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Thread: Flimsy Paper Clothes Sewing Pattern Question

  1. #26
    Senior Member kellen46's Avatar
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    durable pattern paper that is practically free

    Here is an old trick I have been using for years. To make a durable pattern paper do this. You will need some white tissue, and some white garbage bags. Go cheap...dollar store cheap for these. cut open the garbage bag so you can use a single layer. Sandwich the plastic between two pieces of tissue paper. Fuse with a hot iron. Be careful not to get any exposed plastic on your iron. If pieces are too small they can be taped together when cooled. I have used them to trace sewing patterns from books, or off of tissue patterns. I have used them to trace quilting pattern and then sewn, sans thread, over the line to make a pounce pattern for my blocks. I have used this technique to strengthen flimsy tissue patterns, just substitute tissue pattern for one side of the tissue/plastic sandwich. I have also used this concept to make some fancy papers very strong, Bonded to map paper to make lampshades, bonded to holographic tissue to make journal covers, really anything that can go under a hot iron. Also I have bonded fabric to tissue to make book cloth...a cloth that is impervious to the moisture of glue when covering book boards to use in book binding. Book cloth is very expensive and limited in color and design. If you make your own you can use any fabric. Book cloth is also good for covering boxes. This is only the things I have come up with so far, I am sure there are lots more uses I have not thought of. What else can all of you come up with. I have an old thrift shop iron I use for this so if I get some plastic on it I can scrape it off later without fear of damage, oh and use a dry iron for this. Another related tip for book binders and box coverers, the cardboard on the back of paper tablets is just as good as commercially bought book board, and it is free, well sort of.
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  2. #27
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JENNR8R View Post
    I wonder if I can trace the pattern onto the back of freezer paper and then iron the freezer paper onto the fabric?
    Absolutely! This is what I do, and I love it because it's easier to cut out. No pinning. I have one freezer paper pattern I've used 12 times.

  3. #28
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    J1) if I bought the pattern at a place where they go on sale every so often, I would buy another pattern.If I needed two sizes of it. (I am willing to spend four dollars for two patterns - but unwilling to spend forty dollars for two patterns.

    2) if you want to trace the original pattern and keep it intact,

    one can buy pattern tracing material - it is usually found with the interfacings
    one can also use parchment paper - found on rolls - it is used to line baking pans - somewhere in many grocery stores
    One can also buy vellum on rolls - it is found with drafting supplies

    3) that flimsy tissue paper is surprisingly tough and can be used more than once.

    4) I usually repackage my used patterns in a larger ziplock bag. I can usually refold it to fit the original envelope, but it is a battle.


    Breathe. Take your measurements. Pattern sizes and ready -to- wear sizes may differ. Match your measurements the the size on the pattern envelope!

    For a starter project - select something forgiving as to fit and construction.
    I would like to add that whether you buy or trace several copies on paper or some such, if you iron light weight iinterfacing to the back, they wear like iron, and can be used many times. I do this with any pattern I want to keep for future endeavors.
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  4. #29
    Super Member Marysewfun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mermaid View Post
    I preserve my 'flimsy' paper patterns by ironing them onto lightweight interfacing. Works wonderfully and folds neatly to place back into the envelope. You can see all the markings thru the interfacing. You can usually buy about 3 yds in a package at the fabric store for $1. At least that's what I pd last time (might have been on sale)...then trace the size you want to save before cutting away.
    This is what I do also, only I iron the interfacing to the back of the pattern so the the pattern is still clearly visible and then trace on a tissue or paper for the size of pattern I need at the time and fold everything all back up and keep it in a plastic bag.

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  5. #30
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by selm View Post
    To use the pattern twice. Make the larger size first, then you can cut down to the other size. And, as was mentioned match size to person's measurements allowing extra for "ease". You could also cut one out of muslin to see how it fits before you cut the good fabric.
    Caution: this might not work because the curves will often cross from one size to the next. Your best bet is to trace it out on cheap but sturdy sew-in type interfacing. It will be much easier to work with and every size can be used. I learned this at a home party for Stretch and Sew in the 1970's and have used that technique many times for patterns that I wanted to use more than once, such as kid's pull-on shorts as they grew through the years. Be sure to trace the markings that indicate grain and the dots that have to match. Use a Sharpie or some such that is permanent and won't smear on your fabric.

    I almost forgot to mention that it's important to iron (no steam, low setting) both the interfacing and the tissue pattern before you begin to trace. Best wishes!
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  6. #31
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    It has Been many years but if I want the smaller size I would fold under the extra paper at the cutting line and then cut out my fabric. Simply unfold when finished

  7. #32
    Super Member meanmom's Avatar
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    Since the patterns are so flimsy, I often trace the size I want onto tissue paper. The kind you use when wrapping gifts. I get it from the Dollar Store so it is really cheap. It isn't any flimsier than what the pattern is printed on.

  8. #33
    Power Poster solstice3's Avatar
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    I trace the smaller size or gently fold

  9. #34
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Angellight;7144838]I also do this, and if it is a curved area, I cut into the smallest line in several areas so that I can cut the pattern out with out cutting slices out of the pattern. I then iron the crisp line in to the size I need. When I need to make the larger size, I "un-fold" to the size I need and re- iron.

    Good luck and happy sewing.

    This is the way I've always done it. In fact my top is smaller than my bottom so I usually use two sizes when cutting out clothes.
    TwandasMom

  10. #35
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    I fold on the lines wanted and get the rest of the paper folded into the main body and then unfold and you can use the different sizes. Like the idea of tracing unto light weight interfacing too.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by crafty pat View Post
    by turning the pattern back at the line I want to use
    I have done this. I just turn the paper back to the correct size line and pin it down onto the fabric. Yes, sometimes I snip a little of the pattern fold off, but it doesn't really matter too much. Next time I use the pattern, I fold to another line if needed.
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  12. #37
    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
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    I copy all my patterns to stuff called Pattern Ease. This way if I change size I haven't lost the pattern for good. Its strong enough that you can use it numerous times. I got it at JoAnne's and you should be able to find it where they keep their stabilizers and interfacings. I buy it by the bolt as I've used it for other things too. Made my own pattern for cushions to go on my porch swing, etc.
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  13. #38
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pocoellie View Post
    the paper that you get at the doctors office, you can get a whole roll for under $5
    Where do you get it?
    Never let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

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