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Thread: dry clean or home wash a comforter...

  1. #1
    Junior Member Sandynorm's Avatar
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    my boyfriend is always cold, and thinks that you have to have a comforter to be warm. I was brought up with quilts. I was redoing the bedroom in a beach theme and he thought it would be nice to "Buy" a comforter, but to compromise, he got the seashells since I was doing a blue and white beach theme. This comforter is dry clean only, it is a heavy weight cottom cover, not down, not velour or rayon... I am thinking of putting it in my oversize front loader wahsing machine??? I do not want to ruin it, but I do not like dry cleaning AND all the chemicals that they use. Would any of you put it in the washer????

  2. #2
    Senior Member Boopers's Avatar
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    NO! DC only. Talk to your dry cleaner and tell them that you don't want chemicals used. They may have a more natural method to clean it. I tried to machine wash a dc only bed cover and it came out in shreds.

  3. #3
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    What is the inside made out of, do you know??
    I wash just about everything.

  4. #4
    Super Member sewwhat85's Avatar
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    why not take a peek inside. rip a seam open and look???

  5. #5
    Super Member Greenheron's Avatar
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    Whatever cleaning method you use, when it is clean make a removable cover for it (like a giant envelope with ties or buttons on the end. You could even piece one side of the cover. With care only the cover will be soiled and easily washed. My mother had a satin comforter for over 50 years and the removable cover kept it clean and unworn.

  6. #6
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    After dry cleaning, hang it outside or under cover so the wind and fresh air can remove any lingering dry cleaning smells. This should be done with everything that is dry cleaned.

    Then do as these clever forum writers have suggested and make a cover for it. You could sew or tack the 4 corners so it will always be in line, and easy to remove for cleaning. And I'll bet that after some time, maybe years, your tastes will change and this way you can make new covers to match any new bedrooms.

  7. #7
    Super Member JulieR's Avatar
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    I usually throw everything in the wash, too, but instead of either washing it or DC you might just spot-clean any stains and lay it out on the lawn in the sunshine. Sunlight kills all kinds of bad things, including any odors.

  8. #8
    Super Member BrendaY's Avatar
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    Well... I would wash it... if it falls apart, then use a nice quilt that you made already..

  9. #9
    Super Member sewmuchmore's Avatar
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    I have wash many things that say DC only, If you decide to use cold water and woolite. Line dry. I hate how much they charge to DC and the smell.

  10. #10
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    If you wash it it will be lumpy. My daughter did that to mine and she even took it out so that the machine was large enough to hold it. A 150 comforter in the trash; can't fix the lumps

  11. #11
    Super Member michelehuston's Avatar
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    if it says dry clean only..that is the best bet!

  12. #12
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by romanojg
    If you wash it it will be lumpy. My daughter did that to mine and she even took it out so that the machine was large enough to hold it. A 150 comforter in the trash; can't fix the lumps
    Most likely the lumpiness was caused by machine agitation. Polyester batting that isn't needle-punched or treated with bonding agents can't take machine agitation. (Top loaders are hard on all kinds of quilts.) Most likely many of the commercial comforters have this kind of batting.

    I think I would still take a chance and wash/dry myself rather than dry cleaning. However, I would use a top-loading washing machine and do all the agitation by hand. The method requires filling the machine with soap and water, turning the machine off, adding the comforter, hand agitating by pushing down on the quilt, turning the machine to "spin", adding rinse water, turning off the machine, hand agitating, turning the machine to "spin", etc. The idea is to skip all the machine agitation cycles of the machine. Spinning is not hard on a comforter the way that machine agitation is.

    With a commercial comforter, I would not trust even the milder agitation of a front-loading machine; if the batting is polyester without needle-punching or bonding agents, I would be afraid that even that much agitation would cause the batting to lump.

    It's probably a good idea to search the comforter for a "contents" tag. If there's a lot of rayon in the comforter's fabric, that might be another problem for washing because rayon can shrink a *lot*. I would not be as concerned about primarily cotton fabric shrinking. The biggest problem is the batting, I think.

  13. #13
    Super Member TonnieLoree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenheron
    Whatever cleaning method you use, when it is clean make a removable cover for it (like a giant envelope with ties or buttons on the end. You could even piece one side of the cover. With care only the cover will be soiled and easily washed. My mother had a satin comforter for over 50 years and the removable cover kept it clean and unworn.
    That is called a Duvet Cover.

  14. #14
    Junior Member Sandynorm's Avatar
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    Thank you all for the ideas. I love the idea of a cover, but he specifically picked this one out for the seashells as I am crazy about the beach. I like the idea of spot cleaning it, it is mostly the top edge, and then putting it out in the sunshine, for starters anyway.

  15. #15
    Junior Member Sandynorm's Avatar
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    I also do not see any fiber content label, just dry clean only. The outside is cotton, feels like it could be 100%, there is not much quilting which does concern me.

  16. #16
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    If it doesn't need to be cleaned right away, you could be looking for fabric to make a cover, and have your BF help you look and find one he likes. Then get the cover made, and clean it just before putting the new cover on!

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