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Thread: Does anybody know what kind of hoe this is?

  1. #1
    Super Member Favorite Fabrics's Avatar
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    Does anybody know what kind of hoe this is?

    It's an antique garden implement that came from my husband's uncle's farm here in upstate NY.

    And it's my absolute favorite hoe, because it chops so well. I've never seen anything like it. The blade is curved, with a thin edge (better for cutting), and it is angled with respect to the handle.

    And the handle is nearly gone. Pity. I use it anyway...

    Anybody have any ideas about this hoe?
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  2. #2
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    Very nice hoe and definitely worth saving! You should be able to replace the handle, as farm tools were made to last a lonnnnnng time.
    Neesie


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  3. #3
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    Go to a hardware store that does/makes repairs - and you can get a new handle for it.

    It just looks like an ordinary hoe that got worn down with sharpening and use into that curved shape.

  4. #4
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    I think it is for getting those weeds out real good. joyce j

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    Farmers used it for getting weeds out of rows in a field. I believe it is called a "row hoe" Probably can get a new handle from the hardware store.
    Valerie

  6. #6
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Just looks like an old hoe to me.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  7. #7
    Super Member Nanamoms's Avatar
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    Looks like the ones my daddy used (and made me use) to hoe the weeds out of the garden (which was really a field of loonnnnggg rows)!!

  8. #8
    Senior Member Pat M.'s Avatar
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    Grandfather had a wheel grinding stone and some of his garden tools looked like that.

  9. #9
    Super Member OKLAHOMA PEACH's Avatar
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    Looks like a old hoe to me, they used to be shaped different than they are today. Probably easier to use with cutting edges on bottom and sides.

  10. #10
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    I don't know anything about vintage tools, but it looks hand forged. They don't make them like that any more!

  11. #11
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    LOOKS LIKE an old hoe and obviously one well used

  12. #12
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    It just looks like a hoe to me...(?) new handles are easy to attach.

  13. #13
    Super Member Yooper32's Avatar
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    Could very well have been a hand-forged tool and it has been used a lot. The reason I think it is hand-forged is the way it attatches to the handle.
    Yooper32 aka: Donna B

  14. #14
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    It is similar to an antique garden hoe that a friend's grandfather made. It was not as deep as ours today but wider to hit more weeds at a stroke. Hang on to it!

  15. #15
    Super Member KyKaren1949's Avatar
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    I agree with those above who said it's worn down from sharpening. My husband's family lives on a farm that raises tobacco. Tobacco has to be kept hoed while it grows. All of their hoes have been sharpened multiple times and look kind of like this one.
    Karen in Kentucky

  16. #16
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    Daddy always called them a goose necked hoe. The one you have is just worn down from sharpening.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Ccorazone's Avatar
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    I thought it looked like the type of hoe used for mixing cement but they have two big holes in them.

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  18. #18
    Super Member Grace MooreLinker's Avatar
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    Looks like a thinning hoe (chopping hoe) to me, that is for taking out extra plants or weed , they were used when farming was all done by hand. Thinning/chopping was for corn, cotton and some other crops that needed spaced plants.
    Last edited by Grace MooreLinker; 06-13-2012 at 04:16 PM.
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  19. #19
    Super Member wvdek's Avatar
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    This is a site you may like - http://www.maydreamsgardens.com/p/my...ollection.html
    All kinds of hoes there.
    Should not be a problem to put a new handle on. I would make sure I put an Ash wood or fiberglass handle on that baby. She still has a lot of good yearsl left in her.

  20. #20
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
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    A lot of garden implements were customised by keen growers. Looks like a beauty. Replace the handle and you will get years more use out of it. Love pieces like this....well worth preserving and using.

  21. #21
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    Probably one of the best hoes you will ever own. I have an old hoe....about the same type. It sharpens great and I love to use it to get under plants. My hoe came from my grandfather and it was real old then.

  22. #22
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    It looks like a row hoe, we had one when we raised tobacco.These can be made to look this way by using a grinding wheel,or the old way with lots of use.They are thin and sometimes hand made. These are great for hoeing out weeds around corn and tobacco. We planted corn in 2 or 3 grains together then skipped 6 to 8 inches ,which made getting weed away from the the good plants easier without cuting any plants down with the sharp edges of a regular. You can replace the handle easy.Very nice hoe

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