loved playing cowboys and indians in the woods, which was about a three block walk across a field. A creek ran through these wood with a swinging bridge over it at one point. The creek banks were steep and there were many "grape" vines hanging from the trees. We played Tarzan a lot (as the only girl I always had to be Jane!) and would swing from those vines across the creek or from tree to tree. I really don't know why there was never a broken bone, but there wasn't. Many memories of those long hot summers, homemade ice cream, finding wildflowers with my grandmother, horseback riding, gathering eggs with my grandma, riding on the plow with my grandpa. I wish my grandkids had such wonderful memories.

  9. #34
    Super Member pollyjvan9's Avatar
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    Donnajean, yes, I noticed. We always had really wild card games when the weather was too bad to go outside, but it had to over 100 deg or below 0 deg before we would stay indoors all day!

  10. #35
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    I love your story

  11. #36
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    I was a lucky little girl..I am the youngest child in my family of 5 kids...and the only girl. So I got lots of attention from my entire family. But besides that, we kinda lived in two different worlds. We were being raised in Milwaukee, but during the summers we spent all our weekends and several weeks in a very small country town of 800 people up north. So we grew up with all the newer fancy things in life (swimming pools, rec centers, neighborhood clubs, zoo's, bus rides, fast foods and etc..) then when we came up north, we got the walking in a field, swimming in an open lake, river, camping, sleeping under the stars, wild blue berry picking, raspberries etc.. gardens, bear watching, little country stores, wildflower picking, snakes, woodticks, fire flies, cookouts, huge family gatherings, and church ones, etc... when we lived in Milw we did some of the items Lynnie did... oh the trouble we caused. Dropped water balloons on people from above the A n P grocery store roof, picked tulips from a guys garden to give to our mom on our way home from neighborhood club, climb up a garage and slide accross the huge black pipes connecting one building to another... two stories up, I was 4 years old and went ice skating with my older brothers accross the street, and I couldn't skate, so I got upset and wanted to go home, so I just left and never told my brothers.. they couldn't see me, because I was crawling on all fours accross a 4 lane road in Milw... my mother happen to look out and saw me... oops... lol Then a girlfriend and I decided to take a ride with a stranger and he took us from one side of Milw and dropped us off way on the other side... oh my mom made sure I knew I did wrong... oh did she... lol Then we made the official complete move up north..and at first I didn't like the move, because it seemed like we had less to do here. Until I started school 3 weeks later and became friends with a gal...and we came up with our own fun.. we would ride bike 10 miles into town to go to the Sunday movies, Dairy Queen or Parades... then we would ride bikes to go swimming, fishing for trout, row a boat in the ditch by her house in the spring... yup we were geeks lol... ride our bikes under the irragation system in the summer to cool off. Go behind the harvester to pick up taters, pick dandelions for wine making, (her mom) learned how to officially polka, polish foods, use to play in their clothes shoot, run down stairs and pile all the dirty clothes in one spot and then climb into the shoot and drop down.. lol
    Faye

  12. #37
    Super Member mandyrose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by missmay View Post
    I grew up in the 1940's in Brooklyn, a part of New York City which at that time had at least 3 million people in it. We tended to stay in our neighborhood and play on our street, Patsy (hotscotch), rope jumping, marbles. Sometimes the man delivering ice would chip off a piece or two for us to share. I'm the oldest of 7 children so I spent a lot of time babysitting my younger brothers and sisters and keeping them amused. Sometimes I had to hang out the laundry so I strung a little line for them to hang small items like socks and dishtowels to dry. Summertime meant card games on the front stoop of whoever had a deck of cards, playing baseball with a spaulding ball and a cut off broom stick for our bat. When it got very hot we would go to local playground that had a shallow kiddie pool with sprays and later we would dry off on the swings. On our street the older boys would turn on the jonny pump (fire hydrant) and put a barrel over it to create a spray so all the kids could cool off. Hide and Seek after dinner, one time I hid so well that no one found me so they all went home to bed while I kept hiding. I remember playing Monolopy a lot but we never finished a game mainly because the younger kids would get bored with the game. Every once in awhile we would take the bus to the municipal swimming pool and spend the day there. We kids spent may days exploring the Prospect Park, creating secret paths through the bushes and trees, crossing over little streams and laying in the grass watching the clouds. I don't think our parents ever worried that someone would harm us as the park is huge and some days we walked for miles. Very few of us had bikes but they could be rented for rides in the park. As soon as we went back to school in Sept. out came our roller skates. There weren't many cars in those days so we skated in the street. After dinner on Sundays we would go to the movies, double feature with cartoons, newsrell and serial chapters. Some summer Sundays our parents would fill up the car with kids and lunch and we'd all go to Coney Island beach.
    Gee it's been fun remembering some of the things we did all those many years ago. Not a single electronic item involved, LOL!
    missmay your story reminds me of one of my favorite movies a tree grows in brooklyn oh i cannot think of all the actors in it but love the movie

  13. #38
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    My best memory is comimg home from school and seeing Mother quilting on her quilt hanging from the ceiling. Getting to see how much she had accomplised that day. We would pile our coats and books on the quilt and she would roll it up for the night. It hung over her bed. Then looking at it from the bottom. That to my Mother was the pretty part.

  14. #39
    Senior Member mythreesuns's Avatar
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    Now another memory.... my grandfather worked for the county highway department. He lived 21 miles from where the shop was, so they stored all the plow trucks etc at his farm and they even put in a underground fuel tank for his work vehicles. We knew right from the start, we could NEVER enter the shop where some was stored, nor ever touch his work items... so they never had issues with that. I remember coming to stay for a week or so at a time, and us kids would wait for grandpa to get home from work, and we would race down to see who would make it first to turn the handle to fill his fuel tank...or get his lunch box to get at his left over food to eat.. he always had left overs..now we know why he did...back then we didn't.. lol and sometimes we could go to work with him..that was a treat in its self..oh those were my special memories. One time we went to drop off his co-worker who had a farm, and he had baby kitties and I wanted one. So my grandpa made me call my mom at his house to ask if I could have one, and she said yes... I brought all four home, cuz I couldn't decide what one I liked best.. lololol I remember sitting on his lap steering the grader in the dump parking lot.. Now days no way can you take anyone with ya to work for the highway department. My dad was a contractor...owned his own business so we grew up with that also on a daily basis.

    My fondest memory of all time... was my grandfather, mother and I building our log house together. From cutting down the balsam trees, to peeling the bark to drying them...to building the entire 42 x 36 foot two story house. My dad did the cement work..basement and all three fire places.. but then he had to keep working to keep money coming in for the new house we were building, my older brothers all had jobs..so it was down to us three..grandma cooked all the meals for us. I sure learned tons those three summers it took us... the worse part was peeling the bark off...sooooo sticky and yukky.... and her house is 100% old style log house...even using wood dowls, no spikes (nails) including my grandpa even made all the windows him self, we started in 1973 and moved in 1976. So I was 11 when we started, and I was using chainsaws, hatchets and etc... would I have allowed my kids...NOOOOOOOOO lolol.
    Faye

  15. #40
    Super Member fireworkslover's Avatar
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    I grew up in a neighborhood that was a circle, so mainly played with the kids on my end. We played outside more than in, climbing trees, made tent houses, rode our bikes all over, had Kool-Aid stands in the summer. Sliding on the hills behind our house on the golf course, everyday in the winter. We even went sliding on the steep long grass covered hills in the summer on cardboard boxes. Was great fun. You hardly ever called friends to play, you went over to their house, rang the doorbell and asked in person.

  16. #41
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    I really think long ago childhood was more fun (and creative) than all the "stuff" children need today. We lived out-of-town and my cousins were my playmates!

    Climbing up into the barn loft and jumping out was fun and scary. Making roads under the trees using rakes, brooms, and rocks was an absorbing task.

    Finding rocks dug up when a well was drilled was always exciting
    .
    Then there were hopscotch, marbles, throwing a pocket knife into a circle, and playing basketball by throwing the ball into a bushel basket attached to the garage.

    We also played "Eeny-ivy-over," Prisoner's Base, Roller Bat, Bum-Bum-Bum, Slinging Statues, Freeze Tag, Hide and Go Seek,etc.

    Bored? Never! There were also paper dolls, books, making doll clothes, etc.
    Bebe McGee

  17. #42
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    Memories! Many of you have similar childhood experiences to mine. Growing up in a tiny rural town had its charm, and problems. My Grandpa ran the General Store and if I would put a candy bar on the counter he would smile and say "Yah" and I didn't have to pay. When he retired the new owner was a very mean and spiteful man so I never went near his store. Our one room school meant about a mile walk and quicker if we cut through the field, but not when the bull was nearby. Girls were not prized and men who fathered only girls were not esteemed. Girls were told to keep quiet, never do better in school than the boys, and never have "high falutin" ideas. Our minister was against girls having any higher education of college or training. So of course I couldn't wait to leave and see the rest of the world! I remember 4-H county fair competitions, Sunday School recitations, canning fruits and veggies on the hot summer days, cutting corn out of the beans, feeding the stock, hunting eggs, finding kittens in the barn loft, choosing fabric feed sacks for dresses, planting, weeding and harvesting from a big garden. For games we jumped rope, ran races, climbed trees, made dolls from hollyhock flowers, made mud pies, and in winter skated on the farm ponds. We didn't have skates just slid around with our boots. Keeping the wood box filled, and dusting were two chores I didn't like. But ironing and cooking I did like. Of course we had a bully. He lived at the end of the one road through town and caused all kinds of problems. Luckily we had Grandparents nearby to help. When our little school closed and we had to ride the bus over an hour each way to high school in the big town we were overwhelmed. But just at first. Most of us adapted well and some went on to college. I remember playing "Annie, Annie Over", "Mother May I", "Freeze Tag", "Hide and Seek", and boys played softball. Roads were graded and oiled each summer, dusty and stinky! In winter Dad wore ice creepers on his boots. Power would go out often and everyone had wood stoves and fireplaces to keep warm and cook. Our phone was a party line and everyone listed in. One woman had her phone next to her ticking clock so we always knew when she was there. Our minister told us he would not let Santa Clause come to our house if we messed up our Christmas speech, so we really knew it! Think I wrote before how he substituted raw colored eggs for boiled ones in our Easter egg hunt and they broke all over our new clothes. He thought it was funny, we didn't. Our school had 22 kids in grades 1-8. My class was the biggest ever with 5. I was the only girl. We had very few girls in the county. The first graders sat next to the eighth graders (both of them) and they helped us learn to read and write. Anyone else remember Dick, Jane, Puff and Spot? Some years we didn't have some grades as no child was that age. The bully I mentioned was held back twice until he got bigger. We had outhouses and a tornado shelter dug out underground with a concrete top.
    We used our ink wells to put spring flowers in and had box socials at school where people prepared pies and other treats packed in a box and it was auctioned off to raise money for the school. Some boxes were marked by girls hoping their boyfriends would buy them. The school had a stove in the middle for heat, cloak rooms, water bucket, stage and desks bolted to the floor with seats that folded up. I learned to sew on Grandmas treadle machine and still have it and it still works. I know I'm rambling but thought just keep popping into my head. When we tell kids today what our life was like they think it was "Little House on the Prairie" and it almost was!

  18. #43
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
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    Ao many of us played outdoors until the streetlights came on. Rode bikes and roller skated a lot. I wish there was a way to get today's youth off the computers and video games and learn to really play. Do you remember ever being bored?

  19. #44
    Power Poster Rhonda's Avatar
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    Wonderful memories everyone!! Thank you for posting your memories! This is always a fun thread to post!
    I hope to see more posts so keep adding stories as you remember them!!

  20. #45
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    Many memories in the country but this one always comes to mind first.
    One day I went berry picking with my grandma. As we were picking she says "stop,don't move" so of course I listened. I watched as she reached down then all of a sudden her hand came up and she flung a snake through the air across the field. I was amazed at what she did. Once that snake was gone we went right back to picking berries as if nothing happened. So glad she reminded me to use the bathroom before we left. Sure my pants would not have been dry lol.

  21. #46
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    Wearing my new silver high heels (with my green socks) to the nursery at the military base in California. Mama was going to the commissary and they didn't allow children, so my sister and I had to stay at the nursery. I remember a lady in the parking lot pointing and laughing - I must have been a sight! Was 6 years old that year. I still remember those high heels. They were BEAUTIFUL!

  22. #47
    Junior Member Quilts rock's Avatar
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    I grew up in the country and we played outside all day and right back outside after supper. There were all the neighbourhood kids playing with you and we played games like " Red Rover" ( am I showing my age here?) and we also played hide and seek in the corn fields- I don't know how we ever found anyone, lol! We also used to have a lot of picnics which I think have gone by the wayside as well. Life was good!

  23. #48
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    I grew up in central Ohio in a town of 15,000 or so. There was a dense woods behind our house and a city park (softball fields, etc.) beyond it at the bottom of the hill. Between the woods and the park was a small stream over which we walked on rocks we relocated every summer. Wish I had that kind of balance now!

    The creek -- a "run" in the local parlance -- was full of crayfish. We used to play with them, dare each other to touch one, etc. If you had told us then that people in Louisiana ate those things and that someday they would be among my favorite foods, we would have thought you were crazy. Do kids still have that much fun today? We didn't have TV so there was litle keeping us in the house, but with all the electronics every kid seems to have today, do they still explore the natural world that surrounds them?
    "Accomplishment is a consequence of effort" -- Michael Crichton

  24. #49
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    I just thought of another wonderful memory and had to share it. My youngest brother, just five years younger than me with two other kids inbetween, got into coin collecting. We all helped him look at the dates and mint marks on pennies to complete his collection. On warm summer rainy days, he would bike to the bank and buy sacks of pennies. I'm sure they were heavy and I can't remember how he got them home -- he thought baskets on bikes were for sissies, so he must have just carried them.

    We would dump the bags full of pennies on a card table on the front porch and we would sit, with whatever neighborhood kids happened to be around, sifting through piles of pennies. The task was simple, so we talked, told stores, etc. It doesn't sound like much when I write it, but sitting there with friends on the dry porch with the rain pouring down just a foot or two away -- it just didn't get much better than that.
    "Accomplishment is a consequence of effort" -- Michael Crichton

  25. #50
    Super Member Pollytink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by germanquilter View Post
    Pollytink, you really should! Your story was very vivid and I could tell how much you were loved and how much you loved in return
    Yes, I should. We've had two deaths in my generation in March and it's has me thinking a lot about my own mortality. so have been thinking I should write down a bit of "history". What I need to do too, is to print out all of these posts because so many of them have reminded me of similar things in my own life. I really do feel sorry for today's kids tho, missing out on all the wonderful adventures we all had!!

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