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Thread: Advice before I roll the dice...

  1. #76
    Member kittyannart's Avatar
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    I also pre-wash with Retayne, I feel it's an extra bit of 'insurance' against a bleed. I do not wash fabrics that I'm looking to get the drawn up crinkly look of a vintage quilt as in muslin and 1930s repros but I do put the Retayne in the wash when I finally do wash the whole thing. I am careful not to use vibrant reds in these quilts as I've seen too many reds bleed all over.

    I find it interesting so many antique quilts never seem to show signs of bleeding, but then I've only seen examples in museums that were made as 'show' quilts, not utilitarian, and may never have been intended to be washed.
    Happy Seams to you, until we meet again!
    Ani

  2. #77
    Junior Member nlpakk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn View Post
    Pre-washing fabrics is a tedious job, I agree but. . . you say that the colors are over saturated and are worried that they will bleed. If you have invested a great deal of money (second mortgage kind of money) in this fabric and you will be making what I am sure will be absolutely beautiful quilts, why would you take the risk of the fabrics bleeding and ruining your quilt? JMHO!
    I agree wholeheartedly with you auntpiggy. I just bought some fabric at my lqs to make some placemats. I expected the red to bleed, it didn't but the blue bled something terrible. Washed it about 4 times and used Retayne. Hopefully it is ok now.

  3. #78
    Junior Member nlpakk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by echoemb View Post
    I have never pre-washed, seemed like such a hassle/waste of perfectly good time. I have never had a quilt bleed. I even made a quilt for my mom with red in it and it didn't bleed. Maybe just lucky.
    It's not always red that bleeds. You can see my comment on pg 8 regarding my experience with a red and a blue.

  4. #79
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
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    I don't usually wash 1st either, but wash after if it is for a baby. I use the shout color catchers and never had one bleed.
    Grandma of 5 beautiful grand kids, 4 crazy cats & 1 dog!

  5. #80
    Super Member 1screech's Avatar
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    To wash or not

    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn View Post
    Pre-washing fabrics is a tedious job, I agree but. . . you say that the colors are over saturated and are worried that they will bleed. If you have invested a great deal of money (second mortgage kind of money) in this fabric and you will be making what I am sure will be absolutely beautiful quilts, why would you take the risk of the fabrics bleeding and ruining your quilt? JMHO!
    I hate washing also. The only quilt fabrics I have washed are fabrics for a blue and white quilt. I was afraid the blues would run to the whites. I have used Kaffe fabrics and they came out fine. I do wash with a color catcher. Hope this helps.

  6. #81
    Super Member nstitches4u's Avatar
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    I hate to pre wash fabric, but I do pre wash if the colors are very bright or dark colors like black and navy blue. I would hate to spend a lot of money for fabric and spend hours making a quilt and then have the colors bleed when it is washed.

  7. #82
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    I have a book by Ricky Tims, and he advises prewashing. Are you ever going to wash the quilt? If not, no problem.
    johans, Michigan's UP, Hiawatha National Forest West

  8. #83
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    I always prewash fabrics for my quilts, just to safe guard against bleeding. If it something that doesn't require a lot washing I don't worry about it.

  9. #84
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    I do not pre-wash my fabric for quilts. I figure if it is quilted it will not shrink. I have been fortune so far, none have bled.

  10. #85
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    I never prewash. Never have had a problem even with vibrant colors. I wash the quilt once the binding is on with Tide and run it through the dryer and it's always just perfect. If I had to prewash, I'd never quilt again.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  11. #86
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    One of the best things on the suermarket shelves is the "Color Catcher" Just a little sheet kinda like a dryer sheet, but, is you thrown in the wash, all the colors attach to it and usually don't bleed on each other. I highly recommend these. Eliminates the pre-wash for me. Just have to remember to throw one in when you wash the quilt.

  12. #87
    Super Member Wanabee Quiltin's Avatar
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    Marti Michell says to cut off a snip of fabric, wet it thoroughly and lay it on a white paper towel. If it turns color, then you know you need to wash it. I also have tons of Kaffe's fabric and plan on checking it all out. I have had very expensive name brand fabric bleed horribly, washed the fabric at least 6 times before it stopped. I am so thankful that I did not use it in a quilt before washing. I think quilters are in two camps about this, do what you feel you need to do.

  13. #88
    Super Member caspharm's Avatar
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    I never prewash. I only wash after I am finished if I know it's going to be a use quilt. However, whether prewashing or not, I would recommend using Color Catchers or that other color wash. Retayne would be good as well.

    I just washed a quilt I gave my son that has red in it and had run (he didn't wash it properly). I used a bleach alternative, several Color Catchers, and cold water wash. The quilt now looks whiter and the Color Catchers were very red.

  14. #89
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    I come from a day and age where fabric was pre-washed for bleeding as well as shrinkage. I always pre-wash. By the time I would take to do all the cute little tests to determine bleeding, the fabric could have been washed. It is worth the effort to me.
    Happy sewing and quilting,

    Janet

  15. #90
    Super Member LynnVT's Avatar
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    What's interesting here is that no one mentioned using Retayne in the wash. I sometimes do wash and use it, but hate ironing large amounts of fabric. If you don't iron, cotton is going to be all wrinkly, which I don't like. Years ago I bought a small mangle at a firehouse sale. Came from a local inn that used it for linens. It was great for fabric. Eventually it died, so I'm back to the iron. This board "requires" that all swaps be made of prewashed fabrics. Does this mean some folks ignore that? I'm about to make blocks for the batik swap and was thinking I should wash the pieces I intend to use for it.

  16. #91
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LynnVT View Post
    What's interesting here is that no one mentioned using Retayne in the wash.
    huh?
    ... the use of retayne has been discussed
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  17. #92
    Senior Member sylviak's Avatar
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    If you haven't prewashed and the quilt runs, don't panic....try soaking it in Oxyclean for several hours or overnight and it will usually come out and the colors stay bright. I have a friend who occasionally bring me a quilt top or blocks that she picks up at estate sales. She recently brought me the cutest Sunbonnet Sues which were appliqued and the stem of the flower she was holding was hand-embroideried in green. One of the blocks had some stains on it, so she washed it by hand. The green embroidery thread ran! She said to just put it in the corner where it wouldn't show much! I used an Oxyclean paste and a Q-Tip and was able to remove the stain. She didn't want the quilt washed before I gave it to her, so I pinned a couple of color catchers to the quilt with instructions to use it on the first wash.

    I pre-wash most of my fabric, but I also use the hot water in the cup test if it is something I would rather not pre-wash before cutting. Occasionally patterns will actually tell you NOT to pre-wash...OBW, etc.

  18. #93
    Member Bicycle Hobo's Avatar
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    To make a long story short: I prewash everything made in a natural fibers before storing it away, and sometimes even do a double check (testing a small amount in a hot cup of soapy water,swishing it around, then blotting it on a piece of white cloth or paper towel) questionable fabrics like heavy over dyed reds, blues, or similar. Most of the time, in the garment industry production end, prewashing is not performed unless to get an washed effect like done on "prewashed" or "broken in" jeans. Their care labels reflect this by instructing to wash in cold water use a low machine drying temperature, line dry or dry clean. I don't want to risk not only shrinkage (I use 100% natural fabrics mostly), but also running dyes disasters during the first wash. All my quilts/blankets are intended to be utility ones-used and cleaned many times throughout their usable lifespans. I don't want to worry about anything after I construct the fabric and wash & dry them over and over again in either home or commercial washers/dryers on warmer side of the water/heat temperatures.
    Last edited by Bicycle Hobo; 04-22-2012 at 06:31 PM.

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