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Thread: Hemming a Shirt with a Curved Bottom

  1. #1
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    Hemming a Shirt with a Curved Bottom

    This is something I have been struggling with. I really like that look when the hem curves up along the hip and then back down at the back. All I get is puckers. I have gotten special hemming feet. Tried very slow hand stitching. Tried all kinds of thread. This method, shared by Craftsy has me hopeful.

    http://www.craftsy.com/blog/2014/08/...ed-shirt-hems/

    It is worth checking out. It looks beautiful and it makes sense.

    Alice

  2. #2
    Super Member juneayerza's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting this.
    June

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    Looks very promising. I have had that seem issue previously. Thanks

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    Wish I had known that when I use to make my own shirts.

  5. #5
    Suz
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    This is how I make these hems. Say I want a 1/4" hem. Accurately stitch at 1/2" along the edge (one layer). Spritz lightly with starch and then fold the outer edge in half to meet the stitch line. Again carefully press easing in any fullness. The stitch line will keep the curved bias edge from stretching. The edge should lay flat with no "pointy things" to the o/s edge. Stitch carefully as you normally would. Press edge again. -- For a narrower hem, you could reduce the 1/2" to 3/8", press in half, then stitch.

    Let me hear how if this works for you. GOOD LUCK!!

  6. #6
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    thanks for sharing this tut... will have to remember this.
    Nancy in western NY
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  7. #7
    Super Member MaggieLou's Avatar
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    Great idea and it gives a really finished and polished look. thanks for posting.
    Margaret

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suz View Post
    This is how I make these hems. Say I want a 1/4" hem. Accurately stitch at 1/2" along the edge (one layer). Spritz lightly with starch and then fold the outer edge in half to meet the stitch line. Again carefully press easing in any fullness. The stitch line will keep the curved bias edge from stretching. The edge should lay flat with no "pointy things" to the o/s edge. Stitch carefully as you normally would. Press edge again. -- For a narrower hem, you could reduce the 1/2" to 3/8", press in half, then stitch.

    Let me hear how if this works for you. GOOD LUCK!!
    Thanks, I'll give it a try. It makes sense

  9. #9
    Senior Member ladydukes's Avatar
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    Hemming shirts with curve

    Another thing that works is to make a long running stitch and sort of "gather it up" when you double-fold it to make it ease in. Sew, remove basting.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Pat M.'s Avatar
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    I use my serger and then fold up the hem and sew with a sewing machine. Fast and very neat.

  11. #11
    Senior Member petpainter's Avatar
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    Thanks! I have made all my Dad's shirts with tails for the last 35 years. I will definitely try this method!

  12. #12
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    Elmer's glue to make the hem lie flat?

  13. #13
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    This was how I learned to hem every thing in Home Ec. class- we're talking back in the mid 60's

  14. #14
    Super Member annette1952's Avatar
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    Very nice. I'll have to remember this. I bookmarked it. Thanks for posting!

  15. #15
    Suz
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    Stay stitching 1/2"+/- along the curve is one I learned in junior high school (1950s). This method can be used for any curved edge of single layer fabrics, i.e., a round table cloth, a neckline. It also works well on sheer fabrics.

  16. #16
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    That's a great tip. I'm going to bookmark that one. You could also make your own bias tape and it would match even better.
    Patrice S

    Bernina Artista 180, Singer 301a, Featherweight Centennial, Rocketeer, Juki 2200 QVP Mini, White 1964 Featherweight

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