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Thread: rolled hem attachment

  1. #1
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    rolled hem attachment

    I am trying to hem some scarves made out of some very thin and filmy fabric with the rolled hem attachment to my sewing machine. Does anyone have any hints that would make the learning curves a little easier? So far it is a real mess.

  2. #2
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    Do you have a serger? If so, maybe the rolled hem setting on it? I've used this one to hem napkins and ruffles that I would use.

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    no, I don't have a serger. Had a nice one but never used it so I gave it away.

  4. #4
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    Go very slowly??? It's really tough to make sure you don't stretch the fabric too much. Haven't done it in ages. One of the reasons I bought a serger as well, even though I haven't done more than a test with it either.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Diannia's Avatar
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    I've only used mine on flannel for baby blankets that I crochet around...sorry.
    I am too blessed to be stressed and too anointed to be disappointed!

  6. #6
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    Gosh I used to do them by hand when a teenager.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I'd do it by hand, and I don't even like hand work!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by nativetexan View Post
    Gosh I used to do them by hand when a teenager.

    I am determined to learn to use this attachment and I really must. I have stiffness in my fingers that prevent me from doing any hand sewing.

  9. #9
    Super Member GEMRM's Avatar
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    If you could stitch a line of "stay stitching" close to the edge first then it would go through easier. If you are having trouble doing the stay stitching, put tissue paper or plain newsprint underneath as you stitch, then tear it off carefully after.

  10. #10
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I'm wondering if heavily starching the fabric would help. It wouldn't stretch as much and would be easier to handle, even for staystitching. When I want heavy starch, I mix a 1:1 solution of Sta-Flo liquid laundry starch and water. Spray starching would help, but you can't get nearly as stiff a result with it.

  11. #11
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Make sure you have enough material that you can generously put in at the beginning. It should work after that. All being said, it is easier and neater to do it on a serger if you have access.

  12. #12
    Super Member lovelyl's Avatar
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    Lightly starch the fabric, then, when you start stitching, do not start at the end, but start about an inch in. There are some videos on YouTube, just google it. Good luck!
    Linda
    There may be times we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest. - Elie Wiesel

  13. #13
    Swap Hosts Krystyna's Avatar
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    It takes a LOT of practice. I know you're supposed to sew a couple of stitches and stop. Next pick up the fabric tautly and pull it to the left. Be prepared to go through a lot of practice fabric while you learn. It's not easy. I do most of my scarves on my serger. Let us know how you make out.
    Krystyna
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  14. #14
    Junior Member countryone77's Avatar
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    The following video has some nice tips on sewing rolled hems on a sewing machine ...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdDysubNrdM

    Here is another video, from a slightly different point of view ...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BH6Vq7WEZTk

    Also, make sure you use a rolled hemmer foot that is appropriate for your fine fabric
    Bev in TX

  15. #15
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    See if what I do will help. Before you even think about threading the fabric through the attachment sew a few stitches stitches close enough along the edge of the fabrlc that the stitches will not pull out. Do not sew the stitches so far from the edge that there is too much fabric to make the roll. Sorry but this is probably going to take trial and error for every different project you have.

    You are going to use the thread to "thread" the fabric through the attachment so you need to have enough to hang onto. When the entire scarf is done you will want to bury that thread in the fabric roll so whatever you leave for yourself to hang onto at the beginning is going to have to be long enough to thread through a hand sewing needle.

    Okay, now you thread it through the rolled hem foot. This really will take practice so don't give up. Also, I have never been able to sew a rolled hem with my machine on "fast forward" so I advise that you take it slow when you actually get going. A good light helps and you may find yourself teasing the fabric back into the roll from time to time. Cut the thread from side 1 long enough to get through the aforementioned needle.

    So, ta ta, first side done. The second side is the same as the first BUT there is the issue of the rolled bit on side 1at the beginning of side 2. I tried lots of things but kept winding up with a wad at the beginning of side 2. I said something very naughty and pretended I was beginning side 1 again.

    Repeat for sides 3 and 4. Bury all those threads.

    Notes: If you have the larger rolled hem foot, learn and do your first efforts using it. Makes life simpler. And longer stitches of finer thread helps too. A NEW, fine needle in the machine. My daughter just discussed this with me and mentioned that she found a line of stitching sewn along the edge of the fabric before all the hooha above is started helps. She said it helped because it gave her something to hang onto as she fed the fabric through the foot. Doing it Veronica's way would obviate the need for my line of stitches at the beginning of the side. If you decide to remove Veronica's line of threads, remember to loosen the top tension slightly so you can just pull the bottom thread out and release the stay stitching. Just remember leaving long threads at the beginning and the end of a side.

    I read really, really good hints in response to your question. Happiness is having help that incorporate into success for you. The ladies and gentlemen on this board are the best. Using the sewing machine blind hemmer is an art. You are in my thoughts and a prayer has been said for your sanity and success.

    ARE YOU STILL SURE YOU WANT TO DO THIS? ;-) Pat

    I think I cleaned up any errors. If this does help you but you get stuck on something, IM me; I probably didn't find an error. P

  16. #16
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    I recently did a rolled helm on a thin flimsy material and I used a washaway stabilizer under the fabric that I was rolling the hem on. Good luck.

  17. #17
    Senior Member DawnMarie's Avatar
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    I have a rolled hem foot for my Viking. I don't like it at all. Paid $30 for the foot, and I can't figure out how to make it work right.
    "A day patched with quilting seldom unravels."
    http://signatures.mylivesignature.co...C092AD2FC3.png

  18. #18
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Try this:
    http://www.threadsmagazine.com/item/...emmer-part-one

    I find that threads usually does a great job of explaining things and they're not afraid of photos...

  19. #19
    Super Member roserips's Avatar
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    I finger press about 2" to get the fabric started right going through the foot and for fabric that unravels easily I us a very small zig zag stitch. Also hold your fabric up in the air so it enters the folds of the foot right.

  20. #20
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    I'd say invest in some washaway stabilizer and cut narrow strips and use this as you hem the scarves --- before doing anything, I'd go to YouTube and search for rolled hem information there. Then try it out. Rolled hem attachemnts are great for some things. For the silk chiffon scarves we wore back when, I still manage to repair with hand stitching but will be finessing my serging skills eventually.

  21. #21
    Super Member knlsmith's Avatar
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    Wow! Some great info here. ob searched youtube when I was going to use my foot. But found out my foot doesn't fit my machine. Lol

  22. #22
    Super Member rusty quilter's Avatar
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    Roll over the first two inches and pin it. Then straight stitch. Once you get that first "tail" done, then roll the rest of the fabric over your hem foot, and it will stay in position.

  23. #23
    Junior Member asabrinao's Avatar
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    I make skirts all the time and rolled hems, the last step in most skirts, is the one I dread most (I might buy a serger for this very purpose). I've never had any luck with the rolled hem foot. Even my sewing teacher--who learned to sew when she was 7 years old and is 67 now--said "a person just has to be a savant to use the rolled hem foot correctly." She uses her serger for rolled hems. Since I don't have a serger, she taught me a relatively easy way to do rolled hems with a regular foot and a straight stitch. The second approach on this blogpage is exactly what my teacher taught me and what I've been doing; however, you might be more interested in the first technique, which utilizes the rolled hem foot:

    http://blog.megannielsen.com/2013/05...-a-rolled-hem/

    Good luck and let us know how it goes!
    "All good things come by grace and grace comes by art and art does not come easy." --Norman Maclean

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