Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 3 4
Results 76 to 96 of 96

Thread: Learned something new today that helps stock the freezer

  1. #76
    Junior Member quiltnchik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    In my sewing studio - where else?
    Posts
    236
    Quote Originally Posted by peabee
    lots of good info here. rachelcb80, do you have a suggestion on websites to learn more about how our commercial meats are being processed? if we're going to continue to eat meat, i'd like to make better choices for my family.
    youtube has some videos, but be forewarned that they aren't for the faint of heart :(

  2. #77
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    242
    Congrats! I know what it's like to raise chicks from eggs. My children did this for science fairs. The one year daughter procrastinated until it was almost too late. But we made it. However, the morning of the science fair, the electricity went out and the incubator began to cool down. So we wrapped it in blankets and brought an electric blanket with us to school. You got it! The room began to 'tilt' with all the children grouping around my daughter's exhibit. These little babes decided to hatch then and there. It was exciting. After we were finished with the chicks, we gave them to a friend who had a hen house. My guess it was chicken dinner for them, but they didn't invite us for dinner. :)
    Oh, well, just wanted to contribute. You brought back some fun memories.

  3. #78
    Super Member SaraSewing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    AZ/Utah border
    Posts
    2,390
    Quote Originally Posted by Jingleberry
    I would only eat fruits and vegetables if I had to kill anything, watched my Mom wring chicken's neck when I was about 6, never left me. Made a bad impression.
    I'd be perfectly happy as a vegetarian, although I was raised on a farm, raising our own meat. Just give me cheese, nuts, fruits. Then the occasional steak. . . . Glad you enjoyed the chicken process, but it's EEEWWWWW for me to consider.

  4. #79
    Super Member Rachelcb80's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Raleigh, MS
    Posts
    1,057
    Quote Originally Posted by peabee
    lots of good info here. rachelcb80, do you have a suggestion on websites to learn more about how our commercial meats are being processed? if we're going to continue to eat meat, i'd like to make better choices for my family.
    I'm sure if you just google for info you'll come up with a bunch, but we all know you can't believe everything you see on the internet.

    My biggest eye opener was when we moved to where we live now. There's a lot of chicken farming in this area and we live down the street from a group of 4 chicken houses. To say it's made me ill to see how the birds are raised and treated is an understatement.

    A really good book that I found last year is called Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon. It's changed how I feed my family quite a bit. I would recommend it to everyone who is serious about changing the way the eat.

  5. #80
    Super Member greaterexp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    2,700
    Blog Entries
    1
    We raise our own poultry, too. The processing isn't my favorite part, but oh, my, they are wonderful! It does feel wonderful to take care of more of our food ourselves - and understand what it takes to put it there! We raise jumbo turkeys. Our largest turkey dressed out at 48-1/2 pounds. What a feast!

  6. #81
    Senior Member puck116's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    MA and FL
    Posts
    416
    Blog Entries
    2
    My dad was a country guy and my mom a city girl. We lived on 6 acres as a small girl and had a barn, fruit trees, a garden and raised a few animals. My dad had a regular job though. My mom canned fruits and veggies and every summer we had homemade root beer. I remember getting baby chicks for Easter, only to have to slaughter them later for food. It made me not squeemsh (sp) about bugs and things. I'm the designated animal parts picker upper that the cats bring in. I'm a suburbanite now.

  7. #82
    Super Member mollymct's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    MS
    Posts
    2,348
    [quote=Rachelcb80

    I used to feel that way until I saw first hand how food animals are raised and treated (we live near a bunch of chicken houses, 25,000 birds in one house crammed together, you can't breath because of the ammonia level). I feel like I'm doing my part to not support an industry that I'm strongly opposed to. That's also why I encourage DH to hunt and bring food to the table that way as well. Every little bit helps.[/quote]

    Living "in town" I am not able to do this, but I applaud you. I know it must've been a really difficult job. But how great to be self-sufficient and, as you said, to give the chickens a humane life while they are here!

  8. #83
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West Roxbury, Ma
    Posts
    10,362
    Oh that must feel so good. I enjoyed the pictures. Thanks

  9. #84
    Super Member greaterexp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    2,700
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Lostn51
    Rachel the Buff Rooster is gorgeous! I can see where he and I could be buddies until he copped an attitude. Then he would have a formal introduction to my SW .40! :P

    Too bad you cant freeze eggs, because 54 a week is one hell of an omelet! I bet the kids are like "Not eggs again......" :lol: kinda like a guy that grows a lot of corn. Its like how many ways can we fix all of this corn. Cornbread, Corn Whiskey, Corn Chowder, Corn Whiskey, Fried Corn, Corn Whiskey, Corn on the cob...........

    Okay since we are going back to the good old days I need to go plant some corn now and pull out the still.:mrgreen:

    Billy
    One CAN freeze eggs! Just google it, and you'll find some cool ways to do it!

  10. #85
    Super Member greaterexp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    2,700
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Candace
    Quote Originally Posted by Rachelcb80
    Quote Originally Posted by Candace
    I have Lucky(because my dog bit her as a chick and she lived) and Alice. Alice, I wouldn't have such a hard time culling. She's a brat. But, we pick them up to pet and play with. With meat birds on acreage, I'd be like you and not get close. Do you also collect their eggs? I'm assuming you only let a certain amount incubate or stay with the mothers? What breed of bird do you raise?
    I do collect their eggs. I have 8 Rhode Island Red hens that are my egg producers. They are great layers and don't hardly ever go broody (start setting a clutch of eggs and therefore quit laying). My rooster is a Buff Orpington. I wish now I would have got Buff Orpington hens as well, but I can always get some down the road. The chicks I just "harvested" were a cross between the two breeds. They were really nice, big bodied birds. I left my original 8 Rhode Island hens for now. I'm going to raise another batch out of them, then it'll be their turn to go. They're 2 years old now. Haven't decided if I'll replace them with their offspring, or if I'll go ahead and get some Orpington hens at that point.

    Broody and Broonella are annoying and I almost added them to the freezer batch yesterday, but something told me just to leave them. They are constanly broody and will fight you like crazy when you're trying to get the eggs. They're loud too. But they have character and don't take much feed to keep. :)
    My R.R. Alice likes to charge me when I walk around and will sometimes peck at my legs. So, I have to show her who's boss. She could go into the soup pot and I wouldn't cry. They're less than a year old but produce an egg every day! You're right they're not broody at all. I've got a Chickens for Dummies Book that highlights all the breeds. We picked R.R. because of the amount of eggs they produce. There are other breeds that grow bigger, quicker that are best for meat. I've never seen the B.O. here that you're talking about. I think we may add one or two more to the flock but we have a tad under 1/2 acre so we can't go crazy. I wish we weren't attached because when they get to be 10 years old and not producing, we're going to miss the eggs for sure!
    We've raised a lot of chickens, both for egg and meat. Those Cornish Cross are incredible for meat. We raised ours to dress out at around 8-9 pounds. That's a meal - and a half! It was wonderful to be able to donate 18 dozen chicken and duck eggs every week to our church's pantry. But feed gets awfully expensive.

  11. #86
    Super Member greaterexp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    2,700
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by quiltnchik
    Quote Originally Posted by JS
    If I raised any kind of animal I could not eventually kill it or eat it. Guess I would not make a good farmer.
    I'm one of the biggest animal lovers you could ever hope to meet, but I do understand the reason behind raising ones own food. I don't make pets of my "food;" I feed and water them, and they have a good life while here, but then they go in my freezer. Rabbit meat is just plain yummy (all white meat)!
    Trish, what breeds are those? We have started raising New Zealand Whites for meat, but haven't had any babies yet. I'm anxious to try the meat.

  12. #87
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outer Space
    Posts
    9,839
    Quote Originally Posted by greaterexp
    Quote Originally Posted by Candace
    Quote Originally Posted by Rachelcb80
    Quote Originally Posted by Candace
    I have Lucky(because my dog bit her as a chick and she lived) and Alice. Alice, I wouldn't have such a hard time culling. She's a brat. But, we pick them up to pet and play with. With meat birds on acreage, I'd be like you and not get close. Do you also collect their eggs? I'm assuming you only let a certain amount incubate or stay with the mothers? What breed of bird do you raise?
    I do collect their eggs. I have 8 Rhode Island Red hens that are my egg producers. They are great layers and don't hardly ever go broody (start setting a clutch of eggs and therefore quit laying). My rooster is a Buff Orpington. I wish now I would have got Buff Orpington hens as well, but I can always get some down the road. The chicks I just "harvested" were a cross between the two breeds. They were really nice, big bodied birds. I left my original 8 Rhode Island hens for now. I'm going to raise another batch out of them, then it'll be their turn to go. They're 2 years old now. Haven't decided if I'll replace them with their offspring, or if I'll go ahead and get some Orpington hens at that point.

    Broody and Broonella are annoying and I almost added them to the freezer batch yesterday, but something told me just to leave them. They are constanly broody and will fight you like crazy when you're trying to get the eggs. They're loud too. But they have character and don't take much feed to keep. :)
    My R.R. Alice likes to charge me when I walk around and will sometimes peck at my legs. So, I have to show her who's boss. She could go into the soup pot and I wouldn't cry. They're less than a year old but produce an egg every day! You're right they're not broody at all. I've got a Chickens for Dummies Book that highlights all the breeds. We picked R.R. because of the amount of eggs they produce. There are other breeds that grow bigger, quicker that are best for meat. I've never seen the B.O. here that you're talking about. I think we may add one or two more to the flock but we have a tad under 1/2 acre so we can't go crazy. I wish we weren't attached because when they get to be 10 years old and not producing, we're going to miss the eggs for sure!
    We've raised a lot of chickens, both for egg and meat. Those Cornish Cross are incredible for meat. We raised ours to dress out at around 8-9 pounds. That's a meal - and a half! It was wonderful to be able to donate 18 dozen chicken and duck eggs every week to our church's pantry. But feed gets awfully expensive.
    We don't have to feed our 2 girls that much since ours are free range. And we have an orchard so there is plenty of dropped fruit and bugs to satisfy them. Though they seem to favor my best landscape plants too:<

  13. #88
    Member QuiltingPinjinsa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    51
    Awsom! rasing your own chickens, drug free. Good job!

  14. #89
    Junior Member quiltnchik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    In my sewing studio - where else?
    Posts
    236
    Quote Originally Posted by greaterexp
    Trish, what breeds are those? We have started raising New Zealand Whites for meat, but haven't had any babies yet. I'm anxious to try the meat.
    They're NZ - some blues, some gray and some wild-color. The mother is a blue, and I have one of her daughters from the first litter that will be bred this weekend. Just make sure you process by 12 weeks for the best meat; otherwise they start getting tough and are harder to dress out. There's a Meat Rabbits group on Yahoo that you might be interested in :)

  15. #90
    Super Member Rachelcb80's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Raleigh, MS
    Posts
    1,057
    Quote Originally Posted by Candace

    We don't have to feed our 2 girls that much since ours are free range. And we have an orchard so there is plenty of dropped fruit and bugs to satisfy them. Though they seem to favor my best landscape plants too:<
    I would love so much to let my flock free range but they won't stay out in the pasture. We have 25 acres but they gotta be up in the flower beds, in the garage and the very few other areas that I don't want them in. They poop all over the driveway and that gets tracked in the house. It just didn't work.

  16. #91
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outer Space
    Posts
    9,839
    Yes I can't imagine what your flock would do. The two we have have ravaged our yard:< They have eaten quite a few landscape plants and cause a big mess. I have to hose down the patio often as that's their favorite poop spot:< But, they do make up for all the destruction by eating snails, bugs and spiders and sometimes even an occasional weed.

  17. #92
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Fork Ca
    Posts
    8,254
    I love them best too. I just can't eat one the same day as I have to butcher. Don't ask me why, but the smell stays on my hands or something and I just can't do it. But isn't it great to know how self sufficient we can be. I remember a Thanksgiving that absolutely EVERYTHING we put on the table we had grown ourselves except the sugar, and the coffee and seasonings. The kids still talk about it

  18. #93
    Super Member feline fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    8,999
    Quote Originally Posted by IBQUILTIN
    I love them best too. I just can't eat one the same day as I have to butcher. Don't ask me why, but the smell stays on my hands or something and I just can't do it. But isn't it great to know how self sufficient we can be. I remember a Thanksgiving that absolutely EVERYTHING we put on the table we had grown ourselves except the sugar, and the coffee and seasonings. The kids still talk about it
    I agree that smell stays with you, even after a shower. It is much better to let the butchered chicken sit at least 24 hours, they tend to be a bit chewy if eaten the same day you butcher them. Don't know why that is but they tender up if you let them sit in the fridge for 24 hours before freezing or cooking.

  19. #94
    Super Member Rachelcb80's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Raleigh, MS
    Posts
    1,057
    Quote Originally Posted by feline fanatic
    Quote Originally Posted by IBQUILTIN
    I love them best too. I just can't eat one the same day as I have to butcher. Don't ask me why, but the smell stays on my hands or something and I just can't do it. But isn't it great to know how self sufficient we can be. I remember a Thanksgiving that absolutely EVERYTHING we put on the table we had grown ourselves except the sugar, and the coffee and seasonings. The kids still talk about it
    I agree that smell stays with you, even after a shower. It is much better to let the butchered chicken sit at least 24 hours, they tend to be a bit chewy if eaten the same day you butcher them. Don't know why that is but they tender up if you let them sit in the fridge for 24 hours before freezing or cooking.
    I read about the fact that the smell may be bothersome, and I was worried because I have the most sensitive sense of smell EVER. But I didn't have any problem with the smell. In fact, I didn't smell anything other than the faint smell of wet feathers during the hot dunk.

    I'm not 100% sure but I think the reason the meat is chewy if you eat and/or freeze on the same day as butchering is because of rigormotis. If you let the meat rest 24 hours, enzymes and such break down the substance that causes the muscle to stay contracted.

  20. #95
    Super Member annette1952's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Harrison, MI
    Posts
    8,513
    Years ago when I was first married I got some free chicks for buying feed. We raised them & everytime we went out back by the chicks they would follow us around & they was so cute. When they grew up my husband killed & cleaned them but I could not help & I could not eat them either.
    I like chicken but not ones I raise from babies. I would never make it on a farm. LOL

  21. #96
    Senior Member Nancy Ingham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Shipshewana, IN
    Posts
    785
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Sadiemae
    That brings back childhood memories...
    For me too....Good for you! :D :D :thumbup:

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 3 4

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.