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Absolutely Flat, Tight Show Quilts

Absolutely Flat, Tight Show Quilts

Old 06-29-2020, 06:58 PM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by PatriceJ View Post
i never cut my borders across the width of the fabric.
i always cut up the warp - even if it means i have to piece the border strips.

if you cut on the warp, your strips won't [warp.]
What is warp? is that parallel to the selvage?
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Old 06-29-2020, 10:26 PM
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Originally Posted by LAF2019 View Post
What is warp? is that parallel to the selvage?
Yes, and therefore is less likely to stretch. I found these educational: https://www.onlineclothingstudy.com/...in-fabric.html
https://textilelearner.blogspot.com/...ft-fabric.html
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Old 06-30-2020, 03:26 AM
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The majority of my quilts will never see a show. I have only completed one quilt that I would consider show quality. That quilt somehow just naturally laid flat and even all the way around. I hand quilted the quilt. The design was the Maine Star by Carol Doak. The quilt just was perfect in every direction. I have considered entering it many times is smaller shows but something has come up and I miss deadlines. I did use a light interface on that quilt because it was paper pieced. My plan is not to make show quilts but to make quilts that will be much loved and that is the majority of my quilt. Enjoy your quilting as you grow in your skills.
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Old 06-30-2020, 03:27 AM
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I am like you Jingle. I make quilts because I love doing that but I will never attempt to enter them in a show. I wonder now if we will ever be able to go to a show again. The show in Madison, wi. Is canceled. Anyway, my quilts are really pretty but I don’t kid myself and think they are “show quality”. I gift mine, donate quite a few and share with my family. I do my best and strive to do better. Quilting is truly a learning experience for me even now after at least 20 years.
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Old 06-30-2020, 04:00 AM
  #15  
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I answered "no" to all those questions.. But I keep on keeping on.
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Old 06-30-2020, 05:18 AM
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I make use quilts, it's part of my my definition of a quilt -- if you can't wrap a sick child in it, it's not a quilt. That is not any sort of implied slight on art or other quilts, it's just part of my working conditions.

I like to think I have/had the skill to make a judged top but I have never entered any of my projects to be judged. I have shown many quilts in guild shows. I believe strongly that we, as a guild, should show all the various stages and progressions and interests of our members.

It happens that once, due to a car accident involving one of the judges, I was called upon at last minute to co-judge a county fair near me. My personal favorite was the viewers choice winner, but my judged winner was technically better in every way, and even if I didn't really appreciate the color palette (sort of strawberry and lime green), it was clearly chosen (not a kit) by the quilter and made perfect design/color sense.

The better we get at the basic levels, the better our projects will be. For me, I press open because I get better results that way -- that also means I do a lot of pinning. I do not like to iron, but I believe it is key to my success. When I cut, my fabric is cut well and straight and correctly. I see some of my friends just drape wrinkly warped fabrics and smash down the ruler and cut their chunks, that is not the way I work!

About 20 years ago, I decided that one nod to the quilt police I could do is that I pretty much always make french double fold bias binding and I miter my corners. Even for donation baby quilts, I make my tubes of binding...
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Old 06-30-2020, 07:27 AM
  #17  
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An advantage to a quilt that the opposite sides are the same length and the outside corners are right angles - and lays flat - it is so much easier to fold!
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Old 07-01-2020, 12:12 PM
  #18  
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Kalama really covered it. You can't go wrong with those suggestions.

Also remember that a lot of those quilts you see in shows have never been washed. No shrinkage equals a much flatter look and less likely to go a bit wonky on you.

Some wall hangings may also have facings instead of regular bindings, which I find easier to get to lie flat.

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Old 07-01-2020, 12:14 PM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by PatriceJ View Post
i never cut my borders across the width of the fabric.
i always cut up the warp - even if it means i have to piece the border strips.

if you cut on the warp, your strips won't [warp.]
. I learned to sew long strips by having the top strip pulled up from the needle and only meeting the bottom strip when under the foot. I keep the top strip on my shoulder and use my hand to keep it lifted before the needle. A sewer for a fashion house showed me this way. They could not have mess ups or redos on hundreds of dollars a yard designer fabric so it had to be done right the first time. I sew my borders this way cut across the width of fabric. If the quilt edge is 60 inches long and I cut my border 60 inch long the bottom edges always meet perfectly even. Something to do with the easement of the top strip on the bottom strip. It works.
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Old 07-01-2020, 05:07 PM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
. I learned to sew long strips by having the top strip pulled up from the needle and only meeting the bottom strip when under the foot. I keep the top strip on my shoulder and use my hand to keep it lifted before the needle. A sewer for a fashion house showed me this way. They could not have mess ups or redos on hundreds of dollars a yard designer fabric so it had to be done right the first time. I sew my borders this way cut across the width of fabric. If the quilt edge is 60 inches long and I cut my border 60 inch long the bottom edges always meet perfectly even. Something to do with the easement of the top strip on the bottom strip. It works.
This sounds great,.. now if I can only remember to do it LOL
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